Herod -They Were None

Herod 10

An encounter and experience which permeates senses and imagination with a ravenous and intense emotional hunger, They Were None is a dramatic and merciless introduction to Swiss post hardcore band Herod. Their debut is a leviathan of weight and intrusive endeavour, a dark and stark tempest of voracious atmospheres and inescapable intensity examining every pore, thought, and emotion. It is at times a testing and exacting encounter but one which is as rigorously compelling as it is intrusively predacious.

Herod was initially the solo project of guitarist/bassist Pierre Carroz which came to life in 2006. Holed up in Malmø in an isolated studio apartment, he began creating and merging dark and depressing riffs with his baritone guitar, recording them on an old 4-track recorder. Taking inspiration from the cold and desolate Swedish climate he returned back to Switzerland where in 2011 he met former Twisted drummer Fabien Vodoz and A Fine Day to Exit vocalist David Glassey. Uniting to form Herod, the trio worked the already bred ideas of Carroz into new songs, tracks which would come to make up their impressive debut They Were None. Recorded in 2012 with producer Julien Fehlmann (The Ocean, Coilguns, Unfold) and mastered by Svante Försback (Volbeat, Rammstein), the album has emerged as a devastating proposition soaked in destructive beauty and venomous enterprise. It is an uncompromising and often punishing incitement brewing a consumption of sludge, hardcore and progressive metal which instantly thrusts Herd, with a line-up completed by guitarist Bertrand Pot, into an immense spotlight.

The album opens with The Fall and within seconds is smothering the senses in a thick cloud of sonic suggestion and heavily weighted Herod Artwork 1breath. Its intimidating expansion begins as a distant squall but is soon immersing ears and beyond in a rapacious caress. The guitars cast a portentous and immediately menacing toxicity, crisp rhythms and sinewed throaty riffs spearing and veining its malevolent air to further engage and twist the psyche as the track’s exhaustive narrative unfurls lyrically and emotionally. It is a murderous encounter but irresistibly captivating especially with the brief escape of clean vocals and its entwining melodically bred sonic web; thoughts of Converge meets Cult Of Luna whispering in thoughts as the song invades further.

It is an attention capturing appetite igniting ten minutes immediately matched and pushed further by Glory North and then Inner Peace. The first roars at and contests with ears from start to finish whilst employing further unpredictable and enthralling twists of vocal diversity, a restrained passage of emotive design, and predatory imagination. Essences of Meshuggah add to the carnivorous qualities of the throaty guitar and even darker bass as the track persistently breeds fearsome yet seductive bait to its persuasion. The second of the two is even more dangerous, its more controlled gait adding menace to the intensive manhandling of thoughts and emotions by the of song’s voracity and that of its individual elements. It is a suffocating proposition but as the previous songs is swamped in rewarding violations and ingenuity.

A melodic entrance with a hypnotic percussive accompaniment instantly makes the following Northern Lights a virulently appetising proposition, the bestial gnawing in the background sparking encroaching shadows around the elegant seduction flirting with ears and imagination. The beauty of the scenery continues to call even when the track unleashes its barbarous wash of domineering rhythms and corrosive riffing; the track a brutal yet warm temptation exposing further the outstanding songwriting and composing of the band. In the hands of others the song could be just an overpowering slab of hostility but Herod sculpts it to be certainly uncontrollably demanding but also the enabler for the imagination to explore its canvas and textures.

From the sinister and immersive instrumental Sad Hill Part I, the pair of Albert Fish and We Are the Failure expose the weaknesses of emotions, exploring and pushing the limits of their and the listeners fears. The first is a ruinous concentration of coarse vocals and riff spawned rabidity which initially has assumptions expecting a primal storm throughout but the veining of sonic tempting and angst clad expression to the vocals ensures another engrossing premise, if one lacking the adventure and lures of previous songs. Its successor though is another matter, the track a melancholic proposal which from its sombre opening melodies soars into the passions with the heavy lipped dark tones of Glassey, his clean vocals merely hinted at on other songs, given full rein to immediately impress. He is not the strongest singer in that style but with such passion and expression to every squeezed syllable he is magnetic. The track itself is a helter skelter of angst bedded voracity and enslaving metallic design, every note and thought a glorious trap.

