Twingiant – Devil Down

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There is smog like quality to the sound of US band Twingiant which invades every pore and corner of the senses with voracious appetite; within that thick immersion though the band infuses a searing melodic veining and smouldering enterprise to leave the imagination keen and appetite even hungrier. They describe their sound as simply loud and heavy, but as shown by new EP Devil Down, it is also bracingly flavoursome and rigorously compelling.

Devil Down is also uncompromising in its touch and intensity, Twingiant blending fiery stoner and heavy rock with imposing sludge richness for an inflammatory and predatory cauldron of sound. Formed in 2010, the Phoenix, Arizona based quartet drew keen attention with debut album Mass Driver two years later and last year’s Sin Nombre EP. Their success only backed and reinforced the band’s live stature which has seen them persistently impress and inflame audiences whilst sharing stages with the likes of Windhand, Pallbearer, Weedeater, Intronaut, Metal Church, Satan’s Satyrs, Guttermouth, Black Tusk and numerous more. Now with their self-released and produced Devil Down EP, the band look poised to awaken a more momentous spotlight upon themselves. May be it is not a release to ignite a explosive blaze within thunderous rock ‘n’ roll climes but it Devil Down is certainly a fierce proposition to firmly thrust Twingiant upon a broader landscape of attention.

The striking presence of the release begins with the instrumental Old Hag. Starting from a restrained and elegant flame of immediately enthralling enterprise and craft, the track grows within the ears as its melodic acidity and sultry charm creates a spark for the imagination to run with and explore. There is also a sinister edge to the invention and sonic beauty fuelling the track, the guitars of Tony Gallegos and Nikos Mixas providing a highly suggestive soundscape and narrative courted by raw shadows provided by the gripping rhythms of drummer Jeff Ramon and bass predation from Jarrod Le Blanc. It is a transfixing proposition which as it reaches its finale, digs into a new texture of aggressive tenacity and attitude.

The impressive start is followed by Dead To Rights, a track striding forcibly with a combative swagger from its first second. Loaded with just as magnetically swinging grooves it soon adds theDD Front Cover (1) coarse texture of Le Blanc’s vocals to the mix, his tones strong without blowing anyone away but with their generally minimalistic presence in the context of songs, they make the perfect incitement to the blistering tempests of around him. A brawling eruption of skilled endeavour and resourceful voracity, the song makes way for the carnivorously toned Daisy Cutter. From its first breath the bass growl is carnally bestial and soon matched by the thickly gravelled vocals. Heavy metal seeded grooves entwine the intensive weight and prowl of the song, at times taking over with their engaging flames and mouth-watering beauty, though the scuzzy hostility of the bass is a constant prowling intimidation ensuring every twist comes with its share of menace.

Through The Motions is another enslaving instrumental and with no slight on Le Blanc’s vocals, these are the tracks where the listener can really play and immerse into the creative emprise of engagements and release. They are a canvas for the imagination and emotions to dance freely, and this track a virulent persuasion weaving sizzling strands of sonic and melodic temptation with inventively rabid rhythms for a fascinating evocation, a tapestry for thoughts to cast adventures with.

Tiger Lily suffers a little being sandwiched between its predecessor and the next up instrumental, but still provides a feisty and aggressive enterprise of heavy footed riffs and spicy grooves to persistently enjoy. There is something missing though, a spark which evades even the enticing twists and shifting textures within the song, and whilst it is a potent companion it does not linger around as other tracks on the album, and especially like Under A Blood Moon. The third instrumental is the best, a sultry twang to guitars an immediate seduction which only grows as melodies and grooves embrace the flavouring for their own infectious web of wonderfully unpolished and organic temptation. Once more it is a piece which simply ignites ears and imagination into eager life, every diverse flavour and note seemingly a seed to expanding adventures, especially the dark beauty of strings at its conclusion.

Devil Down ends with its title track, a bruising prowl of heavy metal and sludge rapacity aligned to groove and noise rock causticity. It is a predator, an emotionally blackened stalking which lumbers and crawls with the varied creativity of the guitars its light and merciless rhythms its teeth. The song is an immense end to an outstanding release, where even though for personal tastes the instrumentals steal the show, every track is an almost primal incitement to want plenty more from Twingiant, a band whose stock and presence surely from this point will be infesting the world’s full awareness.

