Dope Body – Lifer

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In covering Natural History, the previous album from US noise sculptors Dope Body, we boldly declared the band as ‘without doubt one of the most exciting bands in music right now’. Returning with its successor Lifer, the Baltimore quartet has done nothing to change or dispel that declaration. The release is a glorious and voracious maelstrom of invention as now expected from the band, but also one with another open twist in the evolution of Dope Body’s sound. Certainly Lifer is the band’s most rock ‘n’ roll release to date, raw and attractively abrasive, but within tracks and sounds are as dramatically eclectic as ever.

Formed in 2008 for originally just a one off show, Dope Body soon saw and found their sound stirring up the local scene and its passions. Early releases via HOSS Records drew potent attention but it was Natural History, released as the new album through Drag City, which widely announced the band as one of the more original and creatively warped fresh breaths in modern music. Between albums the band has feverishly toured and played shows before seeing the latter part of last year out taking time focussing on other endeavours, bassist John Jones on his solo project Nerftoss and guitarist Zachary Utz and drummer David Jacober with their two piece band Holy Ghost Party, whilst vocalist Andrew Laumann turned to his visual arts side and exhibited work at the Galerie Jeanrochdard in Paris, the Pre Teen Gallery in Mexico City, and Signal in Brooklyn. This year though soon saw the foursome back together in the studio and with producer Travis Harrison creating what is another stirring encounter from them.

The album opens with Intro, an instrumental with carnival-esque vivacity and mischief to the gripping rhythmic juggling of Jacober and scuzz bred tenacity of guitar. It is a great raucous start to the album, instantly unveiling some of the varied rock ‘n’ roll seeded essences to be explored across the release. The piece subsequently slips seamlessly into Repo Man and its opening slow caress and shadowed crawl. Right away the distinct tones of Laumann entice and flirt with ears before raging to match the increased intensity and aggression of the music. It is a captivating track which has as much an air of Nirvana to it as it does The Stooges. In hindsight it is a steady opener to the album in many ways, a raw encounter which as the album, holds a real live feel to its touch and breath, but proves to be just a taster of greater things to come.

That stronger potency grips ears and imagination right away with Hired Gun. From a deliciously acidic web of sonic revelry, the song strides out with a garage punk energy and causticity, though it is still prone to the great scythes of sound liferwhich opened up the encounter. Taunting senses with a devilish swagger and punkish rabidity, the track is a transfixing slice of noise rock, but as expected from the band only part of the story as seductive surf rock sultriness and rhythmic tantalising emerges before a fiery finale. From this song the album really takes unpredictable and diverse shape, the following Echo sauntering through ears with a smouldering blues climate aligned to garage punk turbulence. Like Tom Petty plays The Cramps, the song is an enthralling croon with tendencies to expel caustic ferocity as it makes another step up towards the album’s highest peaks.

They come in the next clutch of songs, starting with AOL. A brawling slab of blazing hard and punk rock incitement, whispers of The Clash and Melvins hinting away, the track comes loaded with lingering grooves and biting hooks for a relatively brief but scintillating roar. It sets ears and emotions up perfectly for the even richer triumph of Rare Air. A song which kind of bridges this and the last album, it emerges from a metronomic coaxing lined with a ridiculously infectious sonic tempting. Instantly there is a post punk emprise to the song, bass and guitars flirting with a mix of Joy Division, Tones On Tails, and John Foxx led Ultravox breeding. It is a gripping adventure with Laumann as vocally enterprising as the tapestry of sounds and textures around him. The pinnacle of the album, the song alone reasserts Dope Body as the imaginative masters of sonic and noise alchemy.

Straight away confirming that point, the dark seductive Day by Day steps forward next. With a heavily shadowed bass resonance spotted by sonic elegance making the first gentle touch, the track forcibly intrigues and entices senses and imagination, increasing its lure and potency as it gathers pace to craft a Bauhaus like tension and presence. That increase in energy also brings a funky gait and appetite to the song, which in turn leads to squalling clouds of scuzz lined ferocity and garage rock devilry. With a pinch of psychobilly and a dab of old school rock ‘n’ roll too, the song takes the listener through scenery of explosive invention and bold creative mischief, all persistently cored by the irresistible throaty bassline which kicked it all off.

Toy strides purposefully across ears next to return the album to another boiling garage punk/grunge soiled stomp, engaging ears in a dusty rampage of Rocket From The Crypt meets Damn Vandals like irreverence. As everywhere though, references only give a slight idea of something uniquely Dope Body, the band forging new templates and imagination smothering ingenuity at every turn, proof of course immediately coming forward through the pair of Nu Sensation and I’d Say to You . The first of the two is another multi-flavoured rocker, seemingly embracing every corner and era of rock ‘n’ roll to give birth to an uncompromising and inescapably addictive rock devilry, whilst its successor is a torrent of repetitive hooks and lingering grooves as catchy as the common cold and sneakily lingering.

