Versus You – Moving On

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Since forming in 2005, Luxembourg’s Versus You has become one of Europe’s most captivating and hard- working pop punk bands, as well as the source of much anticipation when news of a new release comes to light. The release of new album Moving On has been no different in raising a keen appetite and equally does not detour from the band’s knack at providing a thoroughly enjoyable romp of punk rock at its most accessible and infectious. The album does not set a new trail for the genre or band come to that, instead it simply parades twelve songs which just do what Versus You does best, capture the imagination with virulent hooks and melodies whilst thrilling thoughts and emotions with superbly crafted and lyrically insightful songs.

With a decade of stirring up audiences and fans on the impending horizon, Versus You has kept the energy and passion of their presence and intent alone impressively high over the years. Renowned for their hunger to tour and take their sound to fans, the band has been a regular attack of gigs and tours across their homeland, as well as East and Western Europe, sharing stages with the likes of NOFX, Alkaline Trio, Rise Against, White Flag, The Casualties, Bayside, Jimmy Eat World and many more. Equally their previous trio of albums as well as EPs and an outstanding split release with White Flag, has thrilled and helped thrust the band to the fore of Europe’s punk scene, even with a spate of line-up changes especially in the sticks swinging department. Fourth full-length Moving on is another commanding and deeply satisfying proposition, as said not one to change the face of pop punk but easily reinforcing Versus You as one of the leading lights.

Produced by Chips Kiesbye, the album opens with the immediately rigorously coaxing When It All Goes Down, its initial scrub of guitar an intriguing irritant to awaken attention and appetite alike. The song is soon into a feisty stroll Versus You Moving On Packshot 960x960with the rhythms of drummer Jerry Kirpach punctuating the mesh of caustic riffs conjured by Eric Rosenfeld and Dario Bruno. It is not an unrelenting attack though, the song respectful in its aggression and open in its web of easily snagging hooks with the bass of Giordano Bruno adding its own throaty lure to add extra bait to the first easily addictive blaze of sound from the album. Lyrically the song is one of many looking at band life, whilst other Rosenfeld penned themes include traveling, making friends, relationships, and life’s issues, songs never afraid to deal with unexpected things directly.

The following If The Camels Die, We Die makes the strong start look like a mere appetiser, its eager energy and urgent enticement of catchy melodies and deeply hooking snares impressively catchy. The bass finds an extra snarl to its tone which hits the spot perfectly whilst the slightly grizzled vocals of Rosenfeld only add to the raw and honest edge of the encounter. The guitar designs also standout with their imagination within the narrow but full flight of the track, a success emulated and more by the next up A Way With Words. The song is a real pop song, its compelling power pop radiance irresistible to feet and voice. Essences of its sound remind of Good Charlotte and Smashmouth, these spices teasing thoughts pleasingly whilst around them riffs and rhythms cast a more sinew tempting to the potent revelry.

Both On The Town and Be Better Than Me gets the fire in the belly raging, the first a terrific stomp of grazing riffs cut across by flames of acidic melodies as the excellent vocals explore relationships. Its successor is a mellower enticement but no less riveting in its punchy beats and rock ‘n’ roll bred suasion which brings a touch of Pinhead Gunpowder as well as irresistible unpredictable twists and excellent additional female vocals to its glory. The pair push the rising stature of the album up another step, the first especially a highlight of the album with its dramatic air and ridiculously contagious incitement musically and lyrically. Their success is matched easily by Skinny And Distracted, roguish rhythms and stabbing hooks uniting for a Boxcar Racer like treat. At ease persistently changing its urgency and sinew built gait, the track is another anthemic coaxing impossible to resist joining in with but just as strongly brings new thought provoking adventure and imagination to its body.

One That Can See is a resourceful and adventurous romp for ears and emotions, though not finding the same heights as previous songs even with its appealing sonic endeavour, whilst Stay Down, Stay Strong also lacks that same passions igniting spark though it provides a fiery rock song which is as infectiously binding as it is evocatively coloured by a melodic rock intensity. Both tracks leave appetite and reactions well fed nevertheless before Kitchen-sink Drama leaves them bloated and blissful from its insatiably contagious and bruising stomp. There is an antagonistic and defiant edge to the song which emulates from the vocals and lyrics to inspire a strong drama and depth to its presence, whilst hooks and melodies complete the enslavement with masterful and instinctive invention.

30 Pills unveils another big highlight within the album, the provocative song themed around somebody being HIV positive. Hard hitting lyrically and musically, Rosenfeld alone bringing a deeper growl to his narrative, the track roars and incites yet still employs some of the juiciest hooks and melodically drenched chords to persistently inflame ears and emotions. It is a glorious strike leaving the final pair of Still I Persist and You Are My Friend a hard task to follow. They make valiant attempts though, the first a vigorously solid slab of muscle driven punk rock with passion fuelled intensity and the closing song a slower slice of punk balladry which with Green Day like melodic potency, brings a smouldering and evocative finale to greedily embrace. It is a fine end to a great album.

Moving On is arguably a release which delivers what you expect from Versus You without the band making great strides forward but with songs that simply fill every need and want of a pop punk enticement, and with plenty of extra thrills included, it is a release which simply leaves pleasure and contentment the overriding result and that is more than good enough to unreservedly recommend the album.

Moving On is available now on Bomber Music @ http://bombermusic.limitedrun.com/products/528789-versus-you-moving-on-cd-and-vinyl-lp-and-dl in download, CD, black vinyl, and Ltd Ed vinyl versions.

https://www.facebook.com/vsyou

8.5/10

RingMaster 21/07/2014

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Near Death Condition – Evolving Towards Extinction

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Sure to give extreme metal a big nudge to their existence and intimidating quality, Swiss death metallers Near Death Condition have unleashed their third full-length Evolving Towards Extinction, a towering and brutal assault on the senses. Thrusting eleven tracks of uncompromising and ravenous ferocity through the ears, the release also holds a rich vein of inventive imagination beneath the tsunami of vicious endeavour and intent. At times it is understated or needs extra attention to really explore, but it constantly makes each track an individual incitement of increasing rewards, all combining for an impressive stature to the album. It has to be said that the release does not consistently light a rigorous blaze in personal passions or excite as intensely in places as others, but there is no denying that attention and appetite are thrillingly fed.

Hailing from Valais, Near Death Condition emerged in 2001 with inspirations from bands such as Morbid Angel, Deicide, Deathspell Omega, Death, and Gorguts driving their immediately imposing sound. Since forming the band has lit up stages alongside the likes of Origin, Hour Of Penance, Darkane, Texture and numerous others whilst releasing a pair of full-lengths. Demo release Delusional Perception of Reality was uncaged in 2005 to good underground attention. Its success went towards the band eventually signing with Unique Leader Records with The Disembodied – In Spiritual Spheres released in 2011 to potent acclaim and responses from fans and press across the globe. March of this year saw Evolving Towards Extinction uncaged to again strong reactions and with its threatening gait, testing hostility, and creative tempest it is easy to see why.

The quartet of vocalists/guitarists Patrick and Stéphane, bassist Simon, and drummer Guido give a brief twinge of sinister drama before going straight for the throat with some of the most rabid riffs and destructive rhythms sure to be heard this year. The entrance of Words of Wisdom literally bowls the senses over, savaging their very being with increasing toxic sonic violation and rhythmic barbarism as riffs gnaw their surface and heavy guttural vocal expulsions roar malevolently. It is a hellacious introduction, one which never relents in its intensity even as the guitars begin unwinding equally venomous grooves and an underling swagger. Subsequently melodic acidity and shifting gaits join the tempest to engage the imagination as impressive guitar enterprise burns the surface of the by now predacious crawl. The track continues to twist and spit animosity with every note, beat, and syllable as it persistently evolves for a staggering first assault of the release.

The following Between the Dying and the Dead is no less vitriolic and hostile but takes little time in colouring its grievous landscape with swipes of celestial yet demonic harmonies and ravenous inventive bait. The guitars NDC coverpersistently carve rich grooves and ingenious hooks into the body of the song whilst bass and drums sculpt a bestial baiting. It is a glorious ferocity soaked in rabid dread but unafraid to spare room for a fire bred solo and additional imaginative detours. The track is at its strongest and most potent when it is going for the jugular but all the unpredictability and at times unsure turns, definitely keep the imagination engrossed. Its stirring presence is emulated by the barbaric Intelligent Design, another slaughter of the senses which is prone to flirtations of sonic and fiery melodic scorching as well as intriguing almost wrong footing exploits. Not as gripping as the first pair the track still leaves a hunger in place which is further healthily fed.

Pandemic of Ignorance stalks ears from its first breath, its shoulders heavy laden with hate over a spine of rhythmic bile wrapped in vehemence spawned grooves. It is a pestilential predator, its slow crawl sheer intimidation until eventually breaking free of its reins for a throat tearing onslaught, ears and senses overwhelmed by a storm of merciless aural and lyrical rancor. It is a compelling violation which sets emotions up for the outstanding Praise the Lord of Negation. It also is a song which flies for the jugular, this time with a swarm of sonic pestilence and rhythmic cruelty; that alone baits and traps a new greed within the passions but it is the insatiable maniacal fury to its psychotic repetitious seducing which hits the sweet spot.

The leviathan weighted crawl of The Anatomy of Disgust wrapped in similarly laboured but magnetic grooves comes next, its sultry flames of guitar across bloodlust driven rhythms and destructive riffery highly satisfying but lacking the spark of certainly its predecessor. The animalistic Anagamin finds its own incendiary fuse to invigorated responses, its pestilence coated prowl inspiring an animosity clad weave of invention which pushes the song enticingly into the grinning imagination. In many ways the album ebbs and flows, to be fair not in quality and individual skills but in degrees of success with personal tastes. As the following rapaciously consuming title track and the carnivorous Vertigo prove there is never a track where Near Death Condition does not bewitch and threaten with their inventive sanguinity, or impress.

Evolving Towards Extinction closes with the deliciously nagging Communing with Emptiness, a track swarming with serpentine grooves and riffs around the ever impressive artillery of disorientating drum voracity and dual vocal abrasions, and finally Nostalgia for Chaos. The final song is a beast in nature and stature as well as gait, but as the previous song endowed with some scintillating and feverishly enjoyable guitar enterprise. The ferocious incitement brings the album to a formidable and rapturously thrilling conclusion leaving the listener breathless but wholly satisfied. It is an album which also gets better and more potent over time, still undulating with some of its moments but with a baseline of rich satisfaction, a strong recommendation of Near Death Condition and album to all extreme metal fans is a no brainer.

Evolving Towards Extinction is available now on Unique Leader Records @ http://www.indiemerch.com/uniqueleader/band/near-death-condition

http://www.neardeathcondition.ch/

8.5/10

RingMaster 17/07/2014

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Architect Of Seth – The Persistence Of Scars

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The Persistence Of Scars is an album which leaves you bruised and disorientated, mentally exhausted and at times bewildered, but mostly the debut album from French Progressive death metallers Architect Of Seth, leaves you transfixed and aggressively keen for its unrelenting unpredictability and technical magnetism. It is a demanding release which definitely needs a concentrated time to unravel its creative maelstrom, something which arguably is never wholly achieved even after a tide of visits, but it is a ‘chore’ always welcome and rewarding.

Architect Of Seth was forged in 2006 as a solo project by guitarist/vocalist Paul Rousseaux who released a pair of demos, Eldorado that same year and Pax-Labor in 2007. Subsequently guitarist Yohann Kochel linked up with the Caen project, expanding a sound and depth which takes inspirations from the likes of Death, Theory in Practice, Coroner, Pestilence, Nocturnus, Bathory, Emperor, Martyr, and Necrophagist into its technical and ravenous invention. The Persistence Of Scars is the pair’s debut album, a creative tempest exploring themes of hate, science, religion, and nature within a ferocious furnace of imagination and hostility which whether venomously cascading or rabidly savaging the senses unleashes a spellbinding intrigue. The album is often mentally corrosive and physically punishing, rarely an easy listen but always offering a lure which locks in the imagination and appetite.

The Persistence Of Scars opens up with LFDY and its gentle stroking of evocative melodies. It sets a peaceful and warm scene, the guitars casting colourful bait and coaxing skies before a lumbering rhythmic intimidation and darker shadows to all facets, cloud over the landscape. It is a portentous breath now igniting the imagination, the foreplay to a thrash driven onslaught of rapaciously intensive riffs, animosity clad rhythms, and the hoarse scowls of Rousseaux. It is a relatively straight forward assault, though already teasing as sonic and unpredictable designs begin to unveil their tenacity. Now settled into its tempestuous purpose, the guitars of the two protagonists twist and cast a maze of persistently testing enterprise through the song. It is the beginnings of a spiralling technically striking ingenuity which at times makes perfect sense and in others just loses thoughts and understanding, which is where repeat plays is essential with an album like this. There is cohesiveness and fluidity to it all though which never falters in its hold of an increasingly hungry appetite for what is developing and never derails the malevolent toxicity and ravenous brutality at the song’s core.

The first track is alone an exhaustive tsunami of predacious imagination, so with six more similarly sculpted propositions to come, a legacy of hard work is inevitable starting with Engender of Confusion. Riffs and grooves are immediate and as intensive as the rhythms alongside them, each worming under and pounding the skin respectively as the caustic spite of Rousseaux scars the air around them. With crystalline shards of keys flirting with ears within the by now merciless torrent of vicious charm and debilitating ideation, whilst orchestral tempting plays with emotions, the track sears flesh and thoughts as it seduces both ears and mind with insatiable inventive rabidity. Arguably easier on the psyche because of its relatively brief length compared to the first, the song also finds a greater clarity to its no less bedlamic ingenuity before making way for Transhumance Astrale. The third track takes little time in firing up the primal instincts with a torrent of thrash/metal suasion before warping it all with breath-taking skills and perplexing yet deliciously gripping, psyche violating creative intercourse. The track, as all, is a storm of technical mastery and constantly evolving revelations to again captivate and fluster, but most of all ruggedly enthral.

By this point already the album is wearing down the senses it has to be said, though not the hunger for more. As mentioned, in many ways it is not certainly physically an easy listen which is compounded as both Embrace of Anguish and Hybrid Consuming Flesh unleash their fiercely creative and intertwining inventory. The first of the pair brings some respite though with a mesmeric classically honed piano enticement to seduce ears and inflames thoughts initially. It is a bewitching piece which eventually drifts away for the impending storm. Thunderous rhythmic clouds and sonic strikes blow across the senses before a malevolent haunting and intensive juggernaut of provocative sound suffocates light and peace. Its instrumentation and aural narrative is mouth-watering, a tight capture of the passions which does lose some of its grip with the entering rage of vocals and manic invention with constantly unsettles in its turns and expulsions. At times