The self-released Devil Down is available on vinyl from 2 December @ http://twingiant.bandcamp.com/album/devil-down

A cassette version of Devil Down will be released via Medusa Crush Records on February 7th.

http://twingiant.com/

RingMaster 02/12/2104

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No Way – Sing Praises

Pic  Tony Stanley

Pic Tony Stanley

From sound and presence to voracity and appeal, there is nothing lightweight about the debut release From US band No Way. The four-track Sing Praises EP is a brute of an introduction to the Brooklyn quartet, a compelling and enslaving tempest of noise and invention fusing thick essences of noise and punk rock with those of sludge and heavy melodic rock. Some bands seem to instinctively tune in to the listener’s wants and primal needs, and it is fair to say that No Way certainly fed and intensively satisfied ours.

No Way was formed in 2012, swiftly making their mark on the New York punk scene. Drawing comparisons to the likes of Helmet and Unsane, the band were soon sculpting their own distinct presence and sound, unafraid to infuse varied styles and raw spices into the mix of sound mentioned earlier. Their live reputation has also grown from those early potent days with the foursome sharing stages with bands such as Whores., Fight Amp, Black Tusk, Inter Arma, American Sharks, Cancer Bats, Naam and White Hills. That attention will only be broadened and strengthened by the release of Sing Praises, the Andrew Schneider (Unsane, Pelican, Shrinebuilder) recorded and Carl Saff (Young Widows, Helms Alee, OFF!, Kowloon Walled City, Big Business) mastered proposition an imposing slab of prime sonic and rhythmic beef flavoured with an imagination and a creative intrigue to get the taste buds singing.

The release looms up on ears with opener The Cutting and within a breath is walling them in with bulging riffs and debilitating rhythms. It is an imposing start but only the teaser to greater things as warped sonic scythes from guitars coveradd to the brewing mayhem. Vocalist Chuck Berrett is as a formidable a presence as the song itself, his raw and growling tones an instant lure complimenting and inciting further the rugged turbulence around him. At its heart there is the inventiveness of a Melvins to the song and the caustic beauty of a Cancer Bats whilst the core swagger to grooves is Coal Chamber bred, their swing reminding of the song Sway. It is a merciless seduction gnawing and flirting with thoughts and emotions, an immediate pinnacle matched straight away by Shake the Meat.

The second track makes a less intensive but just as gripping entrance, the guitar of Jordan Melkin coaxing ears and imagination with potent hooks as ripe and pungent beats from drummer Chris Enriquez provide an intimidating cage. Further enhanced and coloured by the throaty bass bait of Dave Maffei alongside the varied and fierce vocals, the track is an unpredictable and insatiable predator threatening and teasing with impassioned aggression and shadow bred, bordering on deranged enterprise. The riveting blaze is followed by the exceptional prowl and creative stalking of War Dance. It is a hypnotic proposition, a lone riff accompanied by this time more restrained tones from Berrett the initial drama; bait subsequently joined by merciless slaps from Enriquez and eventually stoner-esque hues within explosive roars. The song hunts the senses and psyche from start to finish, even its intermittent immersive and invasive sonic squalls a menace which increases the theatre induced by the engrossing single minded slim stalking either side of them

The track is scintillating and leaves the appetite greedier than ever so thankfully closing track Pastures / Abuelas is more than able to feed the hunger. Over eight minutes of imaginative tension, it is a rigorously captivating pursuit of the senses loading with vicious bass growls, savage riffs, and a sprawling thick sonic smog, all punctuated with a rhythmic resourcefulness which leaves ears bruised and emotions raw. There is also a psychedelic smearing to the atmosphere and inventive colour of the track but it is the hellacious and brutal ingenuity of the track, as well as the stoner bred grooves further into its adventure, which lingers longest and the deepest in the psyche. Dark and ravenous with greater menace in its restraint than a full-out assault could achieve, the track is a delicious immersion and challenge as well as another open side to No Way’s sound.

Sing Praises is an exceptional debut from a band with all the potential to be a potent and inspiring force ahead on the evidence of this stunning entrance. No Way seem to know what ears and instincts want in heavy, brutal, and incendiary exploratory sounds, and of course this is only the beginning….

