Molotov Jukebox – Carnival Flower

Molotov Jukebox pic

It has already been firmly established that if you want your feet and body exhausted but blissfully contented then colourful UK revellers Molotov Jukebox are your puppeteers, their previous pair of EPs already the launch pad for riotous hips and gaping grins. Now the band parade their debut album, Carnival Flower, an eleven track festival of lyrical adventure and lustful melodies framed in a rhythmic escapade which frees inhibitions and ignites the raw dancer inside. It is a release which tempts and smoulders, caresses and incites as it takes the imagination on boldly hued and energetically fuelled romps. Unlike their previous releases there may be no real killer tracks at large, songs which virulently ignite the passions, but instead the release has a perpetual seduction which just as potently brews an enraptured submission.

Molotov Jukebox is a six-piece celebration of passionate aural festivities merging styles such as Latin soul, calypso, gypsy, swing, and dubstep into a unique revelry which has been tagged as gyp-step. Led by the distinctive sultry tones of Natalia Tena (an actress renowned for her roles in Harry Potter and Game of Thrones), and comprising of guitarist Adam Burke, bassist Tom Wilson, drummer Max Burnett-Wain, trumpeter Angus Moncrieff, and violinist/vocalist Sam Apley alongside her, the band has constantly garnered acclaim whilst inspiring an ever growing and feverish fanbase with their vibrant sound and equally vivacious live shows. Both their debut EPs, Double Dare and especially its successor Bang thrust the band into a concentrated spotlight feistily backed by unrelenting festival appearances, certainly in the past eighteen months or so. Now with the release of Carnival Flower there will be no surprise to see the London based band taking country and bodies further afield by the scruff of the neck and leading them to filling streets and dance halls with swerves and sexual dance moves, all to the sound track of Molotov Jukebox.

As soon as rhythms hit to mark the entrance of opener Tread Softly, an itch begins in the toes. The punchy beats of Burnett-Wain hold a Mol juksmile to their swing which is as infectious as the soon to join warn embrace of strings and the vocal persuasion of accordion caressed into life by Tena. It combines with whiffs of sonically crafted guitar and a percussive coaxing into an even tempered but inciting romp brought further to life by the seducing vocals of Tena within sober blazes of trumpet. It is not a riotous start but an eager persuasion which twists and flirts with sound and ideas to waken attention, appetite, and imagination with ease.

From the slightly annoying fade-out of the song, just a personal gripe in a liking for proper finales to songs, temperature and bait is increased thr0ugh Don’t Wanna Know. A vocal croon by Tena courted by excellent group harmonies beside her, kiss the ears initially providing a sexy flirtation which evolves into an agitated stomp with melodic skirts swishing over the senses as pulsating bass riffs use salacious tempting under the climactic flames of trumpet. As its predecessor, the song is not a full-on stampede of aural diablerie but holds an irresistible anthemic lure which enlists body and passions without resistance. The song simmers and at times almost taunts with rhythmic enterprise and string plucking, everything combining to design an evocative and humid template for addiction.

The band’s new single, Neon Lights steps up next, again gentle sexually inviting suasion starting things off before trumpet and vocals soar gloriously across the ceiling of the song. Veining the flight the bass strolls with inviting shadows whilst keys and accordion add their intrigue and mystique to the noir shaded scenery. It is a sumptuous blaze of colour and sound, a track which just grows and grows in the psyche and memory the more it infests the ears. That is true of the album to be fair, first impressions impressed and keen but a new breed of appreciation and ardour emerges given time; previous releases were an instant lust but the album takes a different longer route but with the same result.

The following Can’t Find You is another slow starter on emotions though a swift temptress of ears and thoughts. Almost like a formula for the album, the song also opens up with reserve and a melodic flutter of its lashes before throwing off its hood for a fleet footed waltz of provocative melodies and wanton hues. A mix of pop and swing, it moves around imagination’s dancefloor arm in arm with flailing hooks and elegant harmonies casting a robust yet sensual toxicity over the senses.

The jazz lounge like bred Punchlines weaves and glances across ears with a rich and soulful fondle lighting up thoughts. It is a graceful flame of emotional melodies and sixties harmonies which leaves satisfaction bulging if passions simmering, though they are soon aflame with the brilliant House Fire Smile. The first surprise emerging from the heralding blaze of trumpet and electro additives is that the lead vocals are taken by Apley, an inspired move as his vocals are impressive and make a brave and successful twist to the album. There is a feel of Lazy Habits and Dizraeli and the Small Gods to the song, a whisper of hip hop toying with the heart of the song as a reverse of the norm vocally throws a deliciously unpredictable and magnetic new coal in the fire of the album. The song has a bounce and swagger to its relatively considered stroll though there is always the feeling it wants to explode. Tena’s voice and a niggling guitar toxin only add to the riveting call of the song, an encounter which steals top honours on the album.

