Fahran – Chasing Hours

Fahran Online Promo Shot

Their second album but our introduction to UK hard rockers Fahran, the band easily gives potent reason to the busy acclaim around them with new album Chasing Hours. Made up of thirteen impressively accomplished and melodically fired tracks, the release awakens a rich intrigue for the quintet. It is not an encounter which manages to ignite a fire in the belly of passions, though it has moments where it takes them on a lustful dance, but certainly from start to finish it sparks and encourages a healthy appetite for the band’s potential and magnetically flavoursome sound.

Fahran was formed in 2012 after emerging from the ashes of Toxic Federation. It was not long before the Breaston five-piece unveiled their self-titled debut album to strong and keen responses from fans and media alike. Infusing inspirations from the likes of Queen, Iron Maiden, Shinedown, Alter Bridge, and Black Stone Cherry into their expressive hard rock sound, the band has also built an attention grabbing reputation with their live performances, which has seen them successfully play the Bloodstock and Download Festivals. Last year saw the departure of bassist Alex Stroud and vocalist Nick Whitcroft but the band swiftly bounced back recruiting Josh Ballantyne and Matt Black on bass and voice respectively, before creating the crowd funded Chasing Hours. With the pair alongside guitarists Jake Graham and Chris Byrne, and drummer JR Windsor, Fahran are poised to wrap up the attention and emotions of the nationwide rock scene with their second album, and it is hard not to imagine the band finding an intensive spotlight upon them from its release.

Chasing Hours is a refreshing treat for all hard and melodic rock fans but even if those genres generally are not the staple diet of ears the band offers plenty within the album to fire up attentive interest. Opening track Long Gone Fahran Cover Artworkinstantly flirts with the imagination through a delicious and slightly melancholic strum of guitar, its tone soon assisted by the darker breath of the bass and resonating swipes of drums. A sonic bred atmosphere rises around the masterful coaxing next to fill senses and thoughts with poetic drama and emotive suggestiveness. It is a fascinating introduction to the song which brews to a greater intensity before parting for equally enticing grooves and rhythmic enterprise to stake their claim on the passions. In no time the track is launching into a feisty and melodic striding of sound and intent which without the potency of that glorious beginning still inspires a highly satisfied and eager reaction.

Straight away the band’s songwriting craft and technical skills are open within the first song, showing a maturity and invention which belies their still young years. These qualities are right away reinforced by the next up Take This City Alive. Equipped with an eighties bred vivacity and infectiousness, the song bounces along with an absorbing weave of sonic endeavour and antagonistic rhythmic aggression. It leaps at the ears and taunts them to embrace the swing and boisterous familiarity of its body, which even with an aversion to its seed era is not easy to refuse. A Thousand Nights is one of those classically fuelled rock songs where again the band do not hide their inspirations as it flames around ears. It does not come up to the same levels of the first couple of tracks but with riveting guitar enterprise and ideation from Graham and Byrne locked within the intimidating rhythmic bait of Windsor, the track offers increasingly inviting bait within melodic rampancy.

Current single I Heard A Joke Once unloads a muscular and sonically alluring proposition with riffs a contagious beckoning across the track. It is a forceful suasion though again, for personal tastes, lacks the spark of the opening pair and many of the subsequent tracks on the album, including the following title track. A sinew sculpted slice of rock balladry with a whiff of country rock and classical seduction to its emotive narrative, Chasing Hours is a smouldering slice of enjoyment which maybe does not set emotions raging but has them simmering very nicely before making way for the boldly pleasing pair of Cased In Steel and You Could Be Mine. The first of the two finds more rugged scenery to soak in earnest vocals and melodies whilst the second is a similarly sturdy with a raw canvas of persuasion coated in evocative sonic hues and the persistently impressing vocals of Black. The song also reminds forcibly that the band really know how to cast enslaving grooves and rhythmic baiting.