The Sing Praises EP is available now digitally and on cassette @ http://www.nowayny.com

https://www.facebook.com/nowayny

RingMaster 07/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Witchrider – Unmountable Stairs

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With a sound somewhere between Queens of The Stone Age and a pact between Nirvana and Soundgarden, nodding to the former more often than not, Austrian rockers Witchrider are poised to present their debut album Unmountable Stairs. It is a fiery and rigorously captivating proposition which merges familiarity with raw invention, culminating in a release which does not leave a blaze in its wake but definitely a smouldering and lingering temptation which persistently increases to leave appetite and satisfaction bloated.

Hailing from Graz, Witchrider began in the November of 2012 with initially the name Desert Mountain but soon decided the current name was a better fit for their music, the title taken from “riding the witch”, a another term for sleep paralysis. The band wear their inspirations from the likes of QOTSA and Eagles Of Death Metal openly but employ them in their own scuzzy recipe as evidenced on the new album and the band’s previous self-titled EP of last year. Initially a trio of vocalist Daniel Dorninger, guitarist Hans-Peter Leitner, and drummer Michael Hirschmugl, the band enlisted bassist Bernhard Weigl for their live shows who subsequently became a full-time member and makes up the quartet unleashing the colourful treats upon the Fuzzorama Records released Unmountable Stairs.

OCD starts things off, looming up on ears from a distance with sultry fuzz lit riffs and caustic melodies. A loud breath of Josh Homme and co is unmissable but it only adds to the intrigue and drama which comes with the song. Firm beats and a bass rumble brings shadows whilst the vocals of Dorninger, as the music, are not that far removed from a Homme like delivery and texture. The raw air to the song equally brings an imagination awakening aspect whilst the scorched slightly warped grooves and hooks throughout the opener, just hold ears and passions in their grip. It is a tasty contagion that has hunger for more bordering on lustful, so it is good that the following 1 For 5 is just as raucously compelling and virulently infectious. A bulging bassline matched by resonating beats provide an irresistible skeleton to the fusion of noise and stoner rock, swiftly hints of the likes of Melvins and Kyuss converging on thoughts as the song spreads its flames of sonic enterprise. Bedlamic at times, the track provides another twist and aspect to the sound and invention of the band, the two ridiculously addictive opening songs closely related in structure but individually striking.

The pair of Black and new single I’m Outta Breath keeps things boiling nicely, the first sending sonic shards through ears and across a feisty mesh of again heavily QOTSA influenced rhythms and riffs, before acidic scythes of sound aligned to potent vocal harmonies and melodic exploration express their tantalising narratives. It is a fascinating if less than explosive encounter which still easily grips attention before its successor strides in with an instant creative and addictive devilry. Riffs and hooks need little time to start reeling in the imagination and passions, whilst soaring blazes of guitar light the insatiable temptation of the song. Though it is one of the songs seemingly more intent on being catchy and enslaving its recipients it is also one of the most original and unique in sound, and if any comparison can be raised it is that of Australian band Voyager.

Its infection whets the appetite all over again ready for the scuzzy tempting of Far From You, a proposition cored by a pungent throaty bassline and a Nirvana-esque sonic scowl. With an additional hue of blues causticity, the track hits the spot without sparking additional lust before the melodic climate of SP immerses ears in its enticing graze of sound courted by mellow vocals. It also lacks the something extra which ignites the single but matches it on being something more uniquely different to Witchrider in sound, whilst both tracks parade encounters which still only add to the increasing potency of the album.

   The Cabin strolls in next with a dramatic air to its persuasion and wonderfully toxic sound, bass and riffs stalking ears with lustful intent for another helping of addictive pleasure. It is a sinister outing with a portentous breath to even its melodic fire whilst its predatory nature is a giveaway even under the erosive atmosphere of the excellent track. It’s almost theatrical narrative in word and sound is emulated by The Fog, the song also employing a gait which prowls with a devilish glint in its manner but with an even slower and heavier lumber. Additional attention reveals the real difference to the two songs which a casual listen misses, and both tracks create a haunting psychedelic landscape of intrigue and creativity which apart or together sparks imagination and pleasure.