Both the frisky Sexfoot and the smouldering Nina keep hunger lively though both are openly pale against certainly the previous triumph. The first of the pair is like a tempered foxtrot with moments where it unleashes its inner devil whilst its successor with the smokey voice of Tena stroking every syllable and the senses in a steamy seduction courted by a classically bred Latin hearted acoustic guitar sends the imagination into a romantic encounter.

From the exotic gala of Tropical Badboy where even the dead could not resist its carnivalesque voracity, the album comes to a close with firstly the dynamic and atmospheric jubilee of No Lady, a track which finds an eighties whisper of bands like Pigbag to its determined sway of melodic curves and rhythmic hips, and lastly a reworking of Trying, a song previously on the Bang EP. The song is a masterful tempting which just has that instinctive lure to inspire full allegiance and union with its potent musical poetry but it has to be said that the new treatment does not quite work as well as the original. Despite that the track is outstanding and the perfect end to a quite impressive and incendiary release for body and heart.

Though Carnival Flower does not quite live up to definitely Bang, it is an open and thrilling doorway into Molotov Jukebox, both a proposition you need to explore at least once in your life, though be warned as one bite is all it takes to be lost to the temptation of the band.

The self-released Carnival Flower is available now!

http://www.molotov-jukebox.co.uk/

8.5/10

RingMaster 28/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Select All Delete Save As – Ultra Cultura

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It is not only a slight shift in band name which is offered by new album Ultra Cultura, but also a richer maturity in songwriting and sound from its creators Select All Delete Save As which at times catches the breath. The band’s previous self-titled debut showed selectalldeletesaveas, as their name was written in 2011, as a highly mischievous and unpredictable proposition. It was a raw and promising encounter which ebbed and flowed in success but nevertheless ignited the imagination of a great many, and a potential soaked seed which has bred the tremendous Ultra Cultura. The new ten track release from the Jersey bred duo of by Antony Walker and Terry Emm is a tantalising and eclectic persuasion which has not lost any of the pair’s devilish intent to wrong foot and constantly surprise the listener. It more impressively though shows a big leap in the quality, writing, and musical craft of the band, showing a maturity which has the potential to bring the band intensive attention.

The pair of Walker and Emm met on a music course at the University of Gloucestershire, and it was when the former was commissioned to record an album, that the two linked up with Selectalldeletesaveas, band and first album the results. With tracks recorded over a year ago, the two musicians have returned to spread their lyrical and musically revelry, Ultra Cultura a natural but to be honest far greater continuation than maybe anticipated. Linking up with sound engineer Jono McMillan, who also provided drums and percussion on most of the tracks, Select All Delete Save As has sculpted an album to steal attention and imagination from its opening seconds, something it never relinquishes until the closing of the final festival of devilment and intrigue. As with its predecessor, certain moments on the release shine stronger than others, but there is never a moment when attention gets seduced away from the release this time around.

The title track sets things off to a strikingly potent start, sparking an immediate increase in an already eager appetite inspired from the band’s last release. Electronic pulses and percussive teasing toys with ears initially, coaxing their focus ready for a raw rub of guitar. Already something feels different to the band, a more honed and concentrated enterprise stroking thoughts as mellow vocals smoulder within the brew. A stronger indie breath seizes control soon after as a shoegaze like warmth permeates the still nicely grazing texture provided by guitars. It is an absorbing persuasion which really ignites with the stunning voice of guest vocalist and fellow islander Rachael McVay. With tones which seduce note by note and a fire to her delivery, the singer ignites the already pleasing track to new levels, which in turn seemingly sparks a greater intensity in the sounds wrapping her contribution. The song is a magnetic start to the album, the first character of a multi-faceted release.

The following Human Error merges chilled electronic premise with guitar woven melodies, vocals plain and emotionless tempering the emotive flames around them. It is a more testing blend than the previous song but also growing to a proposition easily successful with the imagination, its mix of Radiohead and Joy Division coldness with expressive post rock like enticements permeating incessantly until the listener is immerged within its shadowed grin. Its place is sandwiched between the opener and the excellent Modern Life is War and does it no favours but the song easily holds its own before its successor lights another fuse of ardour. Again featuring McVay, the song makes a restrained entrance before a sizzling shot of guitar spirals across the ceiling of the emerging track. There is a feel of House Of love to the track at first which with the alignment of vocals between band and McVay sparking a broader smile of energy, the song glides sultrily across the senses like a mix of The Adult Net and Some Kind Of Wonderful era March Violets. Mesmeric and ravenously seductive, the song is an evocative breeze of indie pop and quite delicious.