The album is closed by the striking Even In the End, a song opening on another skilfully conjured rhythmic contagion before spreading its melodic and atmospheric tendrils into a progressive terrain of bracing sonic invention and immersive dark shadows. Within that landscape though, guitars and beats unleash imaginative and lively agitation whilst vocals range from slow drawls to raging emotion. It is an absorbing exploration bringing the outstanding release to a mighty close.

Lifer is not a step forward in quality for Dope Body but a side step from Natural History into similarly impressive and individual waters. The excitement brought by a Dope Body encounter continues and the band grows in stature once more.

Lifer is available via Drag City now.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/DOPE-BODY/310914069790

RingMaster 23/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Secret Sight – Day.Night.Life

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Seemingly bred from the heyday of the genres it embraces with its spellbinding sound and presence, Italian band Secret Sight has brought 2014 one of its unexpected and compelling triumphs in the dramatic lure of Day.Night.Life. Brewing up a starkly haunting and rigorously riveting blend of post punk and gothic rock, band and album is one of those finds which you hope for but rarely get over the course of a year, an encounter which connects with primal instincts and personal passion with a recognisable sound explored and twisted into a new distinct adventure. There is plenty to intrigue and ignites ears of those without a post punk/gothic bent to their preferences though, incendiary melodies and rhythmic tenacity as prevalent as the core sound driving the release. It is a tremendous proposition and one to put the band in a firmly attentive spotlight.

Emerging from the ‘ashes’ of the members previous band which released a self-produced EP and played several gigs around Italy, Secret Sight was formed earlier this year and took little time to start working on their first release and debut Day.Night.Life. Consisting of vocalist Matt Schipsi, guitarist Cristiano Poli, bassist Lucio Cristino, and drummer Enrico Bartolini, the Ancona quartet linked up with Paolo Rossi to record the album at Studio Waves in Pesaro. Released on Red Cat Records it is fair to say that as young as Secret Sight is as a band, there is an experience and maturity which shines from obviously the member’s previous endeavours within what is a quite striking introduction to the band.

The release opens with Conquest and instantly has ears and appetite tight in its grasp as the bass of Cristino sets a dark and flavoursome coaxing in motion from within a subdued sonic squall around thumping rhythms from Bartolini. It is a4203391273_2an irresistible lure reminiscent of Leitmotiv and Joy Division, especially once the drama of the guitars and throaty tones of Schipsi join the infectious aural narrative. With a voice somewhere between Ian Curtis and Nick Cave, the frontman is a captivating shadow to the feisty but dark beauty coating the virulent energy and hook littered grooves of the song. It is a tremendous start to the album, and early pinnacle swiftly matched by Earth Overflows. With new wave seeded melodies flirting with the cold steely glare of bass amidst the song’s chilled atmosphere, it is a captivating and eagerly striding encounter. Every element of band and song casts a contagious hex without defusing the haunting resonance and cavernous emotion of the mouth-watering proposition. It many ways the track is like Interpol meets Bauhaus or maybe more so Tones on Tail, a web of scintillating sonic grooves and virulent rhythms entwined with a cold post punk voracity.

The pair of Under This Truth and Life keeps the exceptional charge and majesty of the album going, the first another melodic flirtation with a She Wants Revenge like vivacity and catchiness but exploring a heavier and imposing landscape than its predecessors. Again it is hard to ignore the pleasing Joy Division whispers but also there is a Play Dead and Public Image Ltd spicery, though it should be reinforced that despite the references Secret Sight weaves a sound which is familiar yet openly fresh and uniquely gripping. The second of the two takes a slower gait to its entrance, punchy rhythms from Bartolini leading the imagination into the waiting web of bass and guitar temptation. Though beats make a forceful energetic stride, sonically the track is a more reserved wash but no less inciting in the intriguing melodic and caustic designs of Poli and the pungent ensnaring lures spawned by Cristino.

The bassist again springs the first seduction of Indelible, an enticing swiftly enhanced and fuelled by the grooves and hooks spicing up the exceptional track. Schipsi stands powerfully over the brewing contagion of the song with his raw and starkly emotive tones but it is the bass bait and acidic strands of guitar ingenuity which sets the biggest fire. As in all the songs there is a cinematic drama which is as equally persuasive and engrossing, the following Need an instant example at this point, its noir cloaked almost sinister breath and intrigue a delicious spark for ears, feet, and imagination.

The album is completed by the similarly visually suggestive Long Line and the slightly Sister of Mercy-esque If You Turn, both songs resourcefully provocative and elegantly structured within their roaming lyrical and sonic shadows. The first has a sultry twang to its climatic presence and voice whilst the closing song ebbs and flows with intensity and energy as its masterful soundscape explores the corners and depths of dark emotions and melodic intimacy. It is arguably the most involved and exploratory track on the album and just as irresistible and explosive as those before it.