Next the album’s title track strides through a Sabbath-esque terrain with Black Tusk like structures, across which spicy harmonies and wiry grooves lay out their mystery and incendiary temptation. As the album it is a slow burning but undeniable grower which makes the fullest seduction over time unlike Witch-Hunt which steals ardour and acclaim on the first examination of its tenacious enterprise over a sinew boned canvas. Marked by rutting riffs and beats inside a caustic wash of sonic enticing, the track flirts with the same spicery that flavours most songs but turns it into its own, not necessarily unique but definitely riveting trap.

The album is completed by the bluesy Styx, a track which as enjoyable as it is never quite convinces to the same depths as others songs upon Unmountable Stairs. Nevertheless with a presence which to these ears would be like Josh Homme plays the Kinks, it is a fine end to an increasingly impressing and fun release. The album as a whole announces that Witchrider is a band with all the invention and imagination to make a big impact, especially if they can or want to evolve a truly unique sound, the one thing reining in Unmountable Stairs from being a startling debut.

Unmountable Stairs is available from November 14th via Fuzzorama Records @ http://www.fuzzoramastore.com/en/cd-s/witchrider-the-unmountable-stairs.html

http://www.witchrider.com/

November sees Witchrider on tour with Truckfighters, with dates at…

Nov 10 – Brudenell LEEDS; Nov 11 – Sound Control MANCHESTER; Nov 12 – King Tuts Wah Wah Hut GLASGOW; Nov 13 – The Basement NOTTINGHAM; Nov 14 – O2 Academy Islington LONDON; Nov 15 Hard Rock Hell – PWLLHELI; Nov 16 – Oobleck BIRMINGHAM.

RingMaster 03/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Voodoo Sex Cult – A Year And A Day

Voodoo Sex Cult Photo

Steamy, sweaty, and imposingly heavier than a stampede of overweight buffalo, the sound of US rockers Voodoo Sex Cult is one uncompromising rampage. It also as proven by the band’s debut album A Year And A Day, makes for one exhaustingly appetising and thrilling incitement for ears, body, and passions. From a potent but steady start, the release proceeds to expand and rumble with bullish tenacity and ferocious energy, emerging as one insatiably compelling and enjoyable brawl of intimidating rock ‘n’ roll. It is fair to say that the album is not bulging with striking originality or pushing boundaries but such its passionate devilry and arsenal of demanding rhythms, storming riffs, and fierce grooves, it is hardly an issue once inside its voracious enterprise. Providing a thick swamp of hard and southern rock entwined with similarly heavy doses of heavy metal and grunge, the Arizona quintet’s sound and album is simply a creatively salacious fury to greedily devour.

Announcing themselves as, “The Rev, the Preachers Son, The Redneck, The Castilian, and The Survivalist, five guys that share one common goal, one common passion; to create their own distinct sound of rock and roll, and share it with the world”, Voodoo Sex Cult from band name and bio alone makes for an intriguing proposition which their album swiftly backs up. Unleashing Cuttin Loose as their first riot on the album, the band flings robust riffs and imposing rhythms at ears from the off. The opener bustles into life with firm aggression but soon relaxes into a classic rock stroll driven by the punchy beats of Doyle Meredith and the great slightly grizzled tones of vocalist Royce Taghon. It is a potent start to the album but not one to ignite the passions, though certainly the craft and invention of guitarists Tim Hills and Peter Avalos captivates whilst the throaty bass endeavour of Chris Burgess raises a keen appetite. It is a safe way to open the album in many ways, setting down an appealing marker before pushing limits and imagination across the release.

The following Voodoo Rising emerges from a magnetic and restrained coaxing of guitar punctuated by dramatic rhythms. It is a slow and sultry entrance which easily catches the imagination ready for the exertion of energy and intensity which soon follows with a blues whisper in its air and sonic intrigue to its creative expression. The track is an easy-going yet forceful encounter continuing the firm and strong start of the album before making way for the similarly structured and flavoured Break It On Down. There is a distinct character to the heart of the song though, its gait and tone individual as vocals roar with craft and passion whilst grooves and riffs along with striking rhythms weave a mesh of heavyweight rock ‘n’ roll. There are few surprises on the songs to this point, but the riveting move into vocal and bass alone here is a tasty twist giving the track greater substance and persuasion.