As good as those songs and the highlights before them are, they are mere appetisers for the true pinnacles of the album. First up comes the brilliant Some Kind Of Family, a storming stomp of a track which from its first riotous breath also entwines ears in emotionally coloured melodies and sonic adventure to enthral and potently feed the imagination. Hooks and grooves are short yet deeply entrenching whilst Black and band find their most mesmeric vocal strength yet, all within the ever spicy and gripping rhythmic web of Windsor and Ballantyne. Its magnificence is swiftly equalled by Are We Free, a fiery rampage of scorched grooves and menacing beats all honed into a blaze of seductively bruising rock ‘n’ roll with more than an air of Black Stone Cherry and Seether to it. The bass of Ballantyne stalks with predatory instincts across the song for his finest moment but again it is the pleasingly nagging grooves and their irresistible toxicity which seal the deal with a greedy appetite.

Back To Me with its wonderful almost folkish opening suggests it is a rival to the might of the previous pair, guitars and vocals a spellbinding union. But without admittedly losing its hold on attention and satisfaction, it does slip into a more formulaic hard rock offering, though with it continually flirting with those initial lures it finds a ready welcome anytime. Prison is similar in that success, its elegant melodies and emotive hues a transfixing enticing which gives the song its tightest grip on the passions yet the powerful and climactic expulsions, where Black shows his richest delivery in the song, despite making a striking impression still lose the early hold the track had. Nevertheless it is a potent and continually growing proposition but soon left pale against the metallic enticement and melodic rock invention of the outstanding Black Mirror. Another major moment of the release, the song proves the band can merge gentle caresses with raucous intensity for an exhilarating incitement.

Completed by the highly agreeable if underwhelming Storms We Ride, the album is a persistently engaging and rigorously captivating encounter. Chasing Hours has moments where it ebbs and flows in its success, though to be fair that is as much down to personal tastes as anything, but also dramatic moments where Fahran show they have the potential to take UK hard rock to a new world awakening level. It is hard not to be excited about the future of this band.

Chasing Hours is available from Monday 11th August through all digital outlets.

http://www.fahran.com/

8/10

RingMaster 09/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Pop Evil – Onyx

onyx

Though its veins are not exactly bursting with originality, Onyx the new album from US rockers Pop Evil is without doubt a rigorously compelling and invigorating slab of fiery melodic rock. Every shrug of its sinews and each melodic flame exhaled soak ears with an open familiarity whilst every muscular blaze of emotion and searing of sonic enterprise leaves thoughts and passions greedily content. It is may be not going to set the year on fire but the band’s third album is definitely bringing it a thoroughly enjoyable stomp of aural temptation.

Still under a keen spotlight after touring across Europe supporting Five Finger Death Punch, the band hits the European market and ears with a mighty slab of potent contagion. Released via Eleven Seven Records, the album has a voracity and tempestuous passion to its body which along with inciting melodies and perfectly barbed hooks, simple enthrals the senses and imagination. Having already established themselves on their side of The Pond with their rich tempting sound and albums War of Angels and even more so Lipstick on the Mirror, as well as a clutch of attention grabbing singles, the Michigan quintet are setting their sights on a wider audience and it is hard not to expect a healthy success through Onyx alone. Having also impressively shared stages with the likes of Three Doors Down, Papa Roach, Puddle Of Mudd, Theory of a Deadman, Buckcherry, Judas Priest, Black Stone Cherry, and Seether since forming, as well as going through the obstacles music throws up including line-up changes, Pop Evil have found a fresh and determined tenacity which shines across their new release as powerfully as the craft and passion soaking it. Produced by Johnny K (Disturbed, 3 Doors Down, Megadeth), Onyx is an encounter which does not herald a torrent of surprises but does ensure satisfaction is fat to bursting.

The album gets off to a flyer with opener Goodbye My Friend, an instant attention grabbing encounter which from its initial guitar and bass coaxing awakens a potent appetite for what is to come. Nick Fuelling and Dave Grahs take little time casting a web of riffs and grooves to snare the imagination whilst bassist Matt DiRito brings a predatory growl to the mix to accentuate the immediate potency of the song. It is an enthralling mix to which vocalist Leigh Kakaty adds his impressive tones as the rhythms of drummer Josh Marunde punctuate and frame the thrilling enticement. The track also offers the comparisons which stand across the whole album, its sounds like a mix of Seether and Sevendust with the metallic rapaciousness of Spineshank, the emotive angst of Three Days Grace, and the anthemic craft of Drowning Pool. To be fair though that still only gives part of the picture as shown by the second song on the album.

Bringing a rich colour of Alice In Chains to its striking canvas of sound and gripping narrative, Deal with the Devil prowls and strolls around the senses like a warrior, the guitars and bass crowding ears with forceful intensity and ravenous intent whilst rhythms punch with weighty persuasion. The latest single is a stirring and climactic incitement, ablaze at times with infection soaked melodies and senses entwining grooves for a thoroughly exciting temptation. One not quite matched but certainly thrillingly backed up by previous single Trenches. Holding a defiant air to its body of sound and lyrical call, there is an air of antagonism to the song which only urges the sonic warfare of the guitars to blaze with brighter flames and virulence as additional keys and electronic bait bring extra charm.

The riotous charge of the album takes a break with power ballad Torn To Pieces, a magnetic song which goes exactly where expectations assume but still leaves a lingering and increasingly potent lure in its wake. Kakaty is a powerful and controlled vocalist throughout the album and shows his depth of expression and emotional quality masterfully here to match the strengths of the sounds caressing and at times scorching his words. It is a glorious emotive encounter which leaves the following Divide looking a little pale in comparison. To be fair the song is a feisty and vivaciously striding suasion but lacks the extra guile of say its predecessor or the punchy invention of other songs on the release. Nevertheless it makes a pleasing play upon the ears as does its successor Beautiful, another song which just misses the potency and success of others, but still leaves a flavoursome offering for a hungry appetite to devour.

Things return to the opening plateau with the outstanding Silence & Scars, a song which seduces and pressurises thoughts and emotions simultaneously with imaginative and emotion driven invention. There is a touch of Bush to the song, its grunge spice and melodic weaves absorbing whilst a cathartic essence to its whole picture offers a magnetic radiance. The track is bewitching as is next up Sick Sense, a furnace of a song which is as raw as it is mesmeric, as caustically charged as it is a resourceful seducing. Again it is like an instant friend, that familiar seeding inescapable bait but with a voracious fuel to the backing vocal roars and a nu-metal menace to the ingenious twists within the song, again that Spineshank reference coming forth, the track is an exhilarating proposition.

Fly Away and Behind Closed Doors keep the album burning brightly and at times ferociously, the first an eagerly striding charge of pop rock urgency across evocative textures whilst the second steps into a more formula yet forcibly appealing canter of melodic fire and vocal enticement. Both songs leave a smoking long term bait working away even after their departure, their heat and passion enough to override a slightly predictable design, before the more aggressive and excellent Welcome To Reality has it moment to ignite the senses. It again confirms that Pop Evil are masters at creating songs which might not break away from existing trodden paths but bind the listener up in feverishly addictive and irresistible anthems.

The album closes with Flawed, a striking dramatic and impressive end to Onyx which simply underlines the quality and exciting presence of band and release. Pop Evil is not inventing the wheel, or arguably even redesigning it, but it is giving it a breath-taking and often scintillating soak of explosive colour.

Onyx is available now through Eleven Seven Music with the standard European version holding 3 additional tracks whilst the deluxe version features an extra 5.

www.popevil.com/

8.5/10

RingMaster 02/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Silent Jack – Snakebite

SJ

    Silent Jack is one of those propositions where you pretty much know what you are going to get flavour wise but not necessarily the juicy way they unleash it on the senses. Hailing from Birmingham, the British quartet engage and riot with the imagination through a sound bred openly in eighties hard rock and filtered through a glam rock mischief. Their new release Snakebite is an exciting offering which provides all the attitude, endeavour, and enterprise needed to suspect that the band is on a path to strong recognition. The seven tracks which provide its rippling temptation is a mixed bagged when it comes to offering surprises to expectations but an unqualified success in contagiously recruiting thoughts and emotions into the fiery bosom of the band’s captivating presence.

Listening to the release you can easily assume the influences which have inspired the band, the likes of Motley Crue, Guns ‘n’ Roses, Hardcore Superstar, Ratt, Buckcherry, and Black Stone Cherry clear flavours throughout Snakebite. It is easy and arguably fair to say that there is little new or original within the encounter but that cannot take away from the thrills and spills which sparks the real enjoyment it consummately provides. Formed in 2009, Silent Jack has won over its home town tenfold and now it is looking to seduce the rest of the country and beyond, and though it might take more than this brawl of pleasure to achieve that they are easily on course and capable.

The band gets off to a flyer with opener Brand New Start, beats and riffs an immediate potent coaxing before the guitars of vocalist Rich Silent-Jack-Snakebite-Cover-300x300Mason and Adam Carson boil up the air with rapacious riffing and sonic flames. The bass of Dickie Spider brings dark intimidation into the mix next whilst drummer Scott Carson intensifies his punchy raps as the track expands into a stronger feisty stride. The guitars continue to snarl as Mason unveils his appealing vocals, the song already flowing infectiously across the senses as rhythmic swipes and a predatory tone adds to its persistent persuasion. The track has the potential to be a hard rock anthem in so many ways and with the sonic flair and adventure woven into the encounter by Adam Carson it is a virulent enticement which has imagination, appetite, and passions alive.

The following King Cobra is just as addictive, it’s rapping beats and more distant scrub of guitar a teasing entrance which easily leads greed into the heart of another blaze of accomplished rock ‘n’ roll stoked with flailing sinews and melodic acidity. As with the first the contagious call of the song is irrepressible and irresistible, the chorus call alone incitement to listener participation and emotions thirsty for more. Once again individual skills and ideation impress but together the band most light up ears and the continually bubbling promise of the band.

Going Down ensures the impressive start is continued, its salacious lure of guitar from the first breath of the song seducing instant submission which the rampaging rhythms and caustic riffery only accelerates. There is a great raw edge to the track which sets it apart from the first two and a groove which twists rapaciously around the imagination, persistently licking at the passions with its serpentine tongue. Once more maybe something truly different within hard rock is scarce in the songs, as the release, but unleashing such epidemically catchy and enthralling adventure as it does there are no complaints valid enough to defuse the enjoyment of the song.

A scorching fire of guitar sculpting and intense rhythmic pressure opens up the next up Love Factory to make an instant strong impression, the grumbling nature of the bass adding enticing intrigue to the satisfying invitation offered. A heated blues flames joins the blend soon, wrapping every twist and turn of the song as Silent Jack stomp once more with a skilled and confident swagger. Feet and voice are soon enslaved and enlisted by the stroll and infection of the song, its gait a compelling bait and chorus another which only the dead could ignore.

The first four songs are the pinnacle of Snakebite though the remaining trio of tracks still add to the stature and potential of the band as well as the pleasure gained from the release. The imposing ballad Angels Cry is first and easily shows the vocal prowess of Mason and emotive craft of the band’s songwriting within its shapely and flavoursome design. It does miss out on the spark of earlier tracks though to merely satisfy rather than potently excite as equally does Made In Heaven. The song like the previous one, is impressively sculpted and veined by sonic hues which ask for attention as the display of anthemic vocal tempting, but the trigger to make the encounter larger than life is absent. Nevertheless both songs and the closing Hot Luvin’ with its masterful teasing bring the release to an invigorating and pleasing conclusion.

Snakebite is a proposition which hard rock fans should take a punt on as you can see them devouring the release greedily. Certainly originality is low and a wish for some experimentation which would lead to a distinct character for the band would be welcome but it cannot deny that Silent Jack has delivered a very enjoyable encounter and have the wares to become a real force in European rock ‘n’ roll. It may take time but we are not betting against them.

The self-released Snakebite is available now!

https://www.facebook.com/silentjackband

8/10

RingMaster 08/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Falling Red – Empire Of The Damned

Falling Red Online Promo Shot

    There is something very familiar about Falling Red and their explosion of heavy metal soaked with dirty hard and sleaze rock fire, a fusion which wakes up the passions like a merger of Motley Crue with Black Veil Brides and Black Stone Cherry. That aspect though is only a positive in the hands of the UK band which picks up well-trodden and arguably exhausted existing enterprise and brings it back to life in an invigorating and thrilling contagious rampage distinct to themselves. New album Empire Of The Damned is a storming riot of addictive hooks and incendiary grooves thrust into the heart of high octane anthemic and hard hitting rock ‘n’ roll. There is an eager buzz around the band right now and the album shows exactly why.

     The Carlisle band formed in 2007 and has been stirring up audiences earning a strong reputation from almost day one with their renowned and incendiary live performances. Over the past years Falling Red has supported the likes of Sebastian Bach and Steel Panther, to strong acclaim, and sparked further attention with the Hasta La Victoria Siempre EP and 2010 debut album Shake The Faith. With successful headlining tours also under their belt the quartet of vocalist/guitarist Rozey, guitarist Jayde Starr, bassist Dann Marx, and drummer Dave Sanders set about creating and recording their Pledgemusic funded second album with Matt Elliss (The Black Spiders, The 1975), the mastering undertaken by Pete Maher (U2, Rolling Stones, Linkin Park) last year. Consisting of eleven insatiably ravenous and passionate encounters, the release is an anarchic and belligerent blaze of virulent rock infectiousness which easily ignites the senses and emotions.

     Opener Time To Rise is a short scene setter, a breeze of melodic guitar behind defiant words which raises its temperature and cult cover lrgintensity the further it declares its intent before a closing gentle coaxing makes way for the immediately antagonistic The Devil You Know. Punchy beats and energy charged riffs stalk and stroll through the ears whilst the vocals of Rozey hold a mischief to their fiery tempting. It is not a dramatically imposing and striking track but one which wakes an eager appetite for the album and gives a healthy indication of what is to come. Skilfully presented and fired up with an obvious passion, the song makes an infection clad access into the album.

    Its potent invitation is soon put in the shade by the outstanding We Escaped A Cult, the new video single from the band. A radiant drizzle of guitar elegance provides the first breath of the song with skittish percussive invention dancing around its luring as Rozey again picks up strong attention. Soon into its heavy stride the track stomps into the imagination with addiction forging grooves and again openly predacious rhythms but equally with a charm and devilry that leave the emotions alert and enthused to join the action. With a Manson-esque swagger and great anthemic group vocals equally as flirtatious with the passions, the contagion is a masterful and thrilling encounter.

    The groove driven Break Me takes little time in stealing its slice of the brewing fixation with the album, the sinew framed romp of taunting rhythms and toxically virulent riffery irresistible with the bass of Marx not for the last time having delicious rapacious savagery to its tone. That lure makes a similar call on the next up Outcast, Marx leading the song into another instantaneous and virulent temptation on the emotions. Shadow cloaked at the start evolving into a melodically flaming blaze of hungry rhythms and bold sonic causticity, the track then takes its allurement up multiple degrees with one of those salacious grooves which street corners were made for. It is a beast of a song with enticing of epidemic proportions as it makes a riotous rival for best song honours.

    The exciting stature of the album is continued with Disposable, a twisting and swerving hook driven song with more enjoyable toxic bait than a rat trap, and the title track, though the second of the two takes longer to make its full persuasion. From an accomplished and engaging slow start the song is soon flexing muscle and intensity with passionate melodic and vocal expression to feed intrigue and satisfaction. It does not make the swift union of other songs with emotions even though everything about it sweats craft and enterprise. As suggested given time the track does reveal a depth and strength which is hard to dismiss or avoid as it adds another strong aspect to the album’s impressive character.

     As The Defiled reminding We Are Reckless and the punk toned rocker No Sanctuary step forward with their irrepressible energy and adventure pleasure is kept at a high even if passions may be less intensively ignited, both nevertheless high octane provocations which still only invite eager attentiveness. The album is certainly stronger in its first two thirds than its last but as the scintillating predatory Lonely Way To Die with its acidic melodies and psyche infecting grooves shows there is still a bruising, exhilarating, and snarling proposition lying in wait to ignite the rioter in us all. Followed by the more predictable yet refreshingly digestible rocker Change For No One, Falling Red brings Empire of the Damned to a vigorous and imaginatively lustful close. The band may have been the rising storm on the radar of a great many but with their new album you can only see the awareness of the whole of the country’s rock ‘n’ roll community finding a greedy attraction towards their recognisable but still original tempestuous musical anarchy.

www.falling-red.com

https://www.facebook.com/fallingredofficial

8.5/10

RingMaster 26/01/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Patriot Rebel – Two Worlds

Patriot Rebel Online Promo Picture

We have had a bit of a ‘crush’ on UK rockers Patriot Rebel ever since the band submitted a couple of tracks for our Bone Orchard show at Audioburger.com, songs receiving a persistent airing which is as much down to the greed of the listeners as much of the hosts. This meant anticipation for their debut release, the Two Worlds EP, was high and forcibly rewarded by a heavyweight riff clad storm of passionate breath-taking rock ‘n’ roll. The six track riot is bruising rock at its very best, a direct and virulently contagious confrontation which hits the target dead centre with flaring nostrils, menacingly flexing muscles, and a melodically crafted adventure fuelled by adrenaline.

The Nottingham has been breathing from around 2007 but it was with the coming together of current line-up of vocalist Paul Smith, guitarists Danny Marsh and Dave Gadd, bassist Will Kirk, and drummer Aaron Grainger in 2011 that the band began finding a potency and presence which really began commanding attention. Their sound is a tempestuous mix of alternative rock, grunge, and unpolluted rock ‘n’ roll thrust through the ear with a mountainous energy, drawing references to bands such as Stone Temple Pilots, Alter Bridge, and Shinedown and even more predominantly Black Stone Cherry and Velvet Revolver. With the distinctive tones of Smith and an aggressive sound which is unfussy but concentrated in its craft and effect, their live performances are no strangers to acclaim with the band since forming giving the likes of Tesseract, Jettblack, Skarlett Riot, Cornerstone, Earthtone9, Spirytus, and Violet a tough act to share stages with whilst equally leaving festival crowds aware and eager for their presence. Recorded with producer Matt Elliss (Black Spiders, Terrorvision, Skarlett Riot), Two Worlds is the next Patriot Rebel strike on the country and one you can only see placing the band on the frontline of UK’ s rock scene.

The self-released EP opens up with the imposing Propaganda, sinew driven riffs and equally predatory rhythms consuming the Patriot Rebel Cover Artworkears with intimidation and intrigue as Smith offers the song’s croon. The bass of Kirk is especially rapacious in presence and voice within the encounter adding to the almost oppressive initial breath, an introduction which soon explodes into a fire of sonic infectiousness with the chorus. It is one of those moments where you ‘recognise’ the stranger, the song a previously unheard persuasion which hits like an old friend and enlists an instant companionship from your own voice and neck muscles. The track like the EP is not sculpting brand new adventures it is fair to say but as it firmly proves here it rewrites existing invention into something most bands would seduce your granny for. It is a potent powerful start immediately matched and exceeded as the release rampages.

What Goes Around makes a gentler entrance at first, certainly stripping less flesh from the senses anyway until it erupts into a brawl of hungry riffs and punchy rhythms ridden again by the magnetic vocals. Its rich bait takes little time in laying down its lures, the chorus like calls soon seducing the passions with another epidemic of rioting toxicity. Rippling with melodic persuasion which burns heatedly as the track intensely barracks the senses, the song is a ferocious charge of insatiable energy and skilled temptation designed to grip its recipients by the throat and launch them into a torrent of submissive participation, physically and emotionally.

The following Goodbye is an emotively lined slower track which seduces with an intense almost melancholic embrace, guitars weaving an imaginative and impacting web of enticement around the almost reserved delivery of Smith. The song instantly shows why the band has been spoken of in terms of the likes of Alter Bridge though as it burns brighter and increases its melodic flames and muscular presence, Patriot Rebel go somewhere which for our mind those bands have only flirted with. The song smoulders and sears the air the further into its compelling depths you go, bass and riffs a thick haunted wash of intensity alongside vocals drenched in emotional expression. It probably takes longer than others to make its full declaration but with focus emerges as one of the highlights of the release, amongst a few to be honest.

Both Come Of Age and Holding On are songs we know well from the show and each leaves the already raging appetite with another full meal to devour greedily. The first saws the ear’s cartilage from its first second, carnivorous riffs snarling whilst Smith draws a vocal breath and lets rip with a sonic wail to match the spirals of scorched design from the guitars. The track is a voracious torrent of energy and enterprise, a maze of ideas and enthralling invention veining its stormy mass of intensity and predation whilst again an irrepressible addictive enterprise casts its spell on the passions.  There is a muggy air to the track but it only adds to its weight and intent leaving the listener gasping for air whilst waiting for its successor. The second of the two multiplies the weight and depredation of its predecessor before expanding it into a melody fuelled blaze of hard rock meets heavy metal passion. It is a glorious anthem of sound and intent which resourcefully ignites and enslaves the emotions into their fullest ardour, a track which dares you not to be calling out its finale in a mutual vocal union, a challenge you only will lose.

The release ends with The Storm, a track which in the wake of the previous onslaughts feels at first almost pale in comparison that is until it too corrupts the senses with a dramatic and perfectly sculpted furnace of sonic endeavour and vital melodic invention. It is an absorbing encounter to close off an outstanding release. It maybe their introduction to most but Patriot Rebel has immediately thrust themselves into a vibrant spotlight with Two Worlds, and they can only get better with is simply a mouthwatering proposition.

www.facebook.com/patriotrebel

10/10

RingMaster 07/12/2013

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Emphatic – Another Life

emphatic

Nestling potently and comfortably amongst the likes of Three Days Grace, Alterbridge, Chevelle, and Creed, US rock band Emphatic step forward once again to light up ears and thoughts with their new album Another Life. It is not a release which exactly sets down new markers or offers dramatically unique ventures within its eleven emotively powerful offerings but certainly it is one which leaves a strong canvas of infectious and richly rewarding musical narratives for senses and imagination to eagerly indulge in. The successor to the acclaimed Damage of 2011, the new album provides an appealing dose of heart sculpted highly accomplished rock intensity and passion.

Formed in 2004 by guitarist Justin McCain, Emphatic has had a steady and constantly ascending emergence, first leaving strong marks through their self-titled debut album of 2005 and three years later the Goodbye Girl EP. It was the release of Damage though which triggered a new depth of attention and awareness, not forgetting acclaim around the band. Live too with the sharing of stages with the likes of Stone Temple Pilots, Buckcherry, Avenged Sevenfold, Papa Roach, Breaking Benjamin, Flyleaf, Five Finger Death Punch, Theory of a Deadman, Alter Bridge, Black Stone Cherry, and Adelitas Way, the band’s reputation has grown and brought an enthused audience to their excellently crafted and energetically honed sounds.

The release of the last album was followed by the departure of vocalist Patrick Wilson who suffered a career halting injury when he fractured his larynx, and with also rhythm guitarist Lance Dowdle and bassist Alan Larson leaving, Emphatic was facing uncertain times. Eventually though McCain and drummer Patrick Mussack enlisted Jesse Saint (Scum of the Earth/The Autumn Offering) on bass and Bill Hudson (Cellador) on guitar whilst the frontman spot was taken by Toryn Green, the former vocalist of Fuel and touring lead vocalist for Apocalyptica. The new blood and energy gave a new lease of life to the band it is fair to say and certainly has combined to create in Another Life, their finest moment yet and a thoroughly enjoyable and persistently satisfying encounter.

The Omaha, Nebraska based band immediately works on the senses with the opening persuasion of Life After Anger. The song is a keen Album Coverand emotional caress with the vocals of Green taking little time to impress amongst sturdy beats and sinew driven riffs. The melodic heat and expressive voice of the track equally lays a reflective enticing lure and with an element of Seether to it, the song makes an excellent lead into the heart of the release which is straight away backed up by Time is Running Out. Again there is a familiarity to the track, something which applies to the album as a whole, but equally there is a flourish and intensity which marks it as Emphatic bred. The addictive sonic groove and continuing to impress vocals and supportive harmonies capture the imagination alongside a solid resource of invention and enterprise which parades across the song to bring forth a strong appetite for album and band.