Day.Night.Life is a must for all post punk/gothic rock fans, and for us a definite favourite of 2014. There is little more to say than just go treat yourselves.

Day.Night.Life is available now from Red Cat Records @ http://www.amazon.co.uk/Day-Night-Life-Secret-Sight/dp/B00NODLP1I/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1412691294&sr=8-1&keywords=Day.Night.Life+Secret+Sight

https://www.facebook.com/secretsight

RingMaster 07/10/2104

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Jubilee Courts – Go From the Blue Light into the Moonlight

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As shoegaze seems to be pushing its boundaries in sound and intensity, UK band Jubilee Courts add their own striking and tantalising slice of sonic climate with the Go From the Blue Light into the Moonlight EP. Holding five tracks which are as sultry as they are invasively seductive, the release brings a delicious merger of eighties post punk and psychedelically fuelled shoegaze with an incendiary and modern sonic rapacity. It makes for a proposition which carries a potently inciting familiarity but equally a uniquely fresh and provocative enticement.

Hailing from Northampton, Jubilee Courts was formed in 2011 by vocalist/guitarist Josh Falconer, guitarist Matt Bradstreet, and bassist/vocalist Harry Boyde. Soon building up a potent reputation with their live presence around their hometown and surrounding areas, the current line-up was completed with the addition of drummer Frank Robertson-Marriott. Drawing on inspirations from the likes of My Bloody Valentine, The Jesus and Mary Chain, Bauhaus, and Joy Division musically, T S Elliott and Delmore Schwartz lyrically, the band laid down a wider stretching lure with the Stalkers Records released single Room with a View at the end of 2013. Mixed by Temples frontman James Bagshaw, the track pushed the band into a fuller spotlight which Go From the Blue Light into the Moonlight is sure to intensify. The band’s first EP is a thick and hazy adventure in breath and sound yet one which infuses at times a minimalistic intimacy and seductive romance to its ambient and melodic explorations, turning the imagination on its head whilst nagging with a monotone and humdrum persistence. Each song is an interpretation of life, an emotional and mental flirtation from which thoughts and senses find healthy inspiration.

City Flow brings the release to life, its initial sonic wind an attention taking intro from which a lone guitar begins teasing thoughts. Its melodic lead is swiftly accompanied by the dark shadows of the bass and the discord kissed vocals of Jubilee-Courts1-450x450Falconer. It is a raw and haunted enticement which instantly brings thoughts of The Jesus and Mary Chain and early Cure as the song wraps its evocative texture and sonic suggestion around the senses. Eventually the air and turbulence of the scenery increases, guitars creating a tension soaked flaming across bolder and broader rhythmic rumblings. It is a glorious start matched by the cacophonous beauty of Something Different. The again discord fuelled tempest which brings the song into view enslaves attention and appetite but soon makes way for a melody closely related to that within its predecessor, its niggling beckoning rich and irresistible. It too is only a moment in the journey of the track, a surf rock like stream of warmth and sonic acidity immersing ears in a sultry blaze. The instrumental is pure mesmerism, an inescapable soundscape through which the compelling dark bass lure of Boyde coldly tempers an escalating aural sunspot.

The startling entrance of the album is just as impressively continued by Outside Your House, its opening bait a heavy footed and slightly fuzzy bass prowl which is soon aligned to a percussive stomp and a ridiculously addictive guitar hook. A disorientating dance breaks out within the rhythms soon after, not for the first or last time Jubilee Courts binding a melodic elegance and smoothness with a seemingly disorganised and agitated but skilfully crafted contrast of ideation. There is always a rich essence of My Bloody Valentine to songs but here hints of bands like Birdland and Wire similarly add their suggestive whispers. The track continues to lay tender yet imposing melodic and sonic tendrils around the ears as the bass finds its darkest side yet to spark another wave of hunger for the EP which is matched to a lesser but still rich degree by Under the Sand Again. The song is the cloudiest of all on the release, its smoky air and turbulent weave of sonic trespass an insatiable pressure. Throughout though melodic veining shines pleadingly from within the thick atmosphere whilst vocally Falconer resonates and smoulders with his great unpolished tones. It is a heady mix but eventually clarity does free itself as the song builds to a fiery climax. The song is also one which misses that final spark which brings other tracks to bear so addictively on the passions.