From the more than decent 40 Days, the album hits a new lofty plateau starting with Down And Dirty, a track growing outward from a start of fiercely jabbing beats, throaty bass predation, and a slow wail of guitar. It is a menacing and VSCCOVERworking2gripping start which only accentuates its pressure and stature once riffs bulge alongside a southern bred groove and the bass delivers its own broody twang. Ridden by the increasingly enjoyable gravel toned vocals of Taghon, the track is an intensive smoulder of sultry heavy rock and predatory melodic expression, the first pinnacle of the album, though it is soon surpassed by Broken. Short but spicy grooves embrace ears from the start, their lure instantly matched and pushed further by the dark tones of Burgess’ bass and the similarly heavier delivery of Taghon. Like a mix of Clutch and Hellyeah with a touch of Black Tusk, the track growls and flirtatiously swerves with imposing intent and heated charm. It is an enthralling canvas which the band then turns inside out to reach even greater heights; a passage of unpredictable and startling invention seeing the track moving from a contagious stomp through a low guttural musical groan to a fiery and agitated climax merging in all the goodness the song started out on. It is a glorious proposition taking best on album honours.

Both the humid tone and energy of Fade Away and the intensive lure of Dead Season keep ears and emotions tightly involved, the first a crawling croon loaded with infectious low key melodies and stormy expression led by the varied roar of Taghon, and the second whilst moving with a similar gait, entwining dark and heavy provocation with raw grunge fuelled endeavour led by again impassioned vocals. Essences of Stone Temple Pilots make hints as the song prowls, blooms, and ruptures with attention gripping sonic enterprise and primal intensity. It is another mighty peak to the album with a seriously lingering potency that though not equalled by either Home or Legacy is emulated in their ability to leave a meaningful persuasion in their wake. The first of the pair bounces on a blend of blues and hard rock, with a just as healthy hint of funk and classic rock in its easy going rock ‘n’ roll revelry whilst its successor returns to the dark-side in sonic provocation and bass antagonism under a flame of acidic grooving and dusty vocals. Both songs feed the greedy appetite ignited earlier by the album whilst emotions are by this point bloated with satisfaction.

   A Year And A Day uncages further major highlights in its home stretch, firstly with the brilliant Vsc-17. Riffs and bass stalking straight away chews upon and ignites the imagination whilst the crisp beats of Meredith sculpts enticing bait ready for the increasingly addictive invention coursing through the song. It is a beast of an incitement and temptation, the album’s most unique offering revealing more of the potency and expressive songwriting within the band.

Closing with the voraciously infectious and anthemically aggressive Sinking Slowly and finally the inimitable provocation of Black Jesus, with blistering grooves and searing melodies across its cantankerous stride menacingly tantalising, A Year And A Day is a brute of a treat and unrelentingly thrilling. Voodoo Sex Cult has not cast a spell of originality and major surprises with their debut but certainly has unleashed a tempestuous hex of riffs and grooves to feast heartily and persistently upon, a more than good enough reason to embrace their first outburst.

A Year And A Day is available now @ http://voodoosexcult.com/shop/

http://voodoosexcult.com/

RingMaster 21/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Possessor – Electric Hell

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Hailing from London with a penchant for occult metal and with already the Wings of Fire EP under their belt this year, UK metallers Possessor have unleashed a rather tasty and impressive debut album in the stormy form of Electric Hell. There is not much more we can tell you about the band except that if you like a cocktail of sludge and stoner metal with thrash and varied metal rapacity, then this is an ear rioting album to whip up the juices. Consisting of nine tracks which simply flirt with the imagination whilst rigorously fondling the passions, Electric Hell is a treat for all fans of bands such as Black Sabbath, Slayer, and Fu Manchu through to Black Tusk, Gruntruck, and Kyuss with plenty more on offer. There is one band though which came to mind again and again as the release set to work on ears, and that is early Therapy?, the album vocally and in its predatory sounds holding a highly agreeable and uncanny essence of the Irish trio about them.

Unique in its own presence too, the album is a gloriously raw and irresistibly cantankerous encounter which makes an immediate and appetite igniting impression through the first rugged swipes of opener Chasms of Malice alone. From the first breath, sinew clad strikes of guitar courted by the bestial throaty charm of bass crowd ears to spark swift attention, the imagination following suit as an acidic groove and caustic riffing emerges to consume the senses. There is a punk vitality to the track too, especially once the effect surfaced vocals join the now rampaging stride of guitars and the punchy rhythms. It is a glorious enticement with the snarling bass stealing the limelight, but only just from the toxic groove and insatiable swagger of the song.