Both the melancholic Temperature and the Archetypal Woman simmer in their temptations but croon and dance respectively their way into the affections, the first with the band’s skilled humour and precisely invasive melodic bait within another emotionally haunted atmosphere and the second with its jazzy meanderings and very English relish to refuse predictability and expectations. Whereas Temperature plays with a post punk seeded lack of light its successor romps like The Monochrome Set meets The Jazz Butcher, a distinct British kind of eccentricity which as its companion only expands the diversity and boundaries of the album further.

The pair of Service of the Lord and Nectar of Instruction also takes longer to wrap their persuasive toxins around the passions though imagination is soon enlisted by the temperate yet solemn caress of the first and the anti-folk smile of the latter. The evidence of their success is the lingering enticements which swim around the memory after their leaving, the jazz funk invention of guitar in the second of the two leading into an eagerly catchy chorus one of the persistent lures.

The virulent seduction of instrumental Slowcore Puck absorbs next, its impassioned climate and melody hued colours flirting with thoughts before the post punk/electronic minimalism of The Sun & his Sunglasses brings its entrancing psyche encircling hypnotism to the party. The humour of the band as everywhere simmers and spills with glee, adding to the fun and creative irreverence often at work as in closing song Charge my Pad. An infectious stroll of guitar crafted indie rock with pop spice and drama which seems seeded in The Cure, band and song turn on its audience with a great flume of Bowie inspired mischief, this passage of the song simply the illegitimate yet endearing bastard son of Starman. With blossoming keys and a constantly flavoursome throaty bass line, the song leaves album and its recipient with a gleefully wide grin.

It is probably fair to say that Select All Delete Save As is still an incitement for a certain audience but as we stated in our review of the last album, the band does not care when it comes down to it as long as they light up their own and some other hearts somewhere. Ultra Cultura is sure to recruit a great many more adventurous appetites to the band and its ever evolving presence which has really leap in impressive growth between albums.

The self-released Ultra Cultura is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/ultra-cultura/id868037607

http://www.selectalldeletesaveas.com

8.5/10

RingMaster 27/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Kaunis Kuolematon – Kylmä Kaunis Maailma

Kaunis_Kuolematon

Wringing every dramatic provocative texture and imposing emotion out of their dark creative depths, melodic death metallers Kaunis Kuolematon have unleashed a thoroughly compelling and intimidating debut album in the tempestuous shape of Kylmä Kaunis Maailma. It is a startling release, one bred in menacing atmospheres and thick emotive climates. It consumes and captivates without mercy though it is not always the easiest of journeys for senses and thoughts to explore, landscapes harsh and drenched in intensive causticity which permeates and scores everything from ears to psyche. It is a persistent danger which once undertaken rewards with continually strengthening potency.

The Hamina hailing Finnish band began in 2012 with vocalist/guitarist Mikko Heikkilä (Black Sun Aeon, Routasielu, Sinamore) forming the band to take his songs to the world. The first year saw the release of a self-titled EP to strong responses but it was the single En Ole Mitään last year which raised a definite appetite and anticipation for the band’s first full-length, a hunger which it impressively feeds. Recorded with Saku Moilanen (Red Moon Architect) and mixed and mastered by Saku Moilanen and by Juho Räihä (Before The Dawn, Gloria Morti) respectively, Kylmä Kaunis Maailma takes the listener into the darkest intrusive levels of life, almost welcoming death as a destined friend. It is frightening, intimidating, and impossibly seductive, a narrative to bravely embrace for the surest of pleasures.

Opening track Pimeyden Valtakunta emerges from a portentous sonic mist, its ominous breath a dark hum which is soon veined by a KK- Front_800riveting melodic design of guitar and a vocal sample seemingly seeded in negative events. By its entrance rhythms are rigorously casting heavy imprints, soon to be towering incitements, on the scenery as rapacious vocal roars spill across the air. It is a dramatically evocative experience, imagination running with the descriptive hues and vocal scowling, interpreting sounds and the Finnish language used for their own haunting and imposing visions. It is an immensely dramatic start to the album, a malevolent rapture which finds greater seduction with the clean vocals and melodic graces which colour the formidable soundscape surrounding them.