Through the bordering on savage aural protestations of Betraying Satan, captious rhythms and guitars spiteful intrigue to the tempestuous vocals and sonically laced grooves, and the rigorously erosive Watch ‘em Die, the album continues to exhaust and impress whilst the excellent No Forgiveness For Vultures moves from a heavily soaking persuasion into a mouthwatering maze of unpredictable riffs, persistently twisting invention, and biting yet composed rhythms. With the dramatic final instrumental Sad Hill Part II concluding the release, They Were None proves itself to be not only a masterful debut but an immensely exciting one. Herod has announced its arrival in a strenuously impressive way, one which is still increasing its potency with every brave immersion into its depths.

They Were None is available now @ http://herod.bandcamp.com/album/they-were-none

www.herodnoise.ch

8.5/10

RingMaster 02/05/2014

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Erotic Market – Blahblahrians

©narcissenoyé

©narcissenoyé

With a name like Erotic Market you automatically expect and definitely hope to get something spicy from their album Blahblahrians and we can joyfully say that you do. The album is a fruity adventure of sound and imagination, quite simply a refreshing kaleidoscope of electronic mischief, vocal intrigue, and sonic ingenuity. There are times where the band finds more success with their riveting conjurations then in other moments but from start to finish the album is an excitingly unpredictable and invigorating exploration to capture the passions.

Erotic Market is the French duo of Marine Pellegrini and Lucas Garnier, the two forming the band in 2012. The pair has been making music for over a decade playing in contemporary jazz bands and has already worked on a project together called N’Relax, which across three years released two studio albums and undertook numerous tours. Describing Erotic Market’s sound is difficult at the best of times but undoubtedly flavours such as hip hop, psyche and noise rock, quirky electronic pop, and at times garage rock colour the cryptic canvas the band casts over the senses. Blahblahrians is as seductive as it is disorientating, as instinctively magnetic as it is bewildering, and ultimately an irresistible experiment to embrace and devour with greed.

The album immediately flirts with the imagination through opener Retro retardo, a mix of Morningwood and The Ting Tings meets em coverThe Knife. Resonating beats hit the senses first, awakening attention for the sharp appealing vocals of Pellegrini amidst percussive and sonic spatterings. It is an instant temptation sparking a hungry appetite in the emotions, a greed fed and inflamed by the expanding smog of electronic toxicity and exotic hues of electro teasing offered. There is a punk essence to the vocals and a j-rock whisper to the sounds at times which only increases the flavoursome presence of the animatingly mesmeric encounter.

The following I want to be some booty continues the potent emergence of the album, its smouldering and subtly sultry climate the surface for a minimalistic breeze of empowering seduction. Like its predecessor the song weaves and sways around the listener even if it is with restraint to its energy though it counters by sharing an irresistible potency to match the first.

Two songs in and diversity is an open roar and hopes that its continues are soon satisfied by Bitchy muses and Blah blah, the first fusing a pleasingly shallow breeze of hip hop bred vocals with climactic keys and tribal rhythms, both aspects skirting rather than imposing on ears and the delivery of Pellegrini. Again it is an appealing uncluttered premise precisely spotted with aural colours which voices launch their suasion over, a delicious siren of sound bringing danger through the increasingly heavier involvement of primal beats. Its successor is an enchanting slice of electro pop, though as already expected it comes through ever twisting manipulations of sounds and ideation. The track ebbs and flows with its melodic breast; breathing captivation and fascination with every rise and swell of its contagious narrative. There are times where you feel the legacy of bands like The Slits and Rip, Rig and Panic in the song and album to be honest, all adding refreshing spice to the ingenious recipe.

Pellegrini croons and smothers the ears in vocal elegance and glory to bring Blue blue into view next and such her charm and quality it would be easy and very satisfying to listen to her swarming over the senses alone for the remainder of the track. Instead evocative and heated keys bring their dramatic caresses and incisive inventive flames to enlarge and intensify her declaration. It is a gloriously smooching fire with Pellegrini quite scintillating and is replaced by the just as tantalising if wholly different psyche spawned DDDDrunk. It opens with smokey vocals and an ascending spotting of sonics which can only be described as Devo-esque. That alone steals a rabid rapture and when added to a barren but compelling and rigorously intriguing landscape of imagination and enterprise, the proposal is as bamboozling as it is invigorating, especially with its fiery scuzz infused climax.

She –ass provides twenty seconds of tempting sound but leaves before it can make any real impression and imprint on thoughts, and truthfully is soon forgotten when Snakes writhes and winds its engrossing techno lent electro maelstrom of adventure around the body. It is a sensational psychotic dance of prowling beats, electronic innovation, and carnal seduction; an exhilarating brew which simply increases its power and toxins across its vivaciously thrilling body, the vocals similarly catching fire towards a rigorously fertile finale. Easily the best track on the album, which shows how immense it is with the pack of triumphs around; it alone reveals the might and potential of the duo. In many ways the album struggles from here on to compete with its highest pinnacle though the vigorously resourceful Are U cool? and the bewitching It’s a breaking both entrance ears and imagination whilst Clitacasm brings one minute of racy and sensual tempting which is brief but sonically amorous.

The slow groove infested Societoy provides a last temptress for heart and mind, its predatory gait clad in a stirring and innovative design of melodic and rhythmic incitement honed into a warm embrace of electro adventure. The song feels like the real end to the album though it is followed by Weird arabic stuff which we have to be honest we could not get or find any peace with and a remix of It’s a breaking by Everyday. It is decent enough but from a promising start evolves into the expected direction and sound so many re-mixes bring to songs no matter the original’s uniqueness. Nevertheless neither can defuse the brilliance of Blahblahrians. Erotic Market is band which was unknown to us before this release but now is a permanent feature of thoughts and acclaim, something we suspect will be emulated torrentially as the album envelops the world.

Blahblahrians is available via Jarring Effects now!

https://www.facebook.com/EroticMarket

9.5/10

RingMaster 02/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Welington Irish Black Warrior – Vafancuneo

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Welcome to this year’s most rigorously exciting and insatiably compelling release, Vafancuneo. Ok it is probably too early to truly give the title to Welington Irish Black Warrior, the creators of the extraordinary release but there are no doubts it will be in the top handful of nominees come judgement time. Brewing a unique sound most closely described as post punk meets psyche rock with a veining of noise and experimental industry, the Swiss band has sculpted a new template for emerging noise driven bands. Their EP is sensational, a riveting and breath-taking, almost tribal incendiary device for imagination and passions to explode over, and certainly one of the essential releases of 2014.

Consisting of vocalist/guitarist Brynjar Thorsson, bassist Léon Jodry, and drummer Steven Doutaz, the Neuchâtel based trio came together in 2005, three music loving men who supposedly came together as a band to stop working in a watch making factory. Since that entrance Welington Irish Black Warrior has been on an upward spiral, notably releasing a self-titled debut album in 2012, collaborating with Kunz on the five track KUNZWIBW of last year, and spending a whole year writing music based on Alejandro Jodorowsky’s movie Holy Mountain, which they performed live in a church in front of the screen during a projection of the 2 hours movie. With a flood of shows, European tours, and festival appearances only increasing their stock, time is ripe for the band to draw the strongest spotlight, something Vafancuneo is potent bait for.

Recorded live by Alberto Dutto (Movie Star Junkies), mixed by Mano Moccia, and mastered by Louis Jucker (Coilguns, Kunz, The Fawn), 02_Front CoverVafancuneo is a virulent infestation of senses and mind from the opening minute of first track Hand on Stomach. The beginning to the song is a scattering of noises and splattering of rhythms but a mix brewing and merging into a united probing as it all comes into potent focus. A resonating throat calls out from the bass as the rhythms of Doutaz roam with a rampant appetite, both prowling and seducing the senses as distorted flames of guitar wind their riveting toxicity around thoughts. It is a thrilling provocation even before the joining expressive almost psychotic vocals tones of Thorsson complete the scintillating package, every aspect of the song a stark yet endearing poison writhing under the skin and into the passions.

The post punk conspiracy of the track is just as intensive in the following Jahzz, reinforcing thoughts of Wire and early Gang of Four hinted at for varying reasons in its predecessor. Jodry’s bass lies down the first delicious lure, its hypnotic suasion a predacious instigator to striding rhythms and sonic scythes of guitar. To those previously mentioned references you can also add Kabul Golf Club and unavoidably Joy Division as the track courts imagination and ears with its unpredictable and unrelenting web of sound and invention. There is also a sinister air to its aural narrative, a noir kissed ambience which colours the intriguing canvas and persistent single minded gait of song and hook.

It is already an irresistible encounter by this point but the album opens an even richer vat of temptation and tempting with Lac Orbu. The initial clutch of short grooves is once again an instant capture of a raging appetite for the EP before the track stirs up an agitated blanket of rhythms with stabbing guitar as the bass groans hungrily by their side. Vocals bring their distinct enticement to the psychotic dance next; a canter pungent with a contagion of repetition and rhythmic disorientation. Thoughts of The Fire Engines add to the suggestive spicery of the romp before everything is smothering in a sonic squall. Lines are blurred and air infused with raw ambience as the song moves towards its departure, the band again leaving assumptions as pointless as warm melodies trying to encroach into the creeping soundscape.

A pulsating distortion of sonic psyching draws the next up Fascination into view, its strobing soon matched by whipping rhythms and the anthemic vocals. The bass brings a stable shadow to the light show, its premeditated drawl holding the scattered bait for one massive and intrusive seducing. The jagged breath of the track scars the senses beautifully, seizing their allegiance automatically as the acidic flight of guitar winds enticingly almost wantonly around the imagination and emotions. A strong whisper of The Gaa Gaas also permeates the scaring of sonics and rhythms but as throughout thoughts of Wire come the closest to describing a little of the brilliant brew the band conjures.

A schizophrenic character grins from within Bankal 10/15; a fruity discordant twang casting its spell over the guitars as the bass again adds the more even gaited poise to the cacophonous exploits littering ears with scarring beauty. The breaking swagger and addictive swerve of guitar and song simply ignite another wave of lustful ardour in mind and heart, inspiring the return of feelings and bewildered yet hungry thoughts arguably not felt since the late seventies when many of the comparisons mentioned reigned. There is a definite nostalgic feel to the release but only as rich hue to something unique and of the corrosive now.

Vafancuneo closes with the just as tremendous Samba Suicide, a hive of waspish sonics making the first play for the passions before an infectious grinding of riffs and sharp hooks pounce with a pop intent. Probably the most accessible song on the EP, certainly the most danceable, the track evolves into a disorderly, unsynchronised adrenaline fuelled waltz, an atonal stomp which exhausts and exhilarates with equal success. It is a dynamic and masterful finale to a quite brilliant encounter. Welington Irish Black Warrior takes noise and discord and weaves them into the most insatiably gripping and antagonistically seducing pleasure possible. Their songs are genius and wickedly captivating, and once they worm under the surface impossible to shake off.

Vafancuneo is available now @ http://hummusrecords.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/welingtonirishblackwarrior

10/10

RingMaster 01/05/2014

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Twinesuns – The Leaving

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Mesmeric and disturbing, like the sinister soundtrack to an invasive inescapable dream, The Leaving is an encounter to equally fear and embrace. Consisting of five extensive examinations of the psyche, the debut album from Twinesuns explores the darkest haunting textures and depths through a fusion of drone and doom within just as imposing stark and ravenous ambiences. Surreally cinematic and corrosively evocative, the release is an experiment in thought provoking sound and cryptic emotion, a hallucinogenic nightmare devouring senses and imagination.

Twinesuns is the result of a union between C (NVRVD) and Thor Ohe (ex- Kinsai, DNAmplified), the pair coming together to play heavy music with no restrictions and that reflects their creative passion. The band says in the accompanying promo to the album, ‘The idea behind THE LEAVING, or more essentially in the foundation of Twinesuns, was to create music that basically allows it to be everything that both of us – as a band like. We wanted to break free from all these rules that dominate today’s heavy music. Why is there a need of rhythm or drums? Why can ́t there be mistakes on a record (since it’s a very natural habit to make mistakes)? Does heavy music need vocals? Why do there have to be different parts and always the same structures in music? Why can ́t we play the same riff for 10 minutes? We wanted to ignore all these guide lines and create something for us, something that would primarily fit our taste and understanding of music and art.’ The album also sees the addition of Abraham’s Renzo Tornado Especial providing moog designs within the caustic and distortion washed sonic incitement of the band. Mixed by NVRVD ́s bass player and C. ́s brother Stefan Braunschmidt, and mastered by Chris Johnson, The Leaving is the rawest, starkest, and most viscerally honest proposition likely to be heard this year.

Recorded live in an eight hour session, the album opens with Epithome. Its emergence is enchanting as it slowly unveils itself from Twinesuns_Coverwithin a background of sonic whispers. A melancholic guitar caress tenderly strokes senses and thoughts initially, its repetitive sigh as magnetic as the twisting shadows creaking and unfurling their own bait behind it. The textures within the song continue to darken as they evolve sinister noir soaked and increasingly vocal temptations. The rapacious scenery of the track eventually consumes the beauty, sonic torches and distorted courting swamping ears and emotions as danger leers at their submission in every turn of sound and an electronic smothering. The track provides a suffocating and intensive realm for thoughts to interpret and explore though in many ways it is just the taster for the tempestuous torment of To Die, When It ́s Right To Die.

The second track reveals its doom sculpted muscle from the opening seconds, its throaty predation and sonic toxicity invading every synapse and thought. Within a breath the track has the listener in the belly of a cavernous leviathan of sound, its scenery drenched in a primal tenacity aligned to a carnivorous drone. It is a monstrous provocation, an unrelenting erosion of emotions but infectiously hypnotic as it lures in further examinations of ideation and emotions by the mind.

Neither Subsonic Prophets nor Like My Father Before Me, I Choose Eternal Sleep show any respite in the invasive potency of the album, the first casting an exhausting rabidity to its insatiable sonic scarring and ravenous low ended hunger whilst its successor explores the eye of the storm, investigating the creative jowl of the beast to bring another diverse and intriguing expanse to the release. With both though, as with all tracks, the pair of musicians add nuances and understated but open movements to the dragging journey of tracks to flirt and continually inspire re-evaluations of the narrative within the imagination’s canvas emotions.

     Die Drei Gesichter Der Furcht brings The Leaving to a close, its premise and haunting presence arguably the most compelling and distressing of all the tracks. Its ‘peaceful’ entrance is similar to that of the first song, and also like that eventually immerses the elegant if intimidating intrigue of sound with a predatory and intensive menace. It continues to stalk right through to its conclusion, never leaping at the distressed emotions and thoughts, just offering a repetition of emotive intimidation and sonic venom. It is a glorious end to an outstanding album.

Certainly The Leaving takes its pound of flesh as you stand within its at times almost too demanding consumption, but the rewards for mind and soul are constant and increasingly stimulating over each subsequent encounter. Twinesuns is a project breeding fearsome and fearful adventures, long may they continue.

The Leaving is available now from Hummus Records @ http://hummusrecords.bandcamp.com

http://www.facebook.com/Twinesuns

8/10

RingMaster 01/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Pray For Locust – In the Shadow of the Colossus

Photo by Hilda Arneback

Photo by Hilda Arneback

Like a venomously disgruntled nest of vindictive hornets, In the Shadow of the Colossus the new album from Swedish metallers Pray For Locust swarms over senses and imagination with hordes of vitriolic grooves, ravenous sonics, and most of all an inventive viciousness which is predatory in its more restrained moments alone. The second full-length from the Stockholm quintet is simply magnificent, a gripping maliciousness which stands amongst many in fusing metal and hardcore but alone in sound and enterprise.

Formed in 2009, Pray for locust has earned a more than decent reputation and loyal following with their live performances and debut album Swarm of 2010. It is safe to say though that the successor to the album and well-received Into the Ocean EP of two years ago is the band’s finest moment and the realisation of their place to the fore of raw, creatively antagonistic metal. Self-produced and mastered by Ronnie Björnström (Aeon, Live Elephant, Hate Ammo), the Discouraged Records released ravager is an exceptional beast with the potential to inspire.

The album seizes total attention right away as opener Bat Country wraps a sonic squall around ears before the band erupts into an PrayForLocust-InTheShadowOfTheColossusintensive persuasion of savage riffery and similarly destructive rhythms. It swipes the cobwebs away from thoughts and emotions immediately, the heavyweight metallic voracity of the track a potent co-conspirator with its hardcore roar. Vocalist Tintin Andersen drives the encounter to a new causticity upon the entrance of his uncompromising lyrical brawls and passion drenched tones, adding to the consuming immensity of the fury caging the listener. It is a masterful concoction, brief sonic hooks and longer lingering grooves superbly littering the muscular rage sculpted magnetically by guitarists Jerry Engström and Stefan Schyberg whilst the inventive rhythmic assault of Simon Corner cages and bewitches with another soaking of cruelty.

The towering start is just a warm up though as This Blackened Sky digs deeper and thrusts further into the passions with its contagious brilliance. Swirling sonic laces entangle the imagination initially, rhythms and vocals courting the intrigue with vengeful rapaciousness before the track settles into a darker and restrained parading of its animosity and imposing narrative. It is not long though before the urgency returns with uncompromising intent but it is happy to share time and space with the ‘gentler’ intrusiveness whilst also inviting a raw and infection driven swagger to help launch the chorus. The variation of vocals is also as incendiary and welcome as the revolving invention in sound and gait, it all ensuring every second, each twist of the track is irresistibly toxic.

Both Dead Mans Curse and Reap What You Sow provide rich fuel to the fire for the release ignited in the passions, the first cored by a understated but potent throaty bass suasion from Kvasi, a prowling agonist with a death metal scented malignancy. The bass provides a great snarl and depth to this, and to all songs to be fair but often elsewhere it is immersed in the mix too much for personal tastes but certainly here makes an open impact. The second of the pair of songs seems to take inspiration from the loftily soaring hostile flames and emotive enticements of its predecessor and spills a resourcefully dramatic provocation to its implacable body and invigorating body. Grooves writhe and seduce throughout the tempest, encouraging and tempering the anger of sound and vocals simultaneously in another excitingly shifting savaging. It is not as concerned with atmosphere and melodies as the previous songs but employs the same unpredictable and extensive ingenuity within its ferocity.

Talking of ferocious, the word hardly does justice to the wrath of Ten Thousand Dead, its heart bred from the purest punk hatred and structured with a multi-flavoured metal furore and endeavour which bands like Meshuggah, Lamb Of God, and Cancer Bats would devour. The following Our Last Breath continues in similar vein after emerging from provocative shadows clad in waiting predation. That fierce rabidity needs little waiting time though to charge as sinews and intensity overpowers the senses. Its rampage is additionally coloured by addictive sonic spirals and a rhythmic buffeting which splinters with resonating malice upon collision with ears. Twisting and flirting at times with blistering imagination, the bruising storm re-confirms the strength of the album and startling craft of the band.

 God of the Underworld flies for the throat with metalcore tendencies aligned to melodic poison next, vocals again an impressively varied enticement enriching the hues of the unrelentingly ingenious battle, whilst the following Statement spits and rages with merciless intensity, hardcore and metal merging for a raucous malevolence which enslaves thoughts and emotions brutally and completely. Though neither song quite lives up to earlier tracks, it is the excellence of songs before which is the difference and not any lack of invention and potent lures within the pair.

The album concludes with the ravenous and exhaustive virulence of Bad Blood and lastly Heroin Eyes, the first a glorious imaginative corrosion which rips the throat from emotions. The final song is a thrilling barbarous pillaging not quite matching the last song but bringing In the Shadow of the Colossus to a tremendous if not as memorable finale. Overall the album is a scorching agitator, one scintillating in sound and craft whilst providing an encounter which leaves psyche and senses basking in an enterprise rarely heard in the majority of hardcore bred releases. There is no need to watch out for Pray For Locust as after the album hits the world it will be impossible to avoid their storming presence we suspect.

In the Shadow of the Colossus is available via Discouraged Records now!

http://www.prayforlocust.com/

9/10

RingMaster 30/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Cokegoat – Vessel

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If an easy journey with scenic gentleness is the purpose of your musical intent then steering well away from Vessel, the debut album from Chicago sextet Cokegoat is advice to be heeded. The eight track release is a tsunami of imposing yet empowering sounds and invention; a tempest of stoner, sludge, and progressive metal which merges into a dramatically brawling and rigorously rewarding incitement. Riffs spew animosity and rhythms provoke with an even greater antagonism whilst vocals roar with eclectic venom across the consumption. It is a brutal and seductive onslaught, but one with equally ferocious veins of creativity and imagination which ensures every track ignites far more than just ears. The album is demanding from start to finish, often a punishing encounter, but mostly a tremendous debut roaring aloud the might and potential of these new provocateurs.

Consisting of Jeff Wojtysiak (vocals/guitar), Ed Nudd (guitarist/vocals), Rebekah Brown (keys/vocals), Chase Bentley (guitar), Tim Baldwin (bass), and Jordan Schultz (drums), Cokegoat has built a formidable reputation with their live performances alone which has seen the band sharing stages with the likes of Church of Misery, The Skull, Early Graves, Electric Hawk, Order of the Owl, Jucifer, Indian, Mount Salem and many more. Vessel though is set to ignite the widest and probably wildest attention with eagerly accompanying acclaim you can only expect such its intensive proposition. Recorded with Andy Nelson of Weekend Nachos and mastered by Carl Saff (Unsane, Red Fang, Earthless), the impressive album may not end up heading best of lists come December but it is a release which is intensely impacting and unforgettable.

As mentioned earlier the album is primarily bred in a mesh of sludge and stoner metal but the eclectic textures and sound of the release CGvesselcover1600_1600are just as potent and instantly on show as opener Fear the Followers rages against the ears. Launching a sonic rabidity matched by vocal squalls and punching rhythms, the track is a furious brew seeded in punk and hardcore. It takes the senses and expectations immediately by surprise and once wrong footing their assumptions, unfurls infectious grooves and a melodic acidity seducing appetite and imagination. Twisting and swerving with almost vitriolic endeavour, the song evolves into a riveting landscape of warm climes and intimidating shadows as a doom kissed weight lies eagerly upon the forceful roars and senses entwining sonic hues. It is a compelling introduction explored to greater heights by the following pair of songs.

Buried in the City entangles the listener in a web of sonic design and predatory rhythms straight away, the guitars winding tight evocative sirens of sound round thoughts whilst coarse vocal abrasing works on emotions, their graze tempered superbly by the underlying clean vocals which coax just as potently. The ambience of the song is erosive from the start but brews and accelerates its intense malevolence and rapaciousness to trap and enslave before the outstanding destructive crescendo of a finale gets involved.

The following Dogs is a predatory treat, its dark throaty bass opening a wonderful distorted lure which seduces the senses ready for the annihilatory prowl and disorientating psychedelic manipulating brought by guitars and keys respectively. It is an alluring entrance which only increases in contagion as the track settles into a sinew driven stroll with a captivating mix of clean male and female vocals encased in carnivorous riffing and caustic hooks. It is a bewitching suasion, one which never loses its strength of bait even when a fiery energy and urgency washes through the heart of the song, vocals returning to grizzled scowls and riffs to their contentious enticement. A truly mesmeric encounter which is evolving its presence and narrative right to the closing seconds, the track takes top honours on the album though it’s persistently challenged by tracks like the two parts of End of Your Life. Part 1 is a venomous almost bestial challenge but a provocation which makes for riveting submission, its primal riffery and rhythmic angst perfectly aligned to mystical keys and subsequently roving, virtually rampaging melodic invention. Its slow to grip start is a raging infection by its climax, something Part 2, tries to replicate, it also beginning with a fully immersive and restrained opening. To be fair restraint to Cokegoat is still a raw abrasion which strips senses mercilessly and scores emotions permanently. The track does not match its partner in persuasion or the earlier tracks, but easily continues the invigorating ravaging provided by Vessel.

Fly by Night, Pt. 2 is pure aural pestilence, its opening second the cue for a corrosive swamp of guitar and bass to beleaguer the senses whilst rhythms lash the body with cyclonic intensity, a metallic punk voracity again coursing through sound and band. That hunger and animosity is held tight as sonic adventure with progressive insight spills across the distressed canvas of the song. It results in another thoroughly engrossing and intensive examination, one contrasted pleasingly by Fly by Daylight. Whereas the hostile climate of the previous track devoured, the mellower seducing of melodies and warm enterprise here soothes the wounds, though a mix of charming and abrasing vocals continue to stand and at times scream face to face as keys bring a celestial spattering to the strenuous soundscape.

The track swallows the imagination with ease, a success matched by the closing Glorious Dead. The song is spellbinding, a sirenesque envelopment aligning to another barbarous though more respectful intensity which unveils and expands a weave of sonic adventure and melody kissed enterprise. It is a towering end to the album, alone unleashing all the might and riches of the band in songwriting, passion, and experimentation.

Vessel is not without minor issues, primarily the lack of variety to the predominate abrasing vocals, though that is more to do with personal taste, and at times a lack of toxins to make some songs a lingering venom away from the release. They are small nags though and cannot stop album and Cokegoat providing an impressive and exciting debut.

Vessel is now available digitally from http://cokegoat.bandcamp.com/ and on red vinyl from The Path Less Traveled Records

http://www.facebook.com/cokegoat

8.5/10

RingMaster 30/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Trioxin Cherry – Let’s Take Off And Nuke The Site From Space

TC Photo by Holly Monroe

The excellent Hell To Pay EP in 2012 more than suggested that its creators had the potential to make a big mark on the UK punk scene but Trioxin Cherry go far beyond making a mere potent impression with their debut album, unleashing one of the real treats of the year so far. Let’s Take Off And Nuke The Site From Space is a virulent contagion of rock ‘n’ roll, a brew of garage and horror punk which sculpts its own identity whilst insatiably working on senses and passions. Carrying hooks like a gunslinger and grooves like a nocturnal temptress, the release is punk at its riotous inventive best.

The Nottingham bred trio as mentioned made their first sizeable impression with their Hell To Pay EP, a raw and magnetic five track release which stirred up eager attention and support for the line-up of guitarist/vocalist Rebecca Campbell, bassist/vocalist Pete Grady, and Ryan Murphy on drums. Their two song contribution to the Chainsaw Ballads split with Thirteen Shots and Razing Hell only cemented their promise and an eager appetite for their presence and sound. The releases certainly hinted at the possibility of big things ahead from the band but may be not to the extent offered by Let’s Take Off And Nuke The Site From Space or certainly as soon as its release. Since the recording of the album Murphy has departed the band to be replaced by Nathan Hart but he has left being part of a massive breakthrough and step for Trioxin Cherry.

The raw energy and intent of the previous releases has been retained in the new album but honed into a concentrated and clear proposition TC cover which simply ignites ears through to passions from first track to last. After a Japanese spoken intro, opener Baka Manko thrills and catches the imagination by surprise. Also sung in the oriental language, the song bursts into view like a robust caped crusader, muscles flexing and energy brewing for a riot. Riffs stride purposefully and rhythms stomp with crisp sinews but not for the last time it is the bass adding the danger to the character of the song. It has a grizzled throat to its prowl, a gnarly air which is infectiously toxic alongside the similarly virulent riffs and soon to charge vocal declarations. As to what the song is about who knows, but it matters not as the romp is irresistible and an open call to feet and imagination to climb on board with the awaiting rampage.

The brilliant Fly, Bill Murray! steps up next, riding on a rigid spine of grooves from bass and guitar punctured by again firm rhythms. It is a composed yet hungry stroll of rock with nostrils flaring in its intensity and inventive chorus. The song sees the band just as keen to twists vocals and harmonies as they are their sound, but never taking its foot off of its anthemic potency as it roars and badgers as a fiery climax comes into view before making way for the equally voracious Psycho Killer. Campbell takes little time to unleash a masterful howl as the new track establishes a predacious stalking of the senses, guitars climbing over ears with hungry riffs as the bass again bringing a bestial growl to the scenery. Caged by a similarly intimidating stroke from the drums, the song crowds and pressures the senses until submission is inevitable, wiry hooks and that grizzled bass temptation only adding to the addictive lure with Campbell’s vocals the icing on the bloody cake.

It is a massive start to the album which only builds and seduces the further you go, Good Day To Die the next triumph in line to steal the passions. Campbell brings her Fay Fife like tones out for the song, backed by some great vocal shadows from the band. The track is a real predator, lurching and glaring with withering riffs beside antagonistic rhythms, but it is the glorious twisted surf rock toxicity of the emerging groove which is the most venomous and scintillating temptation and helps send the track to the top of the pile.

Both the melodically sinister Wrong Turn and Let’s Take Off continue the slavery of thoughts and emotions, the first a blaze of discord kissed sonics and pacey beats lorded over by the ever fine tones of Campbell and plays like the result of a demonic act between The Rezillos and The Duel. The second of the pair launches from another deliciously primal bass sound, guitars soon replicating its lure in their own colours. The song swings and saunters belligerently as it gives the kiss of death to the world below, adding its rapacious stomp to the dust.

A reworked version of the acclaimed title track from the band’s EP comes next, Hell To Pay crafted into an even stronger and irresistible enticement than before. Cored by a sultry groove which worms under the skin within seconds, the bass again providing its own addictive dark poison, the song manages to brew richer hues and darker corners to it’s just as epidemically contagious incitement, a success matched by another revisit to a track from the previous release, Hit Me. This track again develops new toxins and depths to its original premise but also an even greater aggression to its defiant spite and avenging intrigue. With another groove which simply winds so tight around the passions that lust bleeds from pores, the track is quite magnificent and with the previously mentioned song makes the atmosphere tough for the song splitting the two to contend with. Not that the old school punk bred Ratbiter notices as it rampages with relish, riffs and rhythms abrasing with contentious brawls and badgering as ridiculously catchy hooks and another bass exploit provide something more to drool over. It is the storming chorus though that clinches the deal, its venom and enterprise sensational.

You Belong To Me is the most adventurous song on the release but also pleasing ‘messy’. Like a fog of intense sonic squalls and thickly clouded aural animosity, the song is the soundtrack to hell, a caustic hymn to the outbreak of ravenous cemeteries and waiting devastation. It’s a noisy maelstrom which works a treat and shows more of the adventure of the band and further hints of how strong the band is yet going to become.

The album is completed by the excellent Rebellion, a storming ode to the renowned UK festival. Starting with an acoustic caress of Campbell and guitar, the track explodes into one last stomp of punk rock. It is the perfect anthem to close the release, like a mix of Holly and the Italians and Flogging Molly. Do remember to hang on after its conclusion too, as a great acoustic version of the same track is hiding in the silence.

Let’s Take Off And Nuke The Site From Space is a massive festival of punk rock, multi-flavoured and diversely sculpted and proving that punk is always an essential proposition and Trioxin Cherry one of its new masters.

Let’s Take Off And Nuke The Site From Space is now available on STP Records (www.stprecords.co.uk) and @ http://trioxincherry.bandcamp.com/album/lets-take-off-and-nuke-the-site-from-space

https://www.facebook.com/trioxincherry

10/10

RingMaster 29/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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