Gaz Patterson – King Of You

King Of You Artwork

    Gaz Patterson will probably be a name most are unaware of at this moment in time but as debut album King Of You unleashes its enthused stomp and impressively accomplished swagger you have a niggling suspicion that this secrecy will not be a long running status for the British punkster. Creating a boisterous party of melodic and pop punk, the Bedlington, Northumberland hailing musician has made an introduction which captures the imagination. The album is not bursting with originality it has to be said but comes with vitality and a refreshing passion which only accentuates the promise bursting across the eight track storm of enterprise.

As soon as a big bass groan ignites the first seconds of opener Walking Backwards there is a sense of something potent waiting to seduce the ears, a hint soon brought into realisation as riffs flame around the ear and rhythms romp with sinews to the fore through the emerging track. As it hits its stride with the smooth tones of Patterson adding to the persuasion there is a familiarity to the song but one which only adds to the strong lure being laid before the imagination. Comparisons to the likes of Blink 182 and current Green Day have been placed upon Patterson’s sounds and as the track charges contentedly, it is easy to see why especially in regard to the former of the two.

The strong start is matched by the following Last Round, again the throaty voice of the bass standing out from the start whilst the guitar casts a skilled temptation within the pleasing encounter. Slightly more restrained but of the same breed as its predecessor, the track strolls with a purpose and appealing presence if without quite sparking a major fire for its resourceful offering. The same to some extent applies to the next up Broken Hearts On Parade, the track a brief rampant blaze of punk ‘n’ roll with a great fiery solo and combative rhythms.

Going Out My Mind is another pungent tempting of addictive hooks and magnetic melodies ridden by the easy on the ear vocals of Patterson whilst the bass provides its own irresistible vaunt to compliment the enterprise and inflate an already awakened appetite for the release. In many ways the tracks to this point have all come from the same well of textures and invention though with individual faces to their presences, but it is all shaken up pleasurably by the melancholic embrace of Elona. The slow smouldering ballad is an ambient emotive wash of acoustic guitar, softly delivered vocals, and a stringed caressing which is absorbing. With keys adding to its evocative plot, the track debatably is out of place on the album but a thrilling aside to the thrust of the album earning an acclaimed place.

The pinnacle of the album comes with the title track, the song a riff clad, rhythmic tempest of punk rock which from its first chord has mind and heart enlisted in its compelling adventure. An element of The Ramones adds its enthusiasm to the fever whilst an Offspring like bustle encourages the belligerent lyrical content, it all uniting for a thumping ride of a great punk song.

    See You In The End and Pieces Of Two complete the album in fine style, choppy riffs and cantankerous rhythms driving the first of the two directly into the senses, vocals harmonies adding to the punk pop purity whilst the closing track provides a lingering convincing of melodic rock which seals the success of the album and reaffirms the promise of the artist with another varied slice of enterprise.

     King Of You as mentioned is not going to take you down new avenues but instead explores existing ones with an energy and investigation which marks Gaz Patterson out as one to watch closely.

http://gazpatterson.bandcamp.com/album/king-of-you

https://www.facebook.com/GazPattersonMusic

7.5/10

RingMaster 04/12/2013

 

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Hysterix And His T-Rex – Changes – or, when love becomes misery EP

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Looking for a slab of senses stomping intrigue? Then try plunging into the promise drenched tempest of Changes – or, when love becomes misery, the new EP from German rockers Hysterix And His T-Rex. The three track release is an eclectic fury of dirty rock ‘n’ roll with progressive and metal tendencies which captivate and seize the imagination. The Dortmund quartet has already pricked strong interest with previous releases but now stalk a new level of craft and invention which makes the band one needing close attention now and in the future.

Formed in 2010 by brothers Sandro (drums) and Dino (bass) as a side-project, Hysterix And His T-Rex creates a sound which merges a sludge thick breath and stoner heat to metallic sinews and experimental adventure.  Debut single A Clowns Tragedy of the same year was followed in 2011 by Nils (vocals) and Sebi (guitar) joining the line-up. Last year saw the band’s first EP The Wayfare released, a four track piece of compelling if patchy invention, but a strong base from which Changes… has sculpted the band’s finest moment yet.