     Itsestään Kuollut follows with an electro coaxing at first though it is soon suffocated by the ravenous strides of antagonistic rhythms, savage riffery, and bestial vocals squalls. Predacious grooves only accentuate the weight and glorious toxicity of the track as it twists and tightly seduces the psyche, senses abused and caressed with pulsating keys which still hold that electro suasion, and a rampant urgency to the ravaging. It is a masterful slavery of the passions that increases its virulence with even more intensive repetitious grooving and a web of serpentine and varied vocals, the fade-out the only minor annoyance.

Both Kivisydän and Kuolematon seize their own unique grips on attention and thoughts. The first brings a swamp of emotive shadows over pestilential intensity, though it also washes the senses in a beauteous caress of keys and solemn melodies, whilst the second bursts from within a radio search with bulging rhythmic muscles and sinewed bred riffs, both caging the appetite as expressive keys and drifting angelic harmonies add their glancing touches before carnivorous intent brings its voracity to bear over body and imagination. As with the album, both tracks need plenty of time to truly reveal their full persuasions but start with a thoroughly compelling and lingering base, the second of the two an intriguing presence especially with its outstanding sirenesque female vocal calls.

The earlier mentioned first single from the album, En Ole Mitään steps in next, clean vocals wrapping the senses soothingly before coarse tones enter the scene. The music is equally restrained at first before inviting its malicious side to join the affair, the guitars of Heikkilä and Ville Mussalo entrancing and enticing before becoming sonic predators led by the intensive rhythmic examination provided by bassist Jarno Uski and drummer Miika Hostikka. The track expands across its beautiful but rugged terrain with enthralling skill and invention though arguably is less predacious and certainly more merciful than other tracks, such as the next up Sieluni Sirpaleet, though it too is unafraid to allow a delicious weave of keys and the ever impressive and welcome clean vocals within the band to radiate potently from within the stark and aggressive causticity climbing all over the senses.

The album continues to ignite thoughts and emotions as the likes of the spellbinding Pahan Kasvot, a track which manages to seduce an ardour and tear layers from the senses with its raw voraciousness within the less than four bestial minutes of its body, and the enchanting Aamu seize ears and imagination. The second of the two with melancholic strings and emotionally reflective vocals mesmerises across its extensive flight, the stormy passages and vocal tempests only enhancing its elegance stance and emotive beauty. The song is irresistible, setting the listener up for the final exhausting adventure of Haudasta Hautaan, an encounter as abrasing as it is sonically bracing and as rabidly emotive as it is blisteringly seductive.

Kylmä Kaunis Maailma is a striking debut from Kaunis Kuolematon and though it is a touch frustrating in not being able to fully understand each track’s theme because of language restrictions, that small aspect cannot hide the feelings raging within each encounter or stop the album from impressing intensely.

Kylmä Kaunis Maailma is available through Violent Journey Records now!

http://www.kauniskuolematon.com

http://www.facebook.com/KaunisKuolematon

8.5/10

RingMaster 25/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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LIV. – Be The Change

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A release which bruises just as heavily with its passion as its sounds, Be The Change is a direct and formidable swipe of hardcore provocation. The debut album of Los Angeles band LIV., the release thrusts nine unfussy and aggressive punk songs at ears but they are encounters which potently offer twists of invention and angst drenched hooks to further capture the imagination and make the band stand out. Bursting from the South Bay section of their home city, the quartet of Matthew Salamante (vocals), Jason Diaz (bass), Ace Esguerra (guitar), and Tony Esquivel (drums) hit hard and true with their emotive anthems; as the accompanying promo says, ‘LIV. are Hardcore that embodies the love, the passion, the sorrow, the anger, the pain, the struggle, and the promise of life.’

Their songs also come with a rich vein of hope and defiance which fires up the dramatic and infectious narratives lyrically and musically. The 2012 formed band produce encounters which are well seeded in the tradition of the genre, holding familiar traits which keep major surprises at bay, but there is plenty of those earlier mentioned hooks and stimulating twists to seize strong attention and make a keen appetite hungrier. There is a sense of Gorilla Biscuits to the LIV. sound but just as healthily within the album essences of CIV and in less open ways Shelter also push the depths and colour of the band’s confrontation. Opening track Livin’ In Victory is immediate bold and thick evidence of the flavoursome incitement to come, a deliciously earthy dark bass snarl wrapping around ears first before the guitars join rhythms in a fiery evocation of eager energy and rapidly brewing intensity which explodes with the raw abrasive tones of Salamante. The track turns into a swagger at his entrance whilst the guitars cast metal bloomed sonic bait as the song works feistily and successfully on thoughts.

It is a tremendous start backed up forcibly by Make Moves, a more instant pressuring of senses and emotions with vocals and riffs LIV.-Be-The-Change-Covergrazing air whilst bass and drums provoke with rapacious intrusiveness. More straightforward than its predecessor, the song still plays with vocal delivery and sonic expression to provide something easy to get the teeth fully into before ‘Till Next Time fires up its turbo for a caustic blaze of scarring aggression and uncompromising intensity, its mid-way stop and emerging prowl an additional highlight.

Roots strolls in on a rhythmic coaxing next, the raw vocals soon stirring things up before riffs spill their contagious enticement over the scene. The restrained entrance and guitar urgency share time before the song digs out an anthemic vocal call from the band to enliven further the senses. Across its magnetic body, the track continues to flow through a shifting landscape keeping expectations empty and intrigue as well as its emotive flame high.

Both A Standard Issue and Rise provide incendiary climates and appealing tempests to get heavily involved in, the first a more formula yet thrilling blaze whilst the second almost stalks the senses as its vocal and sonic storm grows in pressure and incitement before exploding into a virulent ravaging, rhythms an addictive stomp and riffs a coarse yet inviting turmoil to embrace before joining the group shouts. The following Miles is a similar trap to lean into with greed and energy, its catchy hooks and antagonistic rhythms courted by sonic endeavour and vocal causticity.

The title track arguably provides the widest proof of the invention and still to be explored potential of the band, its masterful slavery of rhythms just the appetiser to a union of carnivorous bass lines, prowling riffs, and vocal abrading. It has a more resourceful enterprise and deliberately menacing breath to its intent than the other tracks, a presence which is predator like sharing an impacting voice in its emotive narrative.

The release closes with The New Liberation, a final compelling brawl to wrap yourself tightly up in, imagination and passions feeding on its old school punk breeding and modern hardcore voracity. It is a thrilling end to an impressive debut from LIV. with Be The Change looking like being the start of a very promising and potent ascent for the band.

Be The Change is available now via OnTheAttack Records.

https://ontheattackrecords.bandcamp.com/album/be-the-change

https://www.facebook.com/livsbhc

8/10

RingMaster 25/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Dirt Box Disco – Bloonz

 Holly Monroe Photography

Holly Monroe Photography

With more individual anthems than the amount likely to be heard at the upcoming Commonwealth Games, UK punk rockers Dirt Box Disco are poised to unleash their new album Bloonz. By now with their third album you could be tempted to think that the Burton-on-Trent quintet might have matured and grown up into a big boys sound but thankfully the band has refused to be swayed by the sensible side, the result another immense and irrepressible riot of prime cut punk ‘n’ roll. Do not make the mistake of thinking the band has not pushed their sound and craft though, it is just their devilry and imagination which has refused to mature as confirmed by the voice of the track King Of The Castle on Bloonz. The album is their most richly flavoured and spicily inventive mischievous incitement yet, the kind of stomp infamy licks its lips over.

Formed in 2009, Dirt Box Disco has been unrelentingly climbing the ranks of punk rock since making their first startling mark with riotous live performances and the Are You Ready? EP of 2011. One of the most turbulently energetic and mercilessly fun bands on stage, their reputation and stock has risen insatiably especially over the past couple of years, aided no end by the release of their debut album Legends and its successor Peoplemadeofpaper. Both releases were deservedly soaked in acclaim and generated waves of new appetites and attention upon the band, a track from the second of the two finding itself the soundtrack to a recent big cosmetic advert. It is hard to imagine Bloonz not only emulating their success but firmly slapping the band onto the top table of European punk and rock ‘n’ roll.

As soon as the first breath of Standing In A Queue hits the ears you know you are in for another thrilling and exhausting ride with the Printband sound, the track frisking from the outset with the devilishly coaxing vocals of WEAB.I.AM as the urgent riffs of DANNY FINGERS and SPUNK VOLCANO lay down an irresistible instant tease. With the crisp beats of MAFF FAZZO aligned to throaty lures provided by bassist DEADBEATZ CHRIS and the whole band backing up on anthemic vocals, it is Dirt Box Disco back doing rock as only they can. That is only part of the tale though as sound wise the first signs of a flavoursome expanse is apparent, the song fusing in a virulent strain of pop punk with more than a whisper of early Green Day if given a make-over by the equally early years of The Damned to it. The track is an outstanding stomp which grips feet and nether regions in a salacious charge of energy and contagion.

The following We Are The Rejects lets rawer sinews have their moment whilst an infectious toxin permeates every note and syllable. The guitars open with a scuzz lit antagonism, slowly scowling before raising their rabidity and energy whilst creating a caustic lure with raw metallic spicery. Surging guitar squalls and adversarial rhythms drive the song forcibly across the senses and feverishly into the imagination, the expected full addictiveness of the chorus and its lighter croon unable to stop the track from being the heaviest imposing treat on the album and probably from the band ever.

Rewind And Eject takes its lead from its predecessor, again finding a more violent voice to its breath and scrub of opening guitar, an intimidation stood over by the ever rebel rousing tones of WEAB.I.AM. From its sterner start the song opens up with flowing melodies and inescapable vocal hooks, though the guitars still stalk with an acidic dispute to their sound and essence. Though not as dramatically gripping as the first two songs, it grows into another inescapable suasion before being pushed aside by the muscularly striding Bullshit. Gripped by caustic grooves which sear the senses within a cage of muscle bound rhythms and cantankerous riffs, the track forges another diverse presence, one which steps out as an accusing predator with lingering hooks and anthemic griping draping every twist of its fierce body. Providing further proof of the evolving invention of the band across the album, that intimidation is then strapped by an ingenious sonic binding, rich grooves winding tightly around the passions for Skids like tempting lining the ’77 bred core of the song.

We are only four songs in and already have experienced a quartet of individually sounding triumphs, the fifth soon stealing the show as King Of The Castle explodes in the ears. Lurching into a rumble of agitated rhythms, corralling vocals, and predatory basslines, band and song stomp and taunt with impossibly contagious exploitation of the already submissive passions. That Green Day spice is again at play but similarly you can suggest essences of Bad Religion and Turbonegro in varying degrees to the unrelenting addiction brewing rampage. With guitars blazing with craft and incendiary relish, rhythms rousing up pulse rates, and vocals charming up the defiance and immaturity in us all, the track is another glorious pinnacle of Bloonz.

Both 9 Lives and Welcome To Hell settle into easily accessible and eagerly inspiring slices of attention stealing rock ‘n’ roll. Neither set the fires burning in the belly as certainly the previous track, but both show that when Dirt Box Disco are simply roaming comfortably within their own creative walls they are still looking down on the invention and presence of most other modern punk bands. The two songs leave lips licked and greed happy, the second especially notable with its foraging of garage punk corners for a blues kissed sonic fire of appetising rioting, before the excellent pair of I Swapped My Brain and Supreme And Gobshite decide to take their hefty portion of the plaudits. The first of this two is fuelled by a mix of The Ramones and Radio Stars, an incorrigible brew obstructing any resistance of its head on riot whilst its successor latches onto a Buzzcocks bred synapse scything groove, riding it hard for a boisterous and combative bruising employing thumping rhythms and sedately savaging riffs. The most aggressive anthem on the release, the track burns and riles as it seduces, riling passions to stand up and roar their approval. It is another twist in the mouthwatering variety of the album, again a song where despite all the comparisons offered, it and all tracks are pure Dirt Box Disco.

   She Goes Out captivates the senses next with uncomplicated riffs and searing flames of melodic and vocal enterprise, all courted by sonic invention. As eager in its unbridled anthemic call as in the creative heat of its solo the song is a siren, its potent bait soon repeated in another guise by Golden Frame. Less forceful in its still merciless enticement, the song simmers and worms relentlessly under the skin. The grouchy growl of bass is the first potent trap swiftly followed by feisty riffs and tightly binding solos, all guided by the excellent legion of harmonious vocals. It all combines for aural slavery of the senses feeding an admittedly already biased appetite for the band until it breeds a new level of hunger.

The album is closed by one final brawl of sound and intent with the thrilling We’re Going Out Tonight. Punk n’ roll at its most commanding, hungry, and epidemically infectious, the track is a blistering finale and sums up the good bad things about the band. To be honest we were expecting good things from Bloonz simply on the evidence of the previous Dirt Box Disco albums but it leaves those thoughts seeming very reserved in their hopes. It is an album which just gets better and motivates greater bad habits the more you spend in its diablerie; the choice protagonist for all rockers everywhere.

Bloonz is released via STP Records on April 26th and available @ http://www.stprecords.co.uk & dirtboxdisco.bigcartel.com

http://www.dirtboxdisco.co.uk

10/10

RingMaster 23/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Horse Party – Cover Your Eyes

Horse Party by Kate Wood

Horse Party by Kate Wood

Their previous singles teased and seduced but now UK indie band Horse Party go straight for the heart with their debut album Cover Your Eyes. Its eight varied and shapely tracks provide a raw and flavoursome adventure which simply captures the imagination with no respite whilst simultaneously asserting the Bury St Edmunds trio as one of the brightest emergences in recent times.

The birth of the band goes back to a drunken night in a church where drummer/vocalist Shannon Hope and guitarist/vocalist Seymour Quigley badgered guitarist/ vocalist Ellie Langley through ‘abusive messages’ to join up with them. Fuelled by a mutual passion for the likes of Bjork, Fugazi, Cat Power and terrible films, Horse Party came in existence and soon pulled in strong acclaim with debut track Clarion Call, a free release which took the band to the attention of BBC Suffolk Introducing whilst sparking numerous support slot offers including one with Dingus Khan. A second single and a live EP called Scarlet & Blue followed to increase the weight of their emergence whilst last year saw the trio playing over fifty shows which including sharing stages with bands such as Tunng, Pinkunoizu, Shonen Knife, Heartless Bastards, Ghostpoet, The Nightingales, and Vuvuvultures, perform a live broadcast via BBC Introducing from the new John Peel Centre for Creative Arts, and release their third single through new label Integrity. It was certainly a fruitful and busy year for the band, one set to continue in this with already the album release and a tour currently being undertaken proving a striking success.

The album opens with Back To Mono, a track which instantly jabs at the ears with fuzz lined guitar strokes with a more than  Horse-Party-CD-case-web-versionBeatle-esque tempting to their dramatic coaxing. The jagged tease is soon aligned to an equally compelling melodic exploration and feisty rhythms whilst Ellie’s vocals cast a stirring lure over the lot. It is not an explosive track but one which is unrelenting in its repetitive incitement and insatiable in its want to charge up the imagination. The firm almost imposing beats continue to drive on the track, never relinquishing their potent bait even in the more open and blustery chorus. The song is merciless with its enticements, band vocals a glorious web to lay their narrative and the sonic designs veining the song irresistible colour, but it is that blinkered core of the song which steals the biggest rapture.

Clarion Call makes a less striking entrance but with its minimalistic guitar bait equally draws a keen tempting which flourishes further with the addition of the distinct vocal of Ellie and against lively beats. Before they bring their rich hues there is a feel of Young Marble Giants to the song which then develops into a broader deeper catch of sixties garage rock and chilled indie persuasion. The further it extends its body the stronger and fuller the track evolves, guitars again painting evocative textures which the vocals and chilled harmonies wrap themselves around. Already the album has attention and appetite seduced which Scarlet & Blue reinforces with its smouldering caress and sultry air. Though it is a simmering melody crafted temptation there is fire in the belly of the temptress, incendiary raw clashes of percussion and riff providing imposing crescendos within the graceful and mesmeric immersion of the senses. Live the track is masterful but now having heard in from a studio breeding, it shouts with the emotive beauty and innovative invention of Horse Party.

The following Inbetween with a skittish percussive invitation brings a Fleetwood Mac elegance and flight to its equally vivacious energy. It is a tremendous mix, soaring melodies and mellow vocals tempering but egging on a racy energy and brisk rhythmic provocation. It is another infectious and inciting pleasure easily matched and surpassed by What Do You Need. From a great first impression when released at the tail of last year, the single has grown in weight and potency over time for us and sitting within the album seems in its element as it boldly opens with drama and intensive seducing which outrivals even the first track. A restrained strum is punctuated with deliciously heavily weighted drum thumps, their dynamic pokes spearing the maze of melodic intrigue spiralling across the canvas of the song. Their forceful intent is tempered once the vocals unveil their expression within the weave of the song, though within that restraint they wait to pounce again, which they do with a slow but certain relish as the song stretches and explores its boiling textures and imaginative corners. The busy chorus brings thoughts of Alanis Morissette but only to flavour another original and frisky encounter from the band.

The next up Six returns to a sweltering climate, its thick heat and evocative atmosphere enveloping ears and thoughts with emotive tenderness whilst guitars and bass carve absorbing shadows. Passion flows as animatedly as the sonic sculpting which fires up the jazzy expulsions of the song whilst that sixties feel permeates yet again with a garage rock blaze to the sweltering air lying invitingly over the enthralling creative landscape.

     Let The Man Die catches expectations by surprise not only, as the songs, with its immensely tasty sounds and invention but also by Quigley taking the lead, his tones a potent variation to the album. The song is pure rock pop, the most accessible track for newcomers proving that the strings to their creative bow are as wide as they are diverse. The track is unafraid to add a little post punk beauty especially in its climax either, just to tease and reassure that intrigue is never too far away from the heart of the songwriting.

Closing with the acoustic To Know You Less, a very decent gentle caress to end the show, Cover Your Eyes is pure aural majesty. Singles alone have suggested that Horse Party is a very special proposition but together with their new companions they declare the band as one of the UK’s most exciting and original prospects. Remember it is still early days for the band too so horizons look very rosy for them and us.