The release saves its best proposal till the end, in the riveting and scintillating shape of Sunday Shift. A surf bred line of sonic irresistibility entwines itself around ears and imagination from its first breath, taking the initial lead as suggestive rhythms and a second strand of melodic toxicity rapidly add their spice. There is also fullness to the still minimalistic intent of the track which bounds across the senses but this time with every aspect finding its own clear voice in the entrancing weave. Providing an enthralling and nostalgic post punk temptation in its chilled hooks and rhythms as well as vocally, the track unveils an aural alchemy which even with its rich eighties flavouring and inspiration is innovative and virulently addictive.

To describe the music of Jubilee Courts thoughts of My Bloody Valentine and The Jesus and Mary Chain, as well as Joy Division are unavoidable but to that essences of The Horrors, Wire, Crispy Ambulance, and Artery come into the mix. The band has though forged a sound and release in Go From the Blue Light into the Moonlight which stands alone in presence as it gives an impressive and thrilling twist to shoegaze.

The Go From the Blue Light into the Moonlight EP is available now.

http://jubileecourts.com/

9/10

RingMaster 04/08/22014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Tim Paris – Dancers

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Dancers is the ideal title for the debut album from London based Parisian Tim Paris, each of its tracks whether an open flirtation or a more chilled proposition, a vibrant adventurous waltz. Better known as one half of It’s a Fine Line with Ivan Smagghe, Paris has sculpted songs which pull the imagination into unpredictable and vivacious soundscapes. Each one is distinct and stands alone in the tapestry of the release but have a symbiotic union which provides one refreshingly inventive landscape for senses and emotions to bask in. Dancers ebbs and flows in success across its body it is fair to say but only to waiver within a constant magnetic seduction which never relinquishes its strength.

As renowned for his remix invention which has seen him reinterpreting invention from the likes of The XX, Femi Kuti, Battant, Au Revoire Simone, Ewan Pearson, and Tiga, the DJ, producer, and musician now unleashes his own electronic alchemy through the album, merging the purest essences of synth pop, new wave, post punk, electronica, disco, house, and much more for transfixing and evocative aural climates. Dancers provides insights into richly flavoursome cinematic scenes but also ones which have an intimacy which goes beyond voyeurism to draw the listener emotionally into the imaginative investigations. Featuring a wealth of guests, the album is also a collaborative affair embraced by the creative ingenuity of Paris.

Opening track Golden Ratio strides boldly in on punchy beats and an electro tinkling which reminds instantly of Love Cats by The Cure Tim Paris - Dancersthough it takes little time to show its own distinct tease to the coaxing. The song then infuses intriguing melodic lures which do not nestle easily within the established pulse of the song but only accentuates the awakening potency. Featuring Georg Levin of Wahoo, the song opens up warm arms of melody bred enticement and smooth vocal expression which are themselves veined by intriguing twists of enterprise and electronic investigation. The post punk strict rhythmic heartbeat steers the journey allowing thoughts to take in the radiant sights and absorbing atmosphere. It is an adventure which midway takes a breath to return with an even more masterful hold on the appetite, a case of absence making the heart grow fonder.

The enticing start is matched by Rain which sees the guest appearance of Coco Solid of the Parallel Dance Ensemble. The song drips slightly chilled riffs down upon the ear whilst a rhythmic shuffle hurries across the senses. It is another alluring start given extra drama by the skirting dark throated bass, the combination building a striking premise which is enriched further by the cyber kissed vocal narrative. The repetitive spine of the track bewitches constantly; the stark core holding Joy Division/Bauhaus like predation around which the elegant and mesmeric call of the song spreads and croons.

The metallic breath of Outback, Stones & Vinyl soaks the ears next, the initial caress of the song courting a John Foxx essence which never leaves the infectious persuasion. As the track explores its seductive canvas, building and colouring the imagination with inspiring textures, the instrumental toys with the senses further, stretching its provocative enveloping with an additional Bill Nelson like invention. Like standing on a heaven lit cliff top whilst warm winds and sights wrap rivetingly around the senses, the song puts the listener in a hypnotic almost meditative emotional trance.

The following Minireich which features Sex Judas and Rupert Cross and Disco Ellipse both create a transfixing dancefloor bred temptation, though the pair tantalise and shimmer in their enticement rather than leap upon the eagerness of feet. The first has a definite Yello feel to its mischievous invention, vocally and in the devilish temptation offered whilst its successor is a cybernetic tango, flashing sonics and dazzling electronics spraying their bait around before the emotive weave of distressed melodies and restrained bedlam make their play successfully for the passions. Those nor the next up Unsung Deaf Hero fire up the same intensity of hunger and thrills as the opening songs but all captivate and refuse to release the album’s hold, the third of the trio a smothering wash of thick ambiences and funk spawned vocals casting a dark dance of inciting suggestiveness and mystery.