The following Lights makes a gentle coaxing with its first breath before adding a little more urgency to its still restrained and emotional beckoning. The song than settles into a provocative and intensive narrative which without matching the heights just set still draws thoughts and emotions into its embrace whilst stretching the variety within the album, a melodic diversity given another flame by next up Some Things Never Die. The song similarly misses previous plateaus set but with a melodramatic touch of keys and tenderly preying call of riffs and bass, emerges to give its share of strong satisfaction and another string to the album’s aural bow.

Both The Choice and the title track bring the album up to its earlier heights, the first with an expectation feeding slice of rock but one which ensures they have a skilled and potent meal whilst the second entwines a delicious groove around an imaginative and fiery melodic painting of contagious adventure and evocative craft. The best song on Another Life, it leads passions by the hand into a sweltering dance of reflection bred, melody soaked colour within captivating passionate scenery.

As tracks like the stylish I Don’t Need You and the ballad Louder Than Love unveil their varying temptations and the fevered Forbidden You provokes the imagination, Emphatic continue to provide a thoroughly engaging presence. The three songs again are slightly adrift of the biggest highlights of the release whilst being soaked in a sound which arguably many bands have explored previously, but each nevertheless creates a persuasion and invitation that is hard to refuse or not want to accompany again.

Closing with the greatly pleasing Take Your Place, a track like many with an anthemic lure to its chorus and skilled bait to its melodic craft, and the lead single from Another Life in the shape of the adrenaline fuelled Remember Me, the album at the end of the day is an absorbing and openly enjoyable encounter. Superbly crafted and impressively delivered, Emphatic has brought a proposition which leaves you fully satisfied and with an increased appetite for their offering, a meal you know and feel safe with but also one filled with little spices of invention that keeps it fresh and daring.

http://Emphaticrock.com

7.5/10

RingMaster 23/10/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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PATRIOT REBEL to release ‘Two Worlds’, on 9th December‏

 Patriot Rebel Online Promo Picture

UK ROCK OUTFIT PATRIOT REBEL RELEASE DEBUT EP!

 
Bursting out of Nottingham, Patriot Rebel are here to stamp their mark over the whole of the UK. The Brit riff-lords are poised to rise with the national release of their stunning debut EP ‘Two Worlds’, out Monday 9th December.
Taking from the likes of Stone Temple Pilots, Alter Bridge and Shinedown, but with a particular affinity for Black Stone Cherry and Velvet Revolver, Patriot Rebel pitch colossal riffs against soaring melodies, and the end result is immensely enthralling.
Although the roots of the band can be traced to 2007, it was not until 2011 that the current line up of Paul Smith (Lead Vocals), Danny Marsh (Lead Guitar), Dave Gadd (Rhythm Guitar / Backing Vocals), Aaron Grainger (Drums) and Will Kirk (Bass) began to solidify. After perfecting their live set, the quintet started to play throughout their local area and soon earned a hearty reputation for delivering explosive live performances. Touring and festivals soon followed as the band shared stages with the likes of Tesseract, Jettblack, Skarlett Riot, Cornerstone, Earthtone9, Spirytus and Violet. And it wasn’t too long before the ascending rockers sold out the legendary ‘Rock City’ in Nottingham.
With the band’s live reputation flourishing, the five-some decided to turn their attention to releasing their debut record. Patriot Rebel headed to Axis Studios to work with esteemed producer Matt Elliss (Black Spiders, Terrorvision, Skarlett Riot) and they proceeded to put down tracks for their debut EP ‘Two Worlds’. Now fully complete, the record delivers on all fronts. Bursting with pounding drums, throbbing guitar lines and engaging hooks, the band have a beast of a debut for your absorption. The EP packs six killer cuts spanning from the thunderous riffage of ‘Propaganda’ to the fist-in-the-air anthem of ‘What Goes Around’ and to the rousing ‘The Storm’, which highlights the band’s growing diversity and songwriting prowess. With shows in the pipeline to support the record, everything is now falling into place as the rocksters will battle it out for their place as one of the new breed of Brit Rock bands set to break in the UK!
| PATRIOT REBEL RELEASE ‘TWO WORLDS’ ON MONDAY 9th DECEMBER FROM ALL DIGITAL STORES |
 
Patriot Rebel Cover Artwork