Cover Your Eyes is available digitally now via Integrity Records with a gatefold CD version with 16-page booklet released on Monday 12th May 2014.

http://www.horsepartyparty.co.uk

9/10

RingMaster 23/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Slain – Before The Inferno

 

slain pic

There is no re-writing the text book of death metal with Before The Inferno, the album certainly re-working but treading down existing violations, but it has to be admitted that the debut album from Polish band Slain is a thoroughly enjoyable and potently contagious provocation. Consisting of eight monstrously aggressive and openly accomplished violations, the release grips from its opening track through to its intrusive last. There is admittedly a certain mix of success within the release but never a moment where band and album leaves satisfaction wanting and pleasure lacking.

The creators of this impacting release were formed in 2005, though the band’s seeds in many ways harken back to the nineties when band founder and guitarist Paul was in Cryptic Stench. Some of Slain’s songs originated from that time with the band reworking and rearranging them to fill the full blooded onslaught of their ferocity. Initially Slain went through a few personnel changes whilst the band continued to earn a strong reputation and fan base with their live performances. A stable line-up emerged though before the album was recorded; Paul joined by second guitarist George, bassist Lucas, drummer Wojtass, and vocalist Marcin. Recorded in 2012, Before The Inferno found its release with The End Of Time Records at the tail of 2013. Since its release, Slain has seen the departure of George and Marcin, the pair being replaced by Hannibal and Balrog respectively. The turn of the year the band has begun working on new songs for their second full-length whilst this, their debut continues to make an impression and mark the radar of a persistently widening attention.

The Bełchatów quintet comes at the ears through a sinister ambience, demonic shadows, and intrusive breath conspiring to infest senses Slain-BeforeTheInfernoand imagination. The niggling start to Confession of the Blind Messiah erupts into a torrent of predatory riffs and punching rhythms whilst vocally vitriol and ravenous intent clad every word. It is a magnetic entrance, the track enslaving with its concentrated confrontation before unleashing a further increase of aggression and malevolence. Speared by skilled sonic flames and a persistently shifting antagonistic stance, the riveting track makes for a mighty start to the album, essences of Behemoth and Decapitated offering their presence.

The following Wings of War strides murderously into view next, clad in a tsunami of destructive rhythms, flailing riffs, and an underlying groove which is two-toned in voice and lethal in effect. Well into its purpose, the grooves mutate into an infectious lacing of the senses whilst the vocals similarly squirm maliciously between textures, the combination rigidly enslaving an already rampant appetite for the release. It is a ferocious onslaught but ripe with contagion and addictive toxins, especially the impressive sonic blaze of guitar which colours the track with its piercing solo. As suggested at the start there is not a great slap of true originality to the encounter but thrills and neck muscle manipulation show no restraint in their persuasions.

There is a thrash sculpted fire to the sound and album, its rabid hunger again insatiably driving the force of Malleus Maleficarum and War Is Coming. The first is a feisty stalking of the senses with an angry spine of bad tempered rhythms within an acidic veining of skilfully crafted sonic incitement. Its successor takes the rapaciousness of the other track to greater immensity, its carnivorous rabidity spurring on prowling rhythms and a pestilence of riffery. The track is voracious savagery but again infuses a swagger and swing to its barbarity which infests the passions. When a song straddles the imagination and treats it to a rodeo of feverish energy and vivacity it is hard to resist even when the wounds left bleed profusely.

Fucking Gods continues the violent and irrepressible suasion of the release, its brutal rampage unrelenting yet pronounced in its precise baiting whilst the following Deadly Midget presents a more restrained attrition but one no less hungry in its predation and manipulative toxicity; grooves and riffs sharing the imposing canvas for their fevered taming and consumption of the senses. There is a touch of Sepultura to the poise and intensive intensity of the track whilst its ravenous incessancy and melodic adventure slips easily under the skin and into the memory.

The album is completed by the raging turmoil of Thorn and the imposing enterprise of Omen, both tracks a tasty horde of vindictive rhythms and scourging riffs spiced by sonic invention, though neither quite match the heights of the earlier songs. Nevertheless the pair brings a great album to a stirring close to leave satisfaction full and emotions eager for more. Before The Inferno may not carve out new inventive avenues for death metal but when it provides a hellacious ruin as exciting and stimulating as it does it is hard to raise a care. Slain has ensured that anticipation for their sophomore album is already gearing up.

Before The Inferno is available via The End of Time Records now!

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Slain/1395976333996090

8.5/10

RingMaster 22/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com