Dancers is back to dominating senses and mind with the outstanding drama of The Grip. With Ben Shemie, Paris lays a noir bred sinister atmosphere within which guitar and rhythms stalk the imagination, the encounter a soundtrack which could easily grace any caped crusader or futuristic darkly shadowed enigma. All the tracks allow the mind to run riot with their aural paint but this more than most conjures up stories and emotions to intoxicatingly bask in.

You’ll Never Know also creates a tenebrous encounter to immerse within, it’s again noir crafted riddle an imposing and incendiary fuse for an adventurous mind to run with whilst ears welcome the varied vocal hues and electronic weaves. It is a blend which is just as alluring in the slightly lighter Extreme Nails, its celestial stroll within a heavy but slow rhythmic frame a beacon for the listener to explore in their own design. Shadows as across most tracks are never far away with their tempering relish though they have to take more of a backseat within the fruity exploits of Heaven Parking which again sees Sex Judas involved. There is a subdued but visible lunacy to the song which brings thoughts of the eighties Martin Atkins band Brian Brain. It is a thrilling revelry which steps aside for the equally delicious Backseat Reflexion to close the album. The song sees Forrest joining Paris in a last irresistible seduction, electronics and melodies aligning within a shadow built emotional seduction.

It is a masterful end to a similarly consummate release, Dancers offering a collection of emotive and provocative vignettes which absorb thoughts and passions like a sponge for exhilarating experiences and adventures. Apart from the length of a few tracks stretching their staying power to clutch at straws in an attempt to temper the enthusiasm, Tim Paris has provided his finest hour with his own solo release, the first of many we hope and suspect.

Dancers is available on 2 x 12″ vinyl, CD, and download right now via My Favorite Robot Records.

http://www.facebook.com/djtimparis

9/10

RingMaster 12/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Tracings of time and reflections: an interview with Black Space Riders

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German heavy rockers Black Space Riders is a band which has persistently drawn acclaim and attention with their unique and ravenously adventurous sounds but it is fair to say that new album D:REI is their finest moment. A journey of progressively sculpted metal and psychedelically forged rock through a dramatic narrative, the bands third full-length is a compelling incitement for the imaginations and passions. We grabbed the chance to find out more with JE and Seb from the band, touching on origins, albums, and much more…

Hello and thanks for talking with us.

Hello and thank YOU, here are JE (vocals, guitars) and SEB (vocals) from Black Space Riders

For newcomers to the band, please tell us about its beginnings.

JE: Black Space Riders were born in the deepest winter of 2008/09. C.RIP (drums) and I wanted to play Heavy Rock again after some years of making decent songwriter-stuff. I contacted SLI (guitar), an old friend from the schoolyard, we had been doing a NWOBHM-fanzine together when we were teens around 79/80. He brought in SAQ (bass) and we started jamming in an old mouldered bowling alley. It was great from the start. Fantastic musical and social chemistry! We created 4 songs in 2 rehearsals. We recorded our debut in 2010 and played shows while writing material for album No.2, “Light is the new black”, which was released in 2012.

SEB: In 2012 I came across and joined Black Space Riders first as an additional and background singer, then as the 5th member. But I already had known these guys years before.

JE: Now there are 5 Riders, 5 friends, just been releasing album No.3 called D:REI.

What are the musical histories of the band members before Black Space Riders?

JE: All of us have been playing in many bands or projects before. SLI played in Heavy-, Punk- and Indie-Bands since the Eighties. SAQ had a couple of Punk Rock bands before but also played in Indie-Rock-Bands, SEB used to sing in Metal bands but also has a great experience in playing accordion and singing weird, folkloristic Chanson-Stuff together with C.RIP who played and plays every imaginable musical style from Jazz over Metal to Ska. I also played in a lot of bands since 1980. Metal, Rock, Wave, Punk, Indie, Folk, Jazz … I played and sung for a long time in a Crossover band with C.RIP, which gained a decent regional/national awareness in the Nineties.

What was the spark or initial intent within the band when you started out?Black Space Riders 3

JE: As said, to create something loud and wild after years of “decent” music and to take up the Heavy stuff that we all are loving since our youth. The idea was to jam around and to create a hypnotic wall of sound … there were no ideas of releasing albums in the beginning

The band’s name stands out and suggests a space ranger like almost comic book appeal. What inspired the band name?

JE: Exactly what you have read in the name. 60ies and 70ies Sci-Fi had a very strong influence on me. I read a lot of those books when I was a child, my uncle had hundreds of them. We were looking for a name which can instantly create cartoonish, dark, hypnotic, psychedelic and cool images.

How would you say your sound has evolved since the early days and your self-titled debut album to what we thrillingly hear on new release D:REI?