Its striking start is swiftly followed and matched by Invisible Face, again riffs setting down predatory bait which is coloured by stoner-esque hues and infectious grooves. With a haunted tone to the vocals and grumbling voracity to both bass and drums, the track bulges with rabid riffs and spiky hooks to inflame an already greed bitten appetite. It is a hunger soon fed a tasty morsel by Limb from Limb and spoilt by the outstanding Castle of Bastards. The first of the two is a more slowly intensive proposition, its acidic binding of sonic enterprise as restrained and flavoursome as the gentler expression of the vocals. It is deceptive though as at its core, the song is primed and driven by an incessant nagging of riffs and the ever incendiary bass sound. It is an underbelly which is fuelled with rabidity, a lure as potently predacious as the sounds around it are magnetically reserved. It is a fine encounter but soon left looking up at the might of its successor. Like most tracks on the album it is driven by thrash bred tenacity and muscular urgency which makes for a familiar and easily digestible spine, upon which the rest of the song expands and brings its creative devilry. Castle of Bastards is no exception but to this insatiable bait it unleashes a bestial breath and inventive sonic unpredictability which simply bewitches. The track is where that reference to Therapy? is first bred, though earlier tracks hint at it at times too. Far too short at less than two minutes long, the song is pure hostile drama and quite magnificent.

The sultry stoner grooving of Strange Summoning over a garage punk and heavy metal blended canvas makes its own sturdy claim for top track honours. Again brief in presence but rich on irrepressible adventure with riffs and grooves the prime addiction, it soon makes way for the Sabbath-esque Heavy Dreams. It is a song intensive in weight and primal structuring yet veined with a sonic intrigue and melodic causticity which would not be out of place in a Torche or Melvins treat. It is followed by the virulent contagion of the instrumental Skeletal Form, a corrosive dance of scathing riffs and inhospitable rhythms with an impossibly addictive groove, one again related to anything the previously mention Irish band uncaged on the Shortsharpshock EP or the Troublegum album. Equipped with sludge oppressiveness and acute stoner seeded sonic enticements, the piece is a deliciously enslaving encounter which reinforces the depth and devilish character of the band’s exhilarating sound.

The album is concluded by firstly the sonic grazing of Face the Possessor, a track which fails to find the same eagerness of reactions as its predecessors but still with intimidating jagged riffery and entrancing guitar endeavour leaves ears richly satisfied and the imagination enticed. The final song of the album is its title track, a hypnotic and unrelenting persuasion of doom spawned pressure and bordering on insidious temptation. It is a demonic slice of instrumental alchemy which shows that if ever their frontman lost his voice the band would not disappoint on stage thanks to their absorbing and spellbinding, not forgetting ingenious sonic adventure.

As Electric Hell seduces time and time again, it is hard to imagine that Possessor will go unnoticed for long by fans, media, or even label interest. Now is the time to submit to their diablerie we say, this raw and unpolished gem of an album a thrilling ticket to the start of their inevitable ascending ride.

Electric Hell is available now @ http://possessor.bandcamp.com/album/electric-hell

https://www.facebook.com/possessorband

9/10

RingMaster 10/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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I Am Duckeye – Commando Too

pic Michael Reynolds

pic Michael Reynolds

Those insatiable Australian riff stalkers I Am Duckeye have returned with second album Commando Too and if you thought they could not exploit and distort the classic cacophonous swipe any more than they did on debut album Husband, then stand corrected as the Melbourne quartet has bred and plucked a whole new tsunami of belligerent riffery and merciless revelry. Consisting of fourteen tongue pressing slabs of salacious devilment and unbridled wickedness, album two spreads the toxins birthed in its predecessor into new insatiably irreverent and seriously compelling brawls.

