This Devastated Fan – Plot And Debauchery

This Devastated Fan Promo shot

This week sees the re-release of Plot And Debauchery, the debut album of UK alternative rock band This Devastated Fan. It is a captivating album which certainly deserves another airing before the ears of the nation, its offering of thirteen evocative and passionate songs a compelling brew of invention and melodic persuasion. Nicely varied and impressively sculpted the release takes emotions and thoughts on a magnetic ride through heart bred adventures, and though arguably it fails to ignite the passions enough times to be classed as a classic introduction, it leaves satisfaction and pleasure the overriding emotion within a fuelled hunger towards the stylish songwriting and presentation of the quartet.

Formed in 2006, the current line-up of brothers vocalist/guitarist Robbie and drummer Jamie Cavanagh, guitarist Will Rogers, and bassist Steve Alday has spent the past 18 months hitting the UK and Europe hard with their live shows which has seen them play alongside the likes of Public Image Limited and The Birthday Suit. With a sound which seemingly combines inspirations from the likes of Manchester Orchestra, Alexisonfire, Biffy Clyro, and Idlewild in to something fresh and potent, the album has the richness and promise to exploit the stronger awareness and stature of the band this time around.

From the opener Shoulder The War, band and release grabs attention with ease, the song itself a smouldering persuasion that deals in This Devastated Fan Cover Artworktender emotions and passionate crescendos rife with incisive guitar work, firm rhythms and the excellent vocals of Robbie Cavanagh. There is a great niggle to the throat of the bass too which tempers and compliments the melodic flames honed by the guitars, it all combining to create a track thick with expression and enterprise. It is a strong start which fluidly evolves into Calvery Cemetery, NYC; another song where gentle coaxing from sound and vocals leads to multiple climaxes of explosive passion and melodic fire. Lyrically the band has a depth and impact which talks thoughts and feelings into creating reflective connections, and certainly this track creates richly hued scenery for their narratives.

Through the more than decent REM like Contingency Plan, the album reaches higher pinnacles with the pair of aural beacons, Sounds Like Sirens and Bambi Woods. The first of the two is a mesmeric beckoning with whispers of Green Day and Brand New to its warm brew of tangoing rhythms, melodic charm, and teasing basslines. Once again the band proves themselves majestic in creating infectious hotspots and choruses within songs, here the brighter burn of melodies and tantalising lures striking and tempting to secure a place in the rapidly growing hunger for the album. Its successor is an excellent blend of hard rock sinew and taunting indie rock feistiness, the result a song that swaggers with a firm prod of confrontation and riveting invention leaving senses and emotions leaping to join its pleasing canter.

The likes of the enflamed An Assembly Of Witches, the closely hugging Carnivore, and the slightly sinister Conversation Killer, wrap the ear and thoughts in weaves of passion and emotional colour, each track and across the whole album to be honest, dripping with incandescent heart and inciting personal observation. Though the songs fail to make the same lingering impact as some of the earlier tracks they all leave a welcome bait in place for a return, the last of the three and the impressive Murder which lies amongst them, creative fascinations that hook you back to the album and ignites the appetite with skilled and instinctive majesty. The same can be said of Barricade, a track which has a feel of Placebo to its steely yet mellow sonic claws and melodic engrossment.

Completed by the final emotive call of the ballad Heathen Rage, the album is a vibrant coaxing which defies any real criticism even if it fails to send the passions into overload as much as it probably should have. Plot And Debauchery is so full of promise and imagination though that you feel it will only be a matter of time before This Devastated Fan creates that undeniable classic. Watch this eager space we say whilst enjoying a rather satisfying album.

http://www.tdfhq.co.uk/

8/10

RingMaster 12/08/2013

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THIS DEVASTATED FAN set to reveal some ‘Plot And Debauchery’, on 12th August.

This Devastated Fan Promo shot

UK ALT-CREW THIS DEVASTATED FAN REBOOT NEW ALBUM THIS SUMMER!

Taking the artistry of Manchester Orchestra, the emotive drive of Alexisonfire, and the glowing diversity of Coheed and Cambria, This Devastated Fan showcase a sound that pitches impressive dynamic variation with earnest song-writing. The band are now set to plough their way to the upper echelons of the UK music scene with the re-release of their new album ‘Plot And Debauchery’, out Monday 12th August.
Hailing from the North West, alternative foursome This Devastated Fan were originally formed back in 2006, but the current and now permanently stable line-up consists of blood brothers Robbie and Jamie Cavanagh on Vocals/Guitar and Drums, respectively, Will Rogers on Guitar and Steve Alday completing the band on bass. Based at their very own rehearsal space and office in Wigan, endearingly titled ‘TDF HQ’, the band work diligently to perfect their craft and it’s started to reap its rewards. The diligent quartet are making new friends and pathways, and for the past 18 months have launched a savage attack on the UK and Europe, playing shows from the North to the South and chalking up supports with ‘Public Image Limited’ and ‘The Birthday Suit’ along the way.
This Devastated Fan also have a steady recording output and are now poised to reboot their latest album. Recorded at TDFHQ studios, the band’s third release, ‘Plot and Debauchery, encompasses TDF’s live energy whilst maintaining a superior quality complete with a polished sound. From the chugging rhythms and dynamic flavourings of ‘Shoulder The War’ through to the animated angular rock of ‘Bambi Woods’, and to the ambient beauty of ‘Heathen Rage’, the rising alternative crew have put together a record that packs thirteen killer cuts. The band are now braced for nationwide recognition as they tour for the remainder of this year and beyond!
This Devastated Fan Cover Artwork
== THIS DEVASTATED FAN RE-RELEASE ‘PLOT AND DEBAUCHERY’ ON MONDAY 12th AUGUST ==

Fly This For Me: Making Shadows EP

Bringing a much needed muscular invention to the genre of pop punk /melodic punk, UK band Fly This For Me unleash their debut Making Shadows EP to excite and enthuse the ear. Well crafted the four track release is brought with a punk hunger driven by an expansive rock energy and intelligence to incite not only an immediate strong impression but also formidable promise for the future.

Guildford based, Fly This For Me officially formed in the closing blinks of 2011, with members which have their seeds across the UK. Already with a sound on the evidence of the EP which is fresh and evolved beyond just infectious easy to swallow hooks and unbridled keen riffs, the quintet has persistently lit up stages shared with the likes of Blitz Kids, Feed the Rhino, Lost Boys, Marines, Eager Teeth, fiN, and POLAR. It has been a constant garnering of positive responses which with the national release of the EP on July 16th can only accelerate to greater heights and recognition. The release has already been preceded by the video/single Making Shadows taken from the EP released in April, the sparks of acclaim it inspired ready to burst into full flame with the unleashing of these four impressive songs.

The release leaps into view with the sparkling She Said, its entrance more subdued than rushed to make a warm invitation which is lined with stirring riffs and provocative melodic beckoning. Vocalist Tim Cowen instantly marks himself as an expressive and powerful aspect of the sound, his emotive lyrical delivery as appealing as the magnetic sounds around him. The guitars of Sean Kelly and George Rockett light the air with skill and invention to bring a full mesmeric body and incendiary atmosphere to the track. Standing somewhere between the likes of Alexisonfire, Mind Museum and a Foo Fighters/Hundred Reasons like combination, the song is a strong trigger to set the senses up for what emerges as even more satisfying pieces of songwriting.

We All Fall Down takes no time in winding the ear around its hard rock veins of power, the drums of Joe Balchin taking charge from the off whilst the bass of Hannah Greenwood ripples with an intensity which though not always as clearly heard as one would wish adds the depth to make the songs impactful and rounded. The song teases and badgers, twisting with further melodic manipulations from the guitars to fire up the emotions whilst the vocals are as earnest as their delivered content.

Title track comes next and amongst the other unmistakably great songs stands as the best. With a discovered urgency to its breath Making Shadows is a controlled riot with the raw and anthemic edge the best punk inspired songs always have. Fully contagious though again without offering the easy infection of simple hooks and easy to consume melodic candy, the track is a feast of energy, invention, and unreserved heart pleasing rock.

The closing Rock Bottom is equally striking with the band returning to a fuller rock body beneath the hungry air of the song. The track evolves within its wall to be as unpredictable as it is siren like, that infectiousness previously mentioned in full reign here though one more without resorting to the easy pick up lines of other less able bands and songs.

Making Shadows EP is a real pleasure which from its initial impressive introduction grows into a real gem the more one engages their time with it. The release also marks Fly This For Me as a band offering not only a bright and promising future for themselves but for UK rock music too.

www.facebook.com/FlyThisForMeUK

RingMaster 06/07/2012

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Fist Full Of Lies: If It Wasn’t For This,I’d Still Have Everything

Explosively stunning the debut EP from post hardcore band Fist Full Of Lies is a startling arrival of a new and real force in UK rock music. Armed with all the essential punk tendencies and attitude you could wish for the Norwich quartet take the post hardcore genre into new exciting storms of sounds and quality. Fresh and eager the band is a breath of new inspiring air and the If It Wasn’t For This, I’d Still Have Everything EP the mightiest of introductions.

Formed in 2010, the foursome of vocalist/guitarist Ben Taylor, guitarist Sam Taylor, bassist Rikki Assuncao, and drummer Ash Griffiths took no time in gaining a responsive attention with a free download track in the same year and subsequent sharing of stages with the likes of Atlas & I, Mishkin, Evarose, Everything Burns, Mallory Knox, and Depth. Taking influences and inspiration from such bands as Alexisonfire, At The Drive-In, Deaf Havana, Avenged Sevenfold, Gallows, and The Bronx, Fist Full Of Lies have forged their own sound and distinct identity which not only sets them apart but fires up the expectations that the band will be a major player in defining future UK rock music.

From the start the EP slaps the senses to attention with the hungry Curses. From a prodding of guitars the song erupts into an agitated brew of plaintive vocals, their delivery as expressive and open as the feisty sounds surrounding them. The beats of Griffiths are like steel jabs, clean yet dominant whilst the bass of Assuncao prowls with a menacing presence amongst the crashing riffs and evocative melodic enterprise. The song courts the ear with heated suggestion and enthused energy to make for a striking and excellent start to the release.

The great start though is shown to be just the beginning as the following I’m Jack’s Lingering Regret stands beating its chest with even greater invention and irresistibility. Thumping rhythms take charge first as the guitars and bass crowd the ear with expansive and beefy sounds. Soon joined by a hypnotic melodic hook to drool over, the song stalks the senses with a punk confrontation to the emerging emotive air. Vocally Ben Taylor is impressive and already marks himself as one of the best new voices to be unleashed this year, his delivery and control a perfect compliment and foil to the sounds and lyrical intent.

Waiting steps up next to keep things just as tight and explosive as those songs leading to its entrance. The track is an unpredictable riot of thought and expression from all departments and with a dual vocal attack at times it ruffles the ear with a rawness which ignites an even deeper enthusiasm for the band. The song alone shows why the band stands out from the crowd, its imagination and desire to venture down initially disguised avenues and enflame the passions as it goes with an anthemic intent is sheer quality.

If It Wasn’t For This, I’d Still Have Everything finishes with Bitterness Got The Better Of Me, a dramatic and dynamic closure to the release with as much ferocity in its bristling walls as arguably on the other songs combined. The track leaves the senses ringing and desperate to feel the force of Fist Full Of Lies immediately again, impassioned and unforgettable its departure the instant trigger for another thrilling engagement.

Fist Full Of Lies has surprised, their sudden and impressive presence from out of nowhere for most of us an unexpected gift and the reassuring declaration that British rock music is not only in safe hands but inspired ones.

https://www.facebook.com/fistfulloflies

RingMaster 03/07/2012

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Kids We Used To Be: And We Would Have Gotten Away With It Too… EP

The And We Would Have Gotten Away With It Too… EP is the debut release from Liverpool pop punk band Kids We Used To Be. Released through Like Records it offers four tracks dripping promise for a band still in evolution. With a hardcore vein bursting through their songs the band whilst not laying down deep scars of originality leaves one anticipating great things ahead once they find their true selves in their sound.

Taking their name from one of their influences Alexisonfire and their song Old Crows, Kids We Used to Be is barely a year old, being formed in the Summer of last year. Consisting of vocalists Ste McEvatt and Carl Gunning, backed by the musical prowess of guitarists James Cremor and Lewis Gardner, bassist Mike Higgins, and Lee Berrill on drums, the sextet use additional flavours from the likes of The Wonder Years, Set Your Goals, Alexisonfire, and Man Overboard, to forge their own not yet distinct but flavoursome sound, the band feeling like one still in transition. They have in their relatively short time already lit up stages alongside bands such as Polar Bear Club, Paige, Kyoto Drive, The Story so Far, Man Overboard, and Decade and set themselves as a band to certainly keep an eye on, something the EP does nothing to suggest otherwise.

30 Down opens up the release with a firm hand of striking melodic strikes and cruising riffs. Gruff brawling shouts going as vocals enter the affray and are fair if unspectacular in what seems to be a growing need for bands to employ this aspect against clean vocals which here are very agreeable and add a balance to their coarse counterpart and the track itself. The song itself is a bruising encounter without unleashing a barrage of aggression which works well with the melodic enterprise from the guitars.

The following Hey Aqualung litters the ear with feisty riffs and firm rhythms in a regular pop punk approach. Again the dual vocals dominate the song predominately though it is no reflection on the strong songwriting and sounds which without being the most imaginative easily satisfy and keep the attention fully engaged. The building crescendos throughout work well and add extra intrigue to what is a good song with an anthemic edge.

By this point the rough vocals feel in need of variety to be honest, the idea of using the twin attack in pop punk is a different aspect but someone simply screaming in the ear is at times too distracting. Against music which at the end of the day is not the most intensified and violent personal taste leaves one to hope there is a reassessment in that department, not a removal but a better definition and diversity.

The best song by far on the EP is Nothing Good Happens After 2AM, a song which alone shows why the suspicion that Kids We Used To Be has a definite strong future ahead is so strong by the end of the release. Easily infectious the song is the most inventive and imaginative track. With the punk urgency which is to an extent lacking elsewhere and a predatory air to its muscular riffs and thumping beats, it shows a band in complete unison and at the top of their current skills. Whether the song is new compared to the others or recorded at a different time we cannot say but in every aspect it is better, in creation, individual delivery, and production. This is the lead song and should be a single to really set the band off on a decisive rise.

Completed by a demo version of Man, I Hate Your Friends which again offers strong assumption the band will make a bigger mark ahead, the And We Would Have Gotten Away With It Too… EP is a more than decent introduction with one song by itself declaring Kids We Used To Be a band who will grab our attention often as they develop. Right now the EP is well worth some of your time, Nothing Good Happens After 2AM worth a persistent entertaining.

https://www.facebook.com/KidsWeUsedToBeOfficial

RingMaster 30/06/2012

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Campus: Empathy

As the windows and doors to your thoughts, emotions, and soul are blasted and virtually shaken off their hinges by Empathy the new EP from Belgian post hardcore band Campus, you know this is one release you are not going to forget in a hurry, or want to. Empathy is immense, a sonic wind tunnel of intensity and aggression veined with inspired invention and melodic enterprise. The enormity of the EP is clear as one lies on the floor grasping for a new breath to chase off the numbness that pervades every sinew as the release signs off from its deeply satisfying four track obliteration of safety.

Released May 28th via Small Town Records, Empathy is destined to ignite passions within a great many more than ever before. With a sound which has traces of bands like Architects, Underoath, and While She Sleeps to its formidable and imaginative creation, the release is the next step on the quest to conquer far afield from their already worshipping homeland. The EP follows their thoroughly acclaimed 2009 album Oh, Comely! which itself followed a well received debut two years before in We Are The Silence. That initial release led them to opening up the Belgian leg of the Taste of Chaos tour of the same year and saw them share stages with the likes of The Used, Rise Against, Aiden and Gallows. Since then they have not looked back as shows and tours with the might of bands like Alexisonfire, Cancer Bats, Parkway Drive, Bring Me The Horizon, Underoath, and Architects filled subsequent years as well as numerous festival appearances.

It is probably fair to say outside of Belgian the band has still to find the heights their music deserves but with an impressive appearance at the Hit The Deck Festival in the UK this year, slots at the Burnout Festival, Hevy Festival, and Skatefest upcoming and most of all with Empathy this feels like the point the rest of the world takes notice.

The release opens up with the title track and within seconds has the senses reeling. As the rhythms of Josse Wijckmans pummel the ear hungry growling riffs prowl with a predatory intensity and overwhelming energy. Vocalist Martijn Leenaerts scowls and unleashes pure venom to match the tumultuous attack. His delivery is persistently varied and an example to many other same genre frontmen that mixing up things is a mighty tool. The guitars of Tijs Mondelaers and Fabrice Parent strip flesh with the sharpest of harsh riffs and energy whilst mesmerising with a melodic invention that leaves blisters seething within the ear. They are openly impressive and again show that thought and diversity can be a weapon of the greatest devastation.

From an impressive start the band raise the bar with Lone Wolf, another track to fly from first note with rampaging energy and dehabilitating effect. As with the first song bassist Tuur Geeraerts is a growling vehement presence bringing the darkest shadows and depth to the songs. Abrasive and provocative the track riles up more than the ear and leaves the first search for air an urgent need.

Downtime is a lumbering brute of a song, its heart, pace, and towering muscle the heaviest on Empathy. It does not neglect the other elements the band does so well neither, offering an impatient groove to wind around the ear with a grip borne of spite and melodic craft to light up the skies of the song like meteor shards, white hot and violently incisive.

The EP closes with the best song within its angry walls in Young Bastard. All the great things that preceded it return in greater heart and intensity. Vindictive, the aggression is lifted to its greatest heights leaving the senses ringing out for mercy and relief but wanting more and more of the same. Within this synapse melting the song explodes with the most infectious groove and clean vocals to ignite flames of primal energy. The track reminds of Red Tape with a twist of Ghost Of A Thousand at times and is easily one of the best tracks heard this year.

If Campus does not breakout to infect the world with their great sounds then justice has never had a place in music but with Empathy the feeling is their time is just shifting up multiple gears. https://www.facebook.com/CAMPUSBE

RingMaster 17/05/2012

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The Villa Rise Interview

Making the long journey from Sydney Australia to relocate in England, hardcore/punk band Villa Rise has immediately marked their arrival with the release of their mighty and impressive debut EP Wastelands. It is a  release consisting of songs that burst with aggressive intensity, dark bulging riffs, thoughtfully crafted melodies. It also shows a band with a full confidence in their sound and skilled in bringing forth a varied and flavoursome array of ideas and sounds. We had the fortunate chance to talk to the band to find out more about Villa Rise, their EP, and reasons for moving thousands of miles?

Hi and welcome to The Ringmaster Review. Thank you for talking with us.

No worries!

Firstly would you introduce the members of the band?

Yeah, we have Jarrod Martin on Vocals, Kyle Usher on Bass, Alex Wood on Drums, Ben Clink and Brendon Fameli of Guitar.

 How did you all meet and what inspired you to start the band?

We all grew up in the same town, and knew each other from school or gigs. Basically we started the band out necessity really, we just knew we wanted to play music.

You recently moved to the UK, a bold and some would say brave move, what was the reasoning for this?

We basically just all came to a point in our lives where we wanted to experience new things and see the world. We were really lucky that all of us wanted to do this sort of thing at the same time, and so naturally the band continued and we were able to bring it with us.

Does the move reflect or say anything about the state of metal back in Australia for new bands?

Well, I guess you can interpret it that way and we’re sure a few people have, but the Australian music scene was really great to us and there are a lot of really talented bands and people doing great things. Being so isolated and so large are unique problems for Australian bands, but we wouldn’t say that that was the real motivation for moving, even if it did play a part.

What were your expectations or hopes before hitting our soil?

Nothing really, we expect a lot from ourselves and we have a pretty high standard of how we try to go about things, but whenever someone says they dig what we do, or whenever we get great opportunities like touring with Silent Screams or playing Ghostfest , it always comes as a bit of a surprise to us, we’re very grateful.

How do you think being here will help or inspire your music?

Well living together and having the freedom to write music at all hours has definitely made an impact, and being here has pretty much changed our lives, so naturally our perspectives on certain things have changed a little too. Hopefully for the best!

Do you fear losing your Australian fans by making the move?

No, we’ve had a tonne of support from back home since being here, we’re more focused on anyone appreciating what we are trying to do moving forward, whether they’re British, Australian, Chinese, whatever.

So far what has been the surprising positives being here and the negatives you were not expecting either musically or personally?

As we said before we never would have imagined we’d be playing such great shows so quickly, and we really have to thank Tom from Kings Agency for that. As far as negatives are concerned; sausages here are terrible, vegetables are expensive, and it’s hard to earn money to afford to buy any nice food at all.

You are just about to release your excellent debut EP Wastelands, so it must be an exciting but equally busy time for you guys right now?

Absolutely, we’re really looking forward to getting the EP out on this side of the world and seeing how it goes down. We’ve been working really hard to put our lives back together, and now that we’re about to really start playing some great shows it seems like it is about to pay off a little.

 You are releasing it as a free download, what is the thinking behind that?

We just want people to hear it, as many people as possible. If 1 out of every 10 people who download it for free like it and come to a show, it will probably be more than if we were trying to sell an EP to an audience who have never heard of us. We don’t have much money to buy music these days, so bands that release music for free feature pretty heavily on our iPods.

Tell us about the concept/theme that runs through the release.

It is pretty loose based really, and it all comes down to the idea that there can be happiness in everyone’s life if they are able to see it and appreciate it. Obviously some people have problems with that and depression is a serious issue, and that’s not really something that we’re trying to comment on as such. But for the greater part we believe that happiness is a state of mind, and it can be within your control. Wastelands is pretty a story about a guy trying, and failing to come to terms with that.

For a first release it is quite an intensive project what inspired the idea and how much work went into planning how it would work?

We’d spent a really long time writing this, and the idea had developed over a long period of time. Concept records and bands like Defeater and Coheed & Cambria and blown us away, so some sort of concept wasn’t a conscious decision as such, it was just seemed appropriate at the time. We were writing those songs from a pretty frustrated place, and that’s where a lot of the abrasion in the sound comes from, but the idea itself isn’t meant to be a negative or angry thing at all. We also spent a long time producing this record at Def Wolf in Sydney and that gave us a  bit of freedom to develop the sound.

 You have written the songs to the theme or they were already existing  songs which just naturally fitted the idea?

The songs and the theme pretty much grew together. We had a few instrumental tracks written before we really started working out the details of the lyrical content, but we had a pretty solid idea of where we were heading when writing it all.

The release and your music is a varied animal with many distinct flavours, what are the main influences that have inspired you?

Our main influences as a band are groups like Defeater, Comeback Kid, Alexisonfire and mewithoutYOU, but at the time of writing this record we were still interested in big sounds that band like Underoath do really well, and I think that comes across too.

Your bio labels you as a hardcore band but is that not too limiting a tag for your sound?

We don’t really try to get involved with genre tagging much, we’ve written 10 songs for an album later this year and they are very different songs to the ones on Wasteland. We write music that represents our state of mind at the time – and this varies, so Hardcore seems like an appropriately broad tag.

How does the songwriting work within the band?

We spend a lot of time writing music and doing a lot of preliminary demos so that we can go back and adjust things over time. The songs grow with us that way, and we think that it is the most honest way that we can write music, as opposed to trying to pick something in advanced that will unify any songs that we write for any particular release. We all get involved in writing as much as possible.

You have some big gigs coming up I believe?

Yeah, we’re about to head out on tour with Silent Screams & Our People Versus Yours for our first proper UK hit out, we’re so stoked for this. Then we have some other tours in the works, and of course Ghostfest at the beginning of July is something that we still can’t quite believe we’re lucky enough to be a part of.

What is next for Villa Rise?

We’re working on an Album for later this year, so hopefully all goes well and we can get it out and play some rad shows off of it.

Again many thanks for sparing time to talk with us.

Thanks for having us!

Would you like to say something to your new fans in the UK?

Thanks for showing us any support so far! We look forward to getting out there and having a rad time at a gig with you all.

And lastly we have to ask what are you missing most about Australia other than family and friends?

Sausages. Haha. Kyle and Jarrod miss tofu and watermelon, they don’t eat meat.

Read the Wastelands EP review @ http://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2012/04/23/villa-rise-wastelands/

The Ringmaster Review 05/05/2012

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Villa Rise: Wastelands

Classed as a hardcore/punk band in their own bio Australian band Villa Rise are one of an emerging breed that do not neatly fit in any department, this quintet alone veining their creations with a varied and flavoursome array of ideas and sounds. It makes for an intriguing and in some ways an initial undefined direction from many bands though one cannot say that about Villa Rise. As their debut EP Wastelands shows this is a band with clear ideas and thought as well as a craft and ability to achieve them.

Coming from Sydney the band took the decision to relocate to the UK not so long ago to hit the music scene here, making Brighton their base. Whether simply a confidence in their sound, the wish to try new pastures, or a statement about the scene in their homeland it was a brave move for a young band to undertake, though going on the evidence of Wastelands and the high profiled gigs on the horizon, they could and should find big rewards for doing so.

As mentioned they are classed as hardcore but the tracks with the EP reveal veins of metalcore and tech metal to same just two, the songs bursting with aggressive intensity, dark bulging riffs, thoughtfully crafted melodies, and a wonderful discordant touch that always hits the spot. There is also intelligent attention given to their lyrical side, the EP offering the  thought that happiness is a state of mind as it brings the story of ’a young man who descends into madness, because of his inability to accept the positives and in his life.’

From the brief opening track Fracture and its sampled disaster broadcast the release erupts fully with the following Keeper. With a breathless assault from the first note the band thrusts through the ear with towering riffs and incisive melodic guitars from Ben Clink and Brendan Farneli whist the vocals of Jarrod Martin scowl and rage perfectly, his attack dripping anger and venom. The song twists and turns with a seamless flow and success as group vocals, stirring rhythms from drummer Alex Wood, and belligerent riffs from bassist Kyle Usher punctuate the great searching melodic manipulations.

Blindeye and the title track take over next, both impressive and deeply striking tracks though the latter of the two has an easier gait to been drawn to despite being further down the descent to disengaged sanity. Though each track can be taken singly very effectively there is a definite connection and bond that can only be felt and appreciated between the songs when taken as a whole,  a provocative and thought inspiring package.

The EP is completed by Villains and Shadows. Again two songs as equal in quality and enterprise as those before them. In a parallel to the subject they are investigating the songs and EP become more challenging as it nears its end though never losing its firm creative grip and imaginative use of melodies, diverse sounds, and unpredictable invention.

Wastelands is also a grower that starts with an appealing and impressive first introduction but the more time spent in its company the more one finds its depths and creative treasures. Taking influences from the likes of Defeater, Alexisonfire and Comeback Kid, Villa Rise release the EP on April 30th via Monarch Records and as a free download. Already the band is proving a worthy new addition to the metal scene in the UK with Wastelands suggesting there is still much more to come.

Ringmaster 23/04/2012

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This Vicious Cabaret – City Of Ghosts

City Of Ghosts the debut EP from UK post-hardcore band This Vicious Cabaret is a fresh and exuberant burst of rock that pounces upon and feeds the ear with accomplished ease and lingering satisfaction. The four track release is a rewarding energetic introduction to a band that one feels has even more promise and quality within them than shown on what is a thoroughly pleasing first release.

From Watford This Vicious Cabaret has  built up a fine reputation for their highly charged live shows since forming in 2009, their creative blend of aggressive hardcore and catchy melodic rock sounds drawing in an ever increasing following and support from media, radio and fans alike. From the evidence on City Of Ghosts it is no surprise how they are growing in stature and one assumes rapidly as the songs here have no intentions other than to please, thrill and entertain their audience, simply put to give all a good time.

The opening title track tells you all you need to know about the band, energetic with thumping rhythms, stirring riffs and a bassist in Lex Mead to mesmerise with ear grabbing basslines it is instantly enjoyable. Vocalist Jason Thorn’s emotive delivery is impressive giving the song a different vein of strength to power it easily through the ear. Alongside fellow guitarist Joe Davis, the duo spread the song to its limits with crashing punk energy and thoughtful engaging progressive play framed by formidable drums and direction from Radman. An impressive start continued by ‘New Disease’.

Toying with the senses the track is an intense yet playful beast that scoops one up in its forceful grasp to explode in the ear.  The mix of power and carefully crafted impassioned melodies is impressive and inspiring. Many try and leave one thinking it would be better if they had gone one way or the other but This Vicious Cabaret have melded a perfect fluidity that keeps the tracks in full rampant mode whilst exploring their obvious creativity of sound and melodies.

As the EP plays it gets better and better with ‘Entry Points And Exit Wounds’ lifting things even higher. Punk infused the song is immense and the more one listens the better it gets. Another insatiable grumbling bass attack from Mead ensures full attention whilst the blistering guitars eagerly dance all over the ear. As the track progresses it feels as if the pace  is going to veer out of control, the song teasing with suggestions of chaos but the band’s firm hand and skill keeps it perfectly reigned in.

Not to let the sequence go in decline final track ‘The Fall Of Icarus’ finishes things off by unleashing more red-blooded riffs and vigorous rhythms.  The sudden slow down and emotive climax to the song is the only time the EP did not quite work but that is more a personal thing as there is nothing particularly wrong with it, Thorn as throughout delivering great vocals and passion with the lyrics, but it just felt out of kilter with the robust song and usual seamless switches elsewhere in tone and pace.

The band openly list influences as the likes of Funeral for a Friend, Alexisonfire, Finch, and Coheed & Cambria and if you have a liking of those This Vicious Cabaret is definitely a must hear for you. As the final track played it dawned as to another they have a similar flavouring to, Rocket From The Crypt certainly in the energy they produce and the vocal department.

City Of Ghosts to be honest may not be the most ground breaking release but for a debut it is deeply impressive and the more you listen the more it connects. It is a must check out and as the band have it as a free download on their Bandcamp profile there really is no excuse not to, besides any band that lists Reuben under influences has to be special right?

Get ‘City Of Ghosts’ @ http://thisviciouscabaret.bandcamp.com/

http://www.facebook.com/thisviciouscabaret

RingMaster 26/01/2012

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