Changes opens up the encounter, a sonic call soon dismissed by a bulging bassline and prowling riffs framed by magnetic beats. 1463106_648494221839765_1529272345_nAs a groove opens its throat the song has already found a contagious grip which leads into a hardcore bred ferociousness with a viscous sludge antagonism. The track presses on the ears with skill and predatory intent, its body simple but wholly riveting especially as clean vocals replace the previous scowling roar, with both switching from here on in. With an additional grunge lilt and a metal spawned hunger to the rhythms and riffery, the song twists and lurches across the senses with pleasing craft. The song as the release has to fight the raw production a little but it cannot stop the qualities of band and track from making a strong persuasion.

The following Ring takes the sturdy start to another plateau of impressiveness, the track easily the best thing on the potent confrontation. From its first second the track chews the ear and rampages with fiery belligerence, squalling vocals raging over merciless beats and a delicious swarming niggle of a groove. The intensive start is dropped into a vat of doom leaden labour soon after but takes little time in re-emerging into that virulent addictive opening scourge of waspish temptation. A taunting rapacious enticement with vicious aggravation and scintillating uncompromising coaxing, it is an outstanding blaze of instinctive noise abuse and without doubt the pinnacle of the band’s invention so far, and hopefully an area where they will stride forth in direction in the future.

The closing Beyond The Waterfall opens like Wire meets Beehoover, a wall of muscle and intensity seizing command before opening its arms for a grunge/stoner melodic suasion to stretch the offering further. Merging with the harsher elements, the inventiveness continues to press home its advantage as a jazz/avant-garde venture steps into view, it again a moment which is soon evolved as band and song twists and flexes an imagination which only increases the intrigue and its riveting presence. Arguably there is too much going on to flow easily throughout and the cleaner vocals are weaker compared to the inhospitable delivery elsewhere but it does little to diminish the lure and pleasing argumentative conspiracy making a strong persuasion on thoughts and emotions.

Released as a buy now name your price on Bandcamp, the Changes – or, when love becomes misery EP shows the leap Hysterix And His T-Rex has made since the previous release, in songwriting and bold adventure to ignite a definite anticipation and hunger for what they conjure up next.

http://hysterixandhistrex.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/hysterixandhistrex

8/10

RingMaster 04/12/2013

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Night Wolf Presents: The Co Lab Vol.1

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The first in a proposed series of collaborations, Night Wolf Presents: The Co Lab Vol.1 is a magnetic and eclectic adventure for thoughts and imagination provided by a vibrant journey through electronic climes bred with potent essences of hip hop, dubstep, R&B, classical elegance and more.

The project and release is the brainchild of composer/producer/musician Ryan Wilcox aka Night Wolf with the intent of collaborating with a wealth of emerging producers/composers and artists. Hailing from Milton Keynes and Luton based since a child, Wilcox started out drumming in rock bands before concentrating on his own music. Alongside his solo work Wilcox formed Harmony’s Descent with Mike Ziegler aka Centrist from Dekalb Il, the pair’s songwriting and music themed by all aspects of life, from anguish and loss through to happiness and love. Earlier this year saw the release of the Watts The Time and Moonlight EPs, both featuring Centrist, and now the again Fly Productionz Ltd along with Cygnus Music released The Co Lab Vol.1,  brings another varied and captivating encounter from Night Wolf.

The release opens with Move It On featuring German singer songwriter Elsadie Smith and J.A. from Luton trio Soul Rhymaz. Pulsating beats and equally full electronic caresses make the first embrace guided by the dark tones of J.A.; it is a mere moment though as the seductive tones of Smith wash over the ears, her graceful delivery gaining greater potency as the r&b narrative weaves around the senses. It is an elegant and mesmeric temptation with the merging of vocal differences as accomplished and bewitching as the sounds around them. It is a very decent start to the EP if one which pales against some of the following triumphs.

The first of which comes through Work Rate which finds both J.A. and Leo Soul from Soul Rhymaz as well as Liv The Pilot joining the haunting yet tantalising emotive croon. Crystalline melodies dance over the ear from start to finish, a celestial ambience adding to their sparkle but equally there is a sinister breath to the lure, one not far removed from the threatening tempting provided by the soundtrack to Halloween. Plainer vocals make a great compliment whilst the mellower delivery only adds extra warmth to the scenic musical canvas. It is an excellent trigger for the imagination and passions with only one moment where it felt like the cycle of music had come to an end midway and stutters as it returns to the start to roll again to query.

Sucker Free is the pinnacle of the release, its tribal stomping over an energetic hip hop vocal devilry irresistible. Again it is J.A. providing the vocal incentive as the song flexes its electronic muscles and rhythmic tantalising whilst sexy funk naughtiness sways and dances within the hypnotic romp. It is a masterful slice of imaginative bait to catch and spark the passions into a lively and eager hunger.