From the first day of their rampage in 2008 it is probably fair to say that the quartet of guitarists/vocalists and brothers Sam and Matt Haycroft (who also play in Sydonia, Afterwhite and Chico Flash respectively), bassist Jules (also in Dirty F), and drummer Sean (Sydonia), has had the good clean living people of Melbourne drenched in nightmares and the hellacious basking with broad grins. They are a band that once assaulted and thrilled by lustful hunger is inevitable, as with us after their inescapable Punching Dicks EP. It was a release which told us all about the mischief and intent of the band whilst Husband revealed beneath all the humour and sexual antics, I Am Duckeye takes their music seriously and with a plentiful of skill and imagination. The Duckeye riff mobile has been taking on steam to match its weight and with the release of Commando Too, it can only be a matter of when and not if the tea bagging reprobates infect and bring down the world.

The crowd-funded album opens with the towering ‘offspring’ of first album’s track The Riff, well certainly a closely bred cousin. Son of a a3551119337_2Riff reveals its intent lyrically and musically within its first breath, scraping guitars teasing ears as the vocals provide the source of the narrative in the bands as always one of a kind way. It is not long before rhythms are caving in on the senses whilst guitars turn up with searing flames and ferocity. The music growls like a woman giving birth, grizzling sonic endeavour adding to the heavyweight voracity driving on the track’s twisted rampage. It is a tremendous start given extra spice by the brief My Sharona like licks and swiftly matched by the just as ravenous endeavour of Grip It. Though distinctly different the song starts with the same intensity and scarring riffery of its predecessor but as it establishes itself soon unearths a hell of a demonic riff and throat which is plain rabid. Suddenly a juggernaut of rapacious urgency and spiteful dynamics, the confrontation tears down senses and ignites the imagination like a mix of Slayer meets Age of Menace meets Melvins, and is just brilliant.

Hi Viz comes next and though it has its moments just does not click overall. Steam punk expulsions and floating discord kissed harmonies drift into view first courted by a single guitar. It is an intriguing if not captivating start but one soon working once embraced by a torrent of scathing riffs and sonic antagonism. Sadly that is the best part of the song and only when it intermittently returns does, for personal pleasure, the song work. Nevertheless it makes a decent variation before the addictive punk- skat fest of Duckeye Boogie picks up ears and passions for a rhythmically hypnotic and sonically seductive romp. As always the band’s choice of words and lyrical adventure is irresistible but as with the last album it is the music which grabs the biggest plaudits, though combined everything is a destiny suiting fit.

The just as tremendous Windmills comes along next, again the band playing with their punk side (something their mother never warned them about). There is a sense of Dirt Box Disco to the feisty sinew driven punk ‘n’ roll incitement, where rhythms and especially riffs steal the honours once again though the infestation of hooks have their say also before the album takes another twist and venture into disco with Tuesday, I Go the Blues Way…only kidding. The song is a sweaty rather than sultry moan of the blues done Aussie style and as always with the band comes in an unpredictable soak of delicious taunting. Imagine Lemmy singing the blues after lessons from Sir Les Patterson and you get the drift to another great moment.

Things only get better and better as the album progresses, the noise rock mess of I Need Rehab just excellent and hilarious. Vocally distraught and musically deranged until its heavy rock needs escape, the track is just irresistible as is the following post/steam punk come electro orgy of What is Wrong with Me?, a brief self-reflection which is more pride than insecurities. Matching the pair in setting leakages in motion is Stool Bender, a fierce heavy stoner bred rocker of a mating with the ears which flirts, gnaws, and suffocates the senses, though not always in that order. Stalked by the bass and slapped around by the drums, passions are already aflame but sent feverish by the cruel causticity of the riffing and the ever engaging vocals. The track is another undeniable slab of evidence to the growing craft and intent of the songwriting of the band and their accomplished sounds, so much so that you just wonder if one day we will see a ‘serious’ rock/metal album coming from the guys.

This latest lofty plateau of the album continues with the stomping animosity of the blistering Meth is Death and the Black Tusk like avalanche Agonhymn, both adding rich fun, diversity, and might to the release before the angst drawn Headbutt. If persistence and sonic nagging is a sin than this band is going right where they want to with tracks like this their infernal anthem. It is a bestial and ruinous experience, a damnation of contagion.

The album finishes with firstly the exhausting blaze of Ayy Ayy, a savage and uncompromising fury which makes Mastodon look timid but a tempest which is just as gleeful mellowing in unexpected places with wistful harmonies and looks. From there the release closes on the sweltering climate and stoner sonic winery of Panchow, a final leviathan of proof in case you had any doubts left that this band can write exceptional metal/rock songs of varying spices. It is a smouldering stoner/psychedelic flame of acidic enterprise and evocative resonance which leaves a lingering fire for the imagination and passions to immerse in.