JE: This time when we entered the recording studio we knew even better what we wanted and what we did NOT want. As for the sound of the recording itself: we wanted to retain the warmth, the organic live-feeling and the bottom of the first two albums but wanted to add additional freshness, transparency and openness to our existing drive. So – for example – we have been discussing a lot about the amount of “attack” in the drum sound or about guitar amps  and how to record the guitars with our friend and engineer Role (“die Tonmeisterei”) before entering the studio. Stylistically we allowed ourselves to integrate more elements and accepted the eclectic result of our songwriting without sorting out parts, grooves or ideas that sounded a little bit far out in the beginning.

As you said earlier D:REI is your third album; for us an exceptional progressively sculpted metal and rock adventure which can seduce and prey on the senses at any given moment. Did the album end up exactly how you envisaged it or did it have some surprises in store for even you guys as it evolved and emerged?

SEB: There are, in fact, some positive surprises for us. Partial tiny, audiophile little things – but also relevant structural changes we have made during the recordings.

JE: There are always surprises in the studio. The songs and arrangements are final before entering the studio, but then you begin experimenting with sounds or somebody within the band or let´s say our engineer Role has a charming “new” idea and – oooops –you find yourself changing the master plan. We are a live-recording band, old-school, five friends and all their instruments and amps in ONE room … but sometimes  we are adding some decent flavours later … experimenting with dozens of effect-pedals and creating some “space” can be so inspiring almost addictive! We are also experimenting with our vocal expression while recording, encouraging and coaching each other.

1545083_10151894936042963_1727001018_nThe album is split into ‘chapters’ exploring a…actually could you tell and expand on the theme behind the album for us please?

SEB: A new life in a new world? The depths and abysses of the human soul? Find out for yourself !

JE: On the first look a post-apocalyptic plot of destruction, escape, voyage and looking back. But maybe it´s all just in your head and it´s all about inner liberation and freedom?! The listener is defining the meaning of the story. My advice: Take a look at the story and the lyrics (you will find them here: www.blackspaceriders.com/d-rei), then put on your headphones, lights out, volume up and find it out!

Did the lyrical aspect or idea of the album come first or the music?

SEB: We had framework for about the half of the songs when JE delighted us with his concept of “Total destruction as the root of a new beginning and the Journey as a transformation”. From this point concept and music were evolved in parallel.

JE: Music first, basic concept next, lyrics last.

How does the writing process work within Black Space Riders?

SEB: On the way from our debut album Black Space Riders to D:REI we have expanded  the common songwriting.

JE: The process of songwriting has changed over the years. In the beginning I brought in almost finished songs and structures. Today it´s “just“ a riff or some harmonies, somebody picks it up, we start jamming and then we love it or we don´t. At one point SEB and me are starting to hum or sing. We are recording every rehearsal, every jam and are listening to it before the next rehearsal. We then discuss about it and try out different grooves, tempi, atmospheres, sounds. Our drummer C.RIP is playing a big part in arranging songs and developing structures…So the “song” as you know it from the album, is a common work of several band members.

Being a concept album did you approach the writing of D:REI any differently to say previous album Light Is The New Black?

JE: Not really. Light is the new black was considered by many to be a concept album as well. But D:REI seems to be so perfectly balanced and cohering, both musically and lyrically. To be honest: that is a happy ending and not a result of a worked out master plan. We have changed the sequence of the songs several times to find the perfect flow through the whole album … so we had to fiddle around with song titles and lyrics in the last moment during the recordings.

What did you take into the recording of D:REI in particular which you learnt on previous releases to enhance or ease its emergence in the studio?

JE: As said above … a clearer vision about the desired sound, recording techniques, approach and modus operandi. Additionally a greater open-mindedness, a grown faith, trust and friendship within the band and with our engineer/producer … relaxation and a strong belief that this album was going to become something special.

With a concept album is there a more demanding and intensive focus needed to link music and the expanding lyrical story of the narrative or does it pretty much come together as any other album?

SEB: I find it even a little easier because I had a specific movie in my head since the said date.

And is another concept album a possibility for future releases or maybe with the next will you return to individual standalone songs?

SEB: Anything can be, nothing must be.

JE: … all is possible. No plans, no expectations, no disappointments ;)

Have you shows/tour in the works to support D:REI, and if so will you be rampaging around Europe, the UK maybe?Black Space Riders 2

JE: Yes we have played some release-shows in some of the bigger German cities and are working on more shows and festival-slots in 2014. We are doing all this on our own. We have a distro and some professional help in the background, but in order to keep our independency and all rights… no label-contract! So most of the work, organization and booking is up to us. Additionally we all have families and jobs. It seems as though our new album, D:REI, will be received very well, so with that kind of “tailwind” we are starting now to book more shows for 2014 and will hopefully be able to play some festivals in the summer as well. Would love to play some shows in the UK, but we don´t have an “official” distro or label in the UK … so I guess we have to wait for some nice offers to play the UK.