The following Enemy List is a simmering slow burning success, the smouldering heat and melodic allure of the song taking time to convince but with numerous excursions of its gentle and emotive expanse covered in the impressive tones of Greek singer Gregory Style, emerges as another strong encounter, if still one failing to find the same rich appeal of its predecessor. The guitar strokes provide the biggest highlight of the appealing song but sandwiched between what came before and the following Downgraded it had a tall order to fill, though its attempt is admirable and an easy to return to presence. The closing song which sees Centrsit with Night Wolf is another peak on the EP, a delicious melancholic instrumental lighting the emotions and thoughts, its emotively incendiary washes of strings and classical depths finding a sirenesque enticement.

The song completes a thoroughly enjoyable and emotionally inciting release. It is an unexpected treat to be honest as its style and predominate flavourings are not the usual spices for this musical palate, but one with which you can only see Night Wolf recruiting a wealth of new followers whilst inspiring existing fans to drool greedily.

www.facebook.com/nightwolfuk

www.soundcloud.com/nightwolfuk

8/10

RingMaster 04/12/2013

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Challenges and instinct: an interview with Dave Curran of Pigs

Dave Curran

Amongst plenty of raging creatively incendiary triumphs to have bruised the year, the Gaffe EP from noise rock band Pigs stood out with ease, its trio of tracks a thrilling rapacious bridge between the band’s acclaimed debut album You Ruin Everything and the bands coming follow-up release scheduled for early next year. Consisting of Unsane’s Dave Curran, Jim Paradise from Player’s Club, Freshkills and Hellno, and renowned producer Andrew Schneider (Cave In, Converge, Made Out of Babies, Unsane, Keelhaul), Pigs confront the senses and imagination with a unique and instinctive fury of intensive sonic weight and antagonistic adventure. To find out more about the origins of Pigs, the member’s numerous and constantly commanding projects, Cheap Trick and more, we had the pleasure of talking with guitarist and vocalist Dave from the NYC band.

Hello Dave and welcome to The RingMaster Review, many thanks for taking time to chat with us.

Firstly can we get you to tell us about the beginnings of Pigs, how you all met and the spark to form the band?

Jim Paradise and I had known each other for years from playing in Players Club together.  In 2008 I had demo-ed 20 or so songs playing guitar, and let Jim hear them.  He then suggested we start a new band.  Pigs was born.  We started out as a 2 piece then hired Bob Russell on bass and Eric Cooper on guitar.  Bob could unfortunately not tour because of his work, and Cooper moved to Texas.  Enter Andrew Schneider… Andrew and I met while he was recording a Keelhaul record at his studio.  I asked if he would record the next Unsane record and join Pigs on bass, he said yes and yes!  He’s been with us ever since.

You were heavily involved in other bands at the time of coming together, and of course continue to be, so did Pigs simply come out of filling spare time between projects or was it an idea long in thoughts and the waiting?

I had some down time and wanted to start a new project where I played guitar again.  We all clicked from the onset and decided to keep at it.

Initially the band was a quartet and now of course a trio; how has that leaner set up enhanced the band if at all?

10 million dollars divided by 3 is better than 10 million dollars divided by four?  Not sure if it’s better or not, it’s just the way it wound up.

You have just released the outstanding Gaffe EP, a three track incendiary bruising which for us feels like a natural offshoot of your 599359_727999003883154_249750389_ndebut album You Ruin Everything whilst pointing at an incendiary evolution in process. How does it feel from the inside?

I like the EP.  There was no conscious effort toward any evolution; I suppose that’s just how things go in general.  I like challenging myself, as do the other guys, which hopefully leads to a more interesting end result.

How has your sound moved from the first album, is there any aspect which you feel has found a particularly distinct step forward?

I’d like to think our sound would simply progress every record.  It’s something you have to work at but when it’s fun it should be no sweat.  We always throw around tons of ideas and keep the ones that strike as interesting and, more importantly, don’t sound like anything we’ve done before.

Does Gaffe present a fair representation or promise of what your current writing and sophomore album will hit us

Sure!  Hard to say though…  There will be some surprises…

How do songs come about in Pigs?

It depends, some I write at home and bring ideas to practice for us to work on.  Often we just write together.

Are there situations where ideas maybe thought up for your other projects have found a perfect home with Pigs or in reverse, ideas created as Pigs you felt would work better in your other bands?

Nope.  All Pigs songs were written for Pigs.

How much time is there for Pigs in comparison to your other projects; is there an element of urgency to everything about the band, a need to explode in every aspect just to fit things in or is it a more relaxed situation time wise?

We’re all fairly busy when we’re home, but we always make time for writing and touring.  It’s just a more focused schedule but nothing terribly stressful.

Does the band in some way give you a creative freedom maybe less accessible in your other projects and bands?

We all went into this with no structured plans for Pigs at all.  We basically keep songs that feel right to us.  Then again I’ve never felt musically stifled in any other projects I was in.

pigsAs mentioned earlier Gaffe is three song storm containing two original and one cover. The new songs have, as well as an evolution in sound as talked of, a more defined voraciousness to their creative ‘scourge’ and intensity. Something you feel also?

Well, 2 songs are covers actually.  Cheap Trick and Betty Davis ‘If I’m in Luck’.  But why not!  Voracious and Scourgey as all hell!

You mentioned there the Cheap Trick song, a brilliant cover of Elo Kiddies, a song with for us where Cheap Trick meets Alice Cooper meets KEN mode. What sparked your choice of the song and how did you approach it to make the track something with a unique Pigs feel?

I’ve always wanted to cover that song since I was a teenager.  It wasn’t going to happen with Unsane, so it seemed appropriate. I don’t think there’s a secret formula to feel of it, we just learned it, tuned down and played

You have just completed a European tour with one of our favourite bands, French noise metallers Sofy Major. How did that go?

Terrible, those guys are jerks…  Ha!  Not at all, great band, great guys.  The tour was very fun, can’t wait until the next one.

…Any memorable moments?

All of them.

What comes next for Pigs, can you give any hints or secrets away about the next album?

New record in the late spring – early summer of 2014.   Whistling solos, tell all your friends…

That’s it for me except Melvins tours.  Andrew has a bunch of recording coming up as well as the re-opening of Translator audio soon!

Once again thanks Dave for sharing your time with us. Any final thoughts or words you would like to leave us?

No problem.  I suppose ‘Goodbye Cruel World’ would be a final thought…

Read the review of the Gaffe EP @ http://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/10/16/pigs-gaffe/

www.pigsnyc.com

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 03/12/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Sons of Huns – Banishment Ritual

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Riff clad and groove shoed, Banishment Ritual is one of those albums which is so hard to tear yourself away from once it has its eager and rapacious hooks deeply entrenched within the ears and passions. Sculpted by Oregon trio Sons of Huns, the eleven track release is as virulently contagious and thrillingly magnetic as any stoner/heavy metal confrontation to come along over recent months and though its originality can be argued and debated the album is a ridiculously easy to devour magnetic treat. Since 2009, The Portland band has been firing up and building a keen and potent home fanbase since forming but now with the release via EasyRider Records of the riotous Banishment Ritual, expectations are simply rife with the expectation that the band will soon be recognised and cooed much further afield.

Consisting of guitarist/vocalist Peter Hughes, drummer Ryan Northrop, and bassist/vocalist Shoki Tanabe (who has recently departed the band to be replaced as touring bassist by Aaron Powell of Belt of Vapor), Sons of Huns has already earned a major reputation for their live performances which has seen them grace numerous Portland festivals and stages supporting the likes of Red Fang, Andrew W.K., Danava, and also comedian Brian Posehn. The band’s 2011 self-titled EP drew potent acclaim as did the 7” single Leaving Your Body, but you feel as debut album Banishment Ritual stomps and ravages through the ears like a sonic terrier on heat that everything before was mere foreplay for the real thing.

The title track opens up the storming exercise in persistent dramatic riffery and rhythmic entrapment with an eager swagger and Cover Artfiery breath if not the rabidity and aggressive attention grabbing shown in later tracks. A warm blues squall wraps the guitar enterprise whilst the vocals have a strength and expression which matches the sonic intensity and melodic tantalising veining the track. It is a compelling accomplished start which lays down the appealing canvas for greater things to play upon starting with the following Argenteum Astrum.

The second track is a delicious flame of sci-fi inspired adrenaline coaxed stoner rock ‘n’ roll, a merger of Motorhead and Red Fang with the sinews of Black Tusk rippling throughout its contagious charge. The band is equally unafraid to twist and shift things around within the charge, a slow melodic croon teasing the senses midway in for a mesmeric enticement that tempers and compliments the sturdy riffery and thumping rhythms. It is the first of a few pinnacles closely followed by the mighty seduction of Heliolith, a track where grooves entice places which should never be felt up in public and riffs cage thoughts of escape with resourcefulness and irresistible addictiveness.

The dual assault of Horror In Clay and I’m Your Dad bring the album to another peak, the first with a blues crafted energy and rampancy which flirts with the passions through evolving gaits and inquiring sonic imagination whilst its successor, the best track on the album is pure undiluted bruising rock ‘n’ roll. Part early Queens Of The Stone Age and part Black Sabbath with a spattering of Trucker Diablo, the song emerges as a unique and exhilarating blaze of voracious enterprise to ignite a greater rabidity to the already spawned hunger for the album.

Following the decent but out of place amongst the other tracks instrumental Waking Sleep, Sons of Huns unleashes another incendiary device for the passions with the intensive infection of Planet No. 9, another track where grooves are as epidemically inciting as the riffs and rhythmic confrontation. With strong vocal harmonies to aid the always enjoyable delivery of Hughes and Tanabe, the track storms the barricades with charm and insatiable energy aligned to aggressive endeavour and addiction forging adventure. Seriously challenging for best song on Banishment Ritual it gives a tall order for the rest of the album to live up to.

Both the smouldering lure of Lord of Illusion and the garage rock escapade of instrumental Rollin’ the Dice make a fine if unsuccessful attempt, the pair as many of the tracks breeding a psychedelic air to their stoner and blues emissions, whilst Super Kanpai Rainbow steps up to the plate with an impossibly infectious temptation of garage punk and metal merged into a psychedelic psyche taunting with sonic colour as vibrant and transfixing as the imagination spawning its intriguing and thrilling offering.

Completed by final stoneresque fire of Oroboros, The Sword meets Led Zeppelin to give a whiff of its heat, Banishment Ritual is an outstanding release which makes a stronger persuasion with every encounter.  Maybe not strong on originality but towering in every other aspect, it is an outstanding full length debut placing Sons of Huns towards the frontline of stoner/blues metal.

http://sonsofhuns.com/

8.5/10

RingMaster 03/12/2013

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Lucid Skies – Hounds EP

Credit - Tyler Frith

Credit – Tyler Frith

Though seemingly tagged as metalcore, Canadian fury Lucid Skies has a presence which primarily forges ferocious hardcore with metallic spite and melodic enterprise, the resulting sound which not only grabs attention but gives it an exhausting uncompromising examination which veers from imaginative seduction to unbridled and bruising antagonism. The Hounds EP is the impressive second release from the Edmonton quartet, following the Grudge Match EP of last year, and though it is not faultless it is promise soaked and strikingly invigorating.

Formed in 2009, Lucid Skies took little time in drawing notice their way with a sound inspired by the likes of Hatebreed, Comeback Kid, and Holly Springs Disaster. Started by guitarist Jesse Berger, the band was soon at full complement as Berger enlisted vocalist Nick Ogden, bassist Sam Jackson, and drummer Justin Smith. With impressive live performances seeing the band share stages with bands such as with Fall City Fall, Blind Witness, Fall In Archaea, and Breaking Fourth Wall, the foursome has continually enhanced their reputation, the debut EP sparking additional  keen attention which Hounds can only accelerate as the band continues its emergence.

The self-released Berger produced EP, opens with Shotgun Mouthwash and immediately has ears and senses up for its raucous Lucid Skies - Hoods Album Artworkconfrontation. A guitar grazing behind a vocal sample makes the first move before expelling a sonic breath around inviting crisp rhythms and the snarling vocals of Ogden. Group shouts pounce to back up the frontman to great effect and with riffs grilling the senses and rhythms building their punchy commanding presence the track sears the air with metal bred sinews and punk spite. Musically the song sees the band play with their intent and ideas to make for an appealing if restrained adventure, certainly compared to other tracks on the release, whilst the breakdowns and predacious attack of the riffs only add to the lure of the strong if unspectacular starter.

As soon as Left Hook makes its presence known you sense that something extra is at work, an indefinable essence maybe but one which adds an experimentation and bravery absent from its predecessor. The artillery of drum invention from Smith is an instant contagion whilst the grazing riffery only adds to the developing drama and intrigue. Into its muscular and provocative stride, grooves mark the heavy charge of the song whilst the vocals bring the expected venom with relish and power. The bass of Jackson is a throaty bestial stalking within this mix adding to the impressive incitement, though the breakdown to the back end of the song is clumsy but as the promo used was digital one wonders if it might have been a glitch in the transfer. Nevertheless the closing straight hardcore rage brings a great track to a healthy finale and a certain hungry appetite awoken for the EP.

With Eyes is the best song on the release and the most inventive, its body a continual movement of ideas and bold design. Its opening is straight forward enough, a decent hardcore raging but once it drops into a djent inspired prowling of the senses with the guitar a savage provocateur it ignites, grooves and hooks taking us on a keener escapade. Like in the previous songs things wait until the second half to whip the ground from under the feet and light up the imagination with unexpected skilful quests of exploration. The bass is unleashed to intimidate the ears alone, apart from the corruptive influence of the excellent beats of Smith, it developing a delicious groan to its notes which is matched and accentuated by the guitar to addictive effect, so much so that as the track returns to its initial fiery foraging of the ears it is at first a disappointment, but one soon forgotten as the track unloads the rest of its excellent bruising.

Hounds does not venture into the unknown or the band’s imagination enough for personal tastes, that shown up by the third track and its success when doing so, but also the vocal delivery of Ogden is something needing some enterprise too. His attack is excellent and tones as nasty and corrosive as you would wish but also needing some variation to really shine. It is a genre thing, hardcore and metalcore, to unleash one directional squalls so it is hard to be too critical but it is no accident that the best bands do find a vocal diversity to join a musical variation, something Lucid Skies certainly owns.

Completing the EP is Count Me Out, a track with mountainous rhythms and a spiralling sonic beckoning which is soon badgering the ear with intensive and merciless voracity. A metal seeded antagonist with a tempestuous appetite and combativeness, the song like the opener does not sparks the fires as the other two making up Hounds but undoubtedly continues the marking out of Lucid Skies as a stirring force to keep a close eager eye upon. The potential and existing promise of the band is impossible to ignore and their suspected ascent one which will have a hungry audience in times ahead with the Hounds EP, a name Your Own Price release at the band’s Bandcamp profile, an excellent place to climb on board the ride.

http://lucidskies.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/LUCIDSKIES780

8/10

RingMaster 03/12/2013

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Matt Pryor – Wrist Slitter

MattPryor2013

With a title like Wrist Slitter anticipation was of the darkest emotional and imposing persuasion but as the new album from Matt Pryor unveils its persuasion expectations were soon thrown a curve ball. There is certainly rich shadows and at times keen melancholia to the release but for the main it is an upbeat and vibrant romp of energy, emotive light, and thoroughly enjoyable enterprise. The album took a couple of songs for thoughts and satisfaction to get a hold and find an understanding for the refreshing offering but once connected the release provides a unfussy yet resourcefully crafted imaginative romp.

Renowned as the frontman for The Get Up Kids, Pryor has garnered just as eager acclaim for folk-tinged group The New Amsterdams, his children’s music project Terrible Twos, and indie-rock super group Lasorda which also features Nate Harold (fun.), Mike Standberg (Kevin Devine & The Goddamn Band), and Dustin Kinsey (The New Amsterdams). His own releases have also bred strong responses and respect but Wrist Slitter takes it to another level as Pryor’s finest solo moment. Released via Alcopop! Records in the UK, it is a magnetic feast of creatively flavoured rock pop leaving a healthy smile on the face and in the passions.

The album opens as if set in a jazz driven twenties speakeasy, excited echoes of the past awakening the imagination before Pryor ARR048_Matt_Pryor_Wrist_Slitter_Cover-kleinthrusts his sounds through the door to send them down an expanse of melodic pop rock in the accomplished guise of The House Hears Everything. Guitars and rhythms make an instant appeal to the emotions and without sparking major reactions wins their attention whilst the vocals of their sculptor equally lays down a strong start. As mentioned the song and the following Kinda Go To Pieces do not light a fire inside but certainly spark a decent appetite for their declarations, the second song like its predecessor providing an easy to access catchy stroll with hooks and melodies infectious if not startling in their ingenuity, a healthy enticement.

It is from the title track that Wrist Slitter suddenly turns on a distinctive and irresistible charm. The brief track complete with Cajun twang and invasive drone is a delicious and unexpected twist from which the album only expands and excels starting with the outstanding Words Get In the Way, the best track on the album. From its first breath rhythms make a firm frame for the dark throated bass and guitar swipes to grip and enthral the senses, whilst vocally the mix of Pryor and guest Steve Soboslai of Punchline makes a mouthwatering invitation into the heart and swagger of the song. There is an Everclear essence to the track which only adds to its immense lure whilst its contagious melodic coaxing and potent hooks creates an aural dance which is impossible to resist; only its briefness a slight niggle.

The acoustic folk opening to Before My Tongue Becomes a Sword makes a gentle entrance after a breath into another impressive and energetic prowl of the passions. The two parts do not seem connected, certainly in sound but work well as the subsequent romping blaze of pop punk seduces attention and imagination. With again guest vocals, this time from Chris Conley of Saves The Day and Braid’s Bob Nanna, and Bontempi like keys the song is a lo-key high appealing slice of melodic adventure immediately equalled by the bouncy If I Wear a Disguise. An eighties new wave feel coats the melodies whilst vocally Pryor has an earnest upbeat energy and emotional depth to his delivery to match the enthusiastic sounds around him.

The evocation of As Perfect As We’ll Ever Be is soon slowly burning its mark in thoughts and emotions, its strings a melancholic caress alongside an acoustic guitar kiss and the vocal narrative, before the Squeeze like Foolish Kids, with Pryor finding a definite Glenn Tilbrook lilt to his voice to match the UK band’s melodic prowess, weaves a pleasing embrace over the ears. Say What You’re Gonna Say also has potency and appeal seemingly sparked by the Deptford band, a thrilling hook laded melodic call instantly acquiring the passion’s support with again its short length of a few breaths over one minute again the only irritant.

The slower emotive walk of So Many Questions like the two before carries that Squeeze tone whilst the addictive hope wrapped emotive ramble of There Is No Us recalls the Everclear comparison in a merger with The Super Happy Fun Club. Both bring the listener into a relaxed state ready for the closing energetic saunter of the punkier Won’t Speak To Me which eventually leads the listener into a reprise of the opening scenery. It is an excellent conclusion to a richly pleasing and enthralling release, one which to be honest strongly exceeds what were maybe low expectations, those assumptions soon shoved back to their source with a creative craft and smiling adventure which leaves satisfaction very happy.

Wrist Slitter is available now on CD and 150 ltd edition blue marble vinyl and will be supported by a 9-date headline tour around the UK (with support from Allison Weiss) early next year.

UK TOUR DATES: February 2014:

14 – Southampton, Joiners

15 – Kingston, Fighting Cocks

16 – Nottingham, Bodega

17 – Newcastle, Cluny

18 – Glasgow, Cathouse

20 – Manchester, Sound Control

21 – Bristol, The Exchange

22 – London, The Borderline

23 – Tunbridge Wells, The Forum

http://www.ntwha.com/

https://www.facebook.com/mattpryorsongs

8/10

RingMaster 02/12/2013

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Brain Dead – Menace From The Sickness

BrainDead-Band

Rupturing the air with an exhausting fury of old school bred thrash, Italian metallers Brain Dead uncages second album Menace From The Sickness to escort the senses into a more than decent if arguably expectations filling aggressive escapade. Inspired by eighties Bay Area thrash metal, their name coming in homage to Exodus, band and sound incinerate the ears in a rage of intensively predacious riffing and uncompromising sonic rabidity. Invention and originality is subtle at best but across the eleven track charge it is hard not to be swept up in the passion and adrenaline of the band.

Hailing from Ivrea, a small town near Turin, the quintet formed in 2000 and from the release of their first demo, Rage of Thrash in the September of 2001 were soon making an impression beyond a local fanbase. Two years later second demo Double Face made an even bigger impression soon built upon as the band played the biggest Italian metal festival Gods Of Metal after winning a national competition, the band earning the chance to share a stage with Slayer, Testament, Carcass and many more. Debut album The Deep Of Vortex was unleashed in 2008 with Brain Dead flourishing at an array of festivals such as Hellbrigade Fest, Zone Fest, and Metal Thrashing Mad Fest from then on. The new album released via Punishment 18 Records as its predecessor, sees a line-up of band founding members vocalist Felix Liuni, guitarist Daniele Vitello, and drummer Daniel Giovanetto, alongside guitarist Davide Ricca who joined last year and bassist Alberto Rossetti who stepped into the band earlier this year, sculpting an album with the armoury to take the band to another level of awareness. Menace From The Sickness will not thrust the band to the frontline of thrash metal but should at the very least make their name a recognisable enjoyment.

The Fallout starts things off, the intro a dawning warzone providing an apocalyptic explosion which is becoming a regular BD_Coverbeckoning in metal it seems, before being thrust aside by the outstanding Land Of Cunning. Riffs and rhythms are assaulting the ears from its first seconds whilst a stringent groove twists the senses around its bony fingers. A persistent repetitive lure marks the track deliciously whilst the vocals of Liuni make a compelling varied persuasion with a snarl and twang to his delivery that only draws in further an already emerging appetite to match the strength of the charging sounds around him. There is little which is unsurprising or new to the attack but it matters little as the track niggles and erodes defences with skill and venomous intent. As anthemic as a stripper leading karaoke night, it is a mighty start with only its quite hefty length being a slight complaint, something which does grows to more of annoyance across other song as some feel unnecessarily stretched.

The following Eye Of The Cyclone continues the impressive start, intensive energy and imposing weight accompanying the surge of rhythmic rapaciousness and carnivorous riffing. Brain Dead was inspired originally by bands such as Exodus, Annihilator, Testament, and Slayer, bands you would expect and imagine from the ferocious and skilled storms of the first two tracks and from that maybe unsurprisingly the second song again offers nothing which is ground breaking but instead supplies a predation which is fully contagious. Throughout guitars weave an impressive and incendiary blaze of adventure within the tempest to add variety and resourceful suasion whilst the drums and bass have neck and limbs on a rhythmic string from start to finish leaving them exhausted and content.

A great bass enticement opens up Another Way, its menace and seduction soon wrapped in an equally thrilling thick wash of guitar enterprise and rhythmic caging. From the magnetic opening the song settles into a more restrained yet virulently aggressive infectiousness sculpted with great craft and beefy hunger. Though the song never manages to recreate the strength of its striking start it again it makes a full enslavement of the imagination and passions before handing over to Evil Dead. From this point on the album loses the potency it holds to this moment, tracks though still voracious and skilfully crafted beginning to merge into each other without an intensive focus. There is a slight punk breath to this again over long track which catches some attention whilst the gripping drum attack of Giovanetto marks the next up Razor’s Edge before the more than decent melodic instrumental The Mission makes way for Pay For A Better Life to be able to rummage through the ears with another skilfully crafted predatory fire but with creative flames which avoid scorching the emotions.

Though they do not inspire the same heights of enjoyment as the early songs on the album, which is a disappointment which cannot be ignored, every track upon Menace From The Sickness as shown by the title track, as well as the final raucous pair of Final Truth and Total Despair, are sizeable slabs of vigorous lusty squalls of thrash metal to find satisfaction in. Brain Dead have plenty of promise if seemingly not wanting to carve new depths for the genre and their album definitely makes a pleasing confrontation if without igniting any fire, well after the first trio of impressive songs, but in the end you are thinking there is much more to come which was missed upon this album whilst admittedly still fully enjoying its rampage.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Brain-Dead/45127691823

7/10

RingMaster 02/12/2013

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The Black Ink – Tangerine

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There is a sublime essence to Tangerine the new single from UK rock pop band The Black Keys which continues to seduce long after the song has left the senses, a spellbinding breath that lingers as it engulfs thoughts and emotions. It is a potent weapon for any song to have and within a track as impressively sculpted as this from the London quintet it is a mesmeric enticement matching the equally riveting sounds.

Consisting of the elegant falsetto vocals of Nik Ledgard and the darker tones of Matt Lintott, the band instantly captures the imagination as the two balances and immerses their voices within a sound with more flavours and textures than one of the capital’s Michelin starred restaurants. The recipe is expanded by blues guitarist Mark Thorne (ex-Hares, Babeshadow), bassist Dave Wademan, and drummer Pete Bembridge, the five piece conjuring a presence and caress which leaves a hunger and lustful want for much more, certainly on the evidence of Tangerine.

The single tantalises from its opening note, the guitar teasing as it beckons the listener into an emerging stroll framed by sturdy rhythms and a great dark sexy bassline. The vocals instantly take a hold, both deliveries living up to the build-up on the accompanying promo sheet and then laying down an even greater persuasion as the song wraps its tender yet sinewy arms around ears and imagination. There is a definite Queens of the Stone Age feel to the song but also at certain moments it inspires thoughts of Spirits of the Dead and Beck amongst others within a sound ultimately unique to the band.

Tangerine is an exceptional seducing of the emotions from a band on a definite accelerated rise. With The Black Ink providing two songs for the soundtrack of new British comedy Almost Married which is due for release early 2014 and features Emily Atack (The Inbetweeners) and Philip McGinley (Game of Thrones, Prometheus), as well as the video for Tangerine to be on the credits of the film, this band is swiftly earning vibrant and keen attention from a great many which you suspect will continue for a long time to come.

https://www.facebook.com/TheBlackInk

9/10

RingMaster 02/12/2013

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