After Husband we were left wondering if I Am Duckeye could go much further in their invention and craft let alone devilment; well Commando Too is the evidence that not only can they but it is still blissfully early days…

Comando Too is available now @ http://iamduckeye.bandcamp.com/

http://iamduckeye.com

9.5/10

RingMaster 11/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Triggerman – Origins, Lost Travellers & Rock & Roll Heaven

Origins Official

You are always guaranteed irrepressible heavyweight riffs and intensely thunderous rhythms from a Triggerman release as well as grievously gravelly vocals which provide the icing on the muscular cake. To date you are also sure of a proposition which leaves appetite and passions full, something new EP Origins, Lost Travellers & Rock & Roll Heaven breeds in cavernous depths. The three track release is a monster of an incitement, unleashing all that makes the Northern Ireland riff warriors rigorously magnetic and unforgettable whilst twisting in new strains and exploits in to its plentiful bounty.

Hailing from Derry, the quartet of Bap (vocals, guitar), Niall (guitar), Rory (drums), Dixie (bass), follow up their exceptional Hail To The River Gods album with another sizeable homage to the riff. The riff is king and Triggerman its unrelenting champion which as ever is vigorously proven on the new EP. Formed in 2002, the band has been a heavyweight protagonist from day one, their first album Brand New Day in 2010 an acclaimed introduction which Hail To The River Gods took to another level and depth of spotlight two years later. Converging rapacious metal and the heaviest of ferocious rock into their memorably distinct rampancy, an onslaught carved with spicy grooves and melodic toxins, Triggerman has shaped their finest moment yet with the new EP, a release already sparking greedy impatience inside for their next provocation.

From the first breath of opener Origin Of Man, incredibly chunky riffs are gnawing at welcoming ears before being swiftly assisted by lashes of sonic enticement and sinewed rhythms. Once in full swing the track strides purposefully as Bap uncages the lyrical premise of the song with his unique tones, the beginnings of man and the disputing of Darwin and his theories unveiled. With a tongue firmly lodged or not, the narrative has a resourcefulness and swagger to match the bold enticement of the track. Across its delicious lures, riffs chug with enterprise and melodies in their most acidic form entwined with spicy stoner seeded grooves which enslave imagination and appetite. At its core Rory beats out an inescapable trap whilst the heavily throated bass call created by Dixie simply enthrals and ignites the primitive antagonist inside. It is a glorious start and return by the band, a song showing an even greater maturity in design and adventure than the last release without losing the core essence which makes Triggerman one of a kind.

The Lazarushian swiftly follows and is instantly embracing the senses in a spellbinding sonic lasso of melodic endeavour which once established in thought and hunger relaxes into a virulently infectious canter around the next turn of the EP’s venture. Niall creates an instinctive seduction with his enthralling designs around the strolling lyrical premise from Bap, beats matching the gait of the vocals whilst the bass shapes imposing shadows to add captivating textures and depths to the riveting canvas. Across its full scenic adventure, both Bap and Niall create a thrilling web with their guitar enterprise, reinforcing the open evidence that the band is much more than just about an allegiance to the riff.

The closing Valhalla stomps from its first second with a raw glaze and addictive temptation to its riffs and hooks, the track arguably closer to the last album than the other pair of songs but still shaping a fresh twist in the creative evolution of band and sound within the release. The track roams ears and imagination with a more straightforward suasion than elsewhere until igniting with a blaze of stoner metal flames and sonic invention to bring a thrilling release to a masterful captivating close.

Looking at the start, uncompromising middle, and departure of life lyrically, Origins, Lost Travellers & Rock & Roll Heaven is an exceptional new incitement from a band which should have its name spoken alongside the likes of Svolk, Black Tusk, and Red Fang from now on in. Triggerman have always been setting standards to match the names of heavy rock and metal but now they run the risk of being a template for new bands.

The self-released Origins, Lost Travellers & Rock & Roll Heaven is available now digitally from the usual suspects and on CD from http://www.triggerman.co.uk

https://www.facebook.com/triggermanrocks

9.5/10

RingMaster 02/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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