Rightly or wrongly I have the assumption that you are a band which never stops writing or working on ideas, if correct how far are you into writing album 4? ;)

SEB: Honestly we have just a few ideas or fragments, because we were very busy with the preparation of our release-shows. But the prickling is already there and I’m looking forward to the upcoming rehearsals.

 Once again many thanks for sharing time with us, any last thoughts to leave us with?

JE: If you like what we are doing … tell the world about it! Spread the word! May the force be with you!

And lastly what are our biggest inspirations not so much for Black Space Riders but just as musicians?

JE: Of course each of us has different inspirations that is why we sound like we sound. On the other hand we have a lot of common preferences – and again – that is why we sound like we sound. Band-favourites are e.g. Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, NWOBHM, The Chameleons, Motorhead, Monster Magnet, Alice in Chains, Massive Attack … many more. For me personally on top of those: Psychedelia like on the early Pink Floyd –Albums. 80ies Dark Wave like Bauhaus or Joy Division and the BIG three: David Bowie, Tom Waits and Johnny Cash.

Read the D:REI review @ http://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/01/23/black-space-riders-drei/

http://www.blackspaceriders.com

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 12/02/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

Venus DeVilo – Edgar Allan Ho EP

venus devile 2

Let us introduce you to the dark seductiveness of Venus DeVilo, an artist which preys on the passions like a sultry vampiric temptress bred from artistic alchemy raised from the fire of Imelda May, the snarl of Wanda Jackson, the energy of Fay Fife, and the devilry of Dick Venom, not forgetting a pinch of the infected essences of Horrorpops. Her creative world is one of shadowed carnivals, blood drenched burlesques, and dead borne vaudeville; her music pure sexual fascination and the Edgar Allan Ho EP the perfect introduction to the temptress before the arrival of her debut album Til Death Do Us Party, which we hope will see daylight in the near future, such the hunger now raging.

Hailing from the cemeteries of Dublin, Ireland, well probably a very nice comfortable abode but that hardly goes with the theme does it, Venus since 2011 has frequented and lit up rock/metal bars, Burlesque and Cabaret nights, open mic nights, and other numerous venues around her home city and much further across the country with her Goth-Shock anthems. The host of a series of popular horror themed gigs at the Twisted Pepper, Dublin which have become an almost monthly event, the sonic siren has captured the imagination of the internet media with her dramatic sounds, becoming the favourite sister of the likes of Elegant Savages webzine and the Bone Orchard podcast. Since its release the Edgar Allan Ho EP has drawn lustful attention and it is hard not to understand why as it stalks the minds darkest imagination and cinematic desires.

    Heartless Horseman steps up to tempt the passions first, its initial acoustic guitar stabs and instantly potent vocals the 602969_406666232785880_346571255_nentrance into lyrical and musical stalking of night terrors and their romantic suasion. There is a rockabilly feel to the song which reminds of The Creepshow whilst the excellent soaring vocal imagination and drama of its delivery brings thoughts of Agnete Kjølsrud and the band Djerv as well as Dominique Lenore Persi and Stolen Babies. Unafraid to twist and turn the gait and intent of the track, Venus also sends it into angular and less accessible turns which make suggestions of Lene Lovich. For all the references we offer though, do not make the mistake of assuming the sound of Venus DeVilo is not something quite unique to the graveyard walking beguiler.

The following Apocalips equally enthrals with predominantly acoustic guitar and vocals, though rhythms and bass prowl with devilment in their hearts and wide mischief on their grinning lips too. The song sways and swaggers with the wantonness of a fifties siren and the intimidating composure of instinctive rockabilly, but like the band references these pointers to the sound are only whispers of the full hue of flavours making up the wholly contagious shards of mesmeric aural delight.

Penny Dreadful Love is a song you know should play in the bowels of any mausoleum, its funeral caress punctured and kissed by the again outstanding voice and delivery of its creator. As the lady and song lace the senses and thoughts with their visceral evocation, Venus provokes another comparison, this time to Lesley Woods of Au Pairs in the way she at times slaps words and syllables into the ear. It is a style that is impossible to resist and one which makes the forthcoming album so exciting and this song a dark hearted romantic serenade.

The best song on the release comes with Ringmaster, and no we were not biased in our decision. The vibrant waltz of the colourful enchantment goes hand in hand with the dark carnivale touch, guitar and vocals swinging across the high tented air of the hypnotic mystique and elegant poise. It makes for a glorious soaring flight of theatrical imagination honed into a glorious sirenesque aural spectacular which leads the listener on a tightrope walk of tension and astounding adventure, and note for extra spice its core call around the chorus is a dead ringer for one of the greatest songs ever, Killer Klowns From Outer Space by The Dickies.

The release is completed by firstly Carmilla’s Return, a song which initially has the shadow clouded  ambience reminiscence of Bauhaus song Bela Lugosi’s Dead  and goes on to atmospherically swarm around the ear with the chants of the ‘dead’ harmonising behind the continually powerful and virulently enticing tones of Venus. Once more it is a song which transports you within the sweeping sinister mists of a cinematic painting whilst its successor Miss Frankenstein is simply an epidemically catchy romp with big bold rhythms shaping the cage you are enslaved within. It has a delicious toxicity which leaves you no option but to throw voice and feet into the twisted majesty.

Venus DeVilo is an artist who will scare as many as she seduces but one who will only ever leave a lingering mark in her shadow and if it is anything like the Edgar Allan Ho EP, this dank earth will be a better place.

https://www.facebook.com/VenusDeViloSongsFromTheStalkersPointOfView

10/10

RingMaster 24/07/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Sinezamia: La Fuga

Foto di P.Rubini

Foto di P.Rubini

Despite one frustration arising from it, La Fuga (The Escape) the debut album from Italian gothic rock band Sinezamia is a rather tasty shadowed delight. Fusing dark rock with new wave and post punk, the Mantova quintet has created an album which is perpetually enthralling with its often nostalgia inspiring sounds and emotive breath. From an initially absorbing first impression it also grows into a presence which is hard to tear oneself from though once you do it is arguably not as memorable in hindsight as you expect. In its company though it is a thoroughly pleasing and exciting release.

That frustration mentioned at the start is actually surprising. Usually there is never an issue with bands singing in their native tongue, in fact very often it adds something extra emotively, but on La Fuga it left one feeling out in the cold a little, like missing out on the secret you are meant to support without knowing its content. Despite that the album leaves only satisfaction and welcomed intrigue amongst thoughts and emotions.

Formed in 2004, Sinezamia began finding a shape and stronger response to their well-received dark wave/rock sounds from 2006 which elevated with the release of their debut EP Fronde the following year. Media and fans took to the release with eagerness and the band began pulling in more to their fan base through touring. With a new line-up in 2009 the band recorded their second EP Sacralità which was released to strong success and interest from the print media and radio not forgetting an ever increasing legion of fans. As a foretaste of what was to come from La Fuga, the single off of it Ombra came out in 2011 to fire up anticipation for what has emerged as a very impressive debut full length.

The album has a grip on the passions immediately with opener Ghiaccio Nero (translated as Black Ice), the breath of synths and sinezamia-la-fugathe pulsating velvet clad bassline an instant infectious lure. Within seconds one is reminded of The Cure around their second and third albums with the contagious melodic hooks of Leitmotiv. The bass of Marco Beccari is irresistible within the weaves of sonic elegance from the keys of Charles Henry Scaietta and the teasing guitar play of Federico Bonazzoli. Into its stride with the great vocals of Marco Grazzi at their expressive might the track shifts into the darker aural shadows of Bauhaus to leave one even more magnetically drawn to the track. It is an excellent start instigating memories and pleasures from a few decades ago with a fresh touch.

The title track is a harder straight forward encounter of rock n roll with the rhythms of drummer Stephen Morbini leading the muscular passage with skill and tight control. The song still leads the ear into beckoning dark corners but lacks the mesmeric charm of the first though instead offers a bite which not only shows a good diversity to the music of the band but entraps a willing attention with ease.

     Nella Distanza opens on a slow haunting bass resonance before expanding into a sultry presence with a tight irresistible serpentine hook. The track took time to get to terms with, musically it is a smouldering wash of elegance and energetic passion but accosted by the initial distraction of the vocals of Grazzi. It is obviously down to personal taste but his slow almost spoken delivery send the song slightly awry and startlingly out of place compared to what came before. Thankfully it is only until he surges into his full singing range where you can only be impressed, his heart driven tones as powerful and thrilling as the constant musical imagination. Being selfish one only hopes he avoids this slow walking delivery in the future, but that is just one lone view of course.

The album continues to excite but when the aforementioned single arrives it just sends shards of rapture through the senses.  Ombra (Shadow) is sensational, a song which is like a beacon for the heart, especially if the likes of Leitmotiv and Play Dead hold a place in the emotions from times past. With a persistent sonic tease and boisterous energy around the ever inciting caresses of the keys, the track commands body, thoughts, and emotions like a sonic temptress. It is the best track on the album though matched by the closing triumph Nebbia di Guerra (Fog of War). It too is an insatiable wash of melodic elegance and almost raptorial energy from guitars and rhythms section speared by contagious carnivalesque teasing and sultry wantonness. Like a cross between Sex Gang Children and the poppier touches of The Danse Society it is a final act of magnificence from a simply stunning release.

If the heady times of the older bands mentioned do things to your little blood pumping organ than Sinezamia and La Fuga are a must.

https://www.facebook.com/sinezamia

RingMaster 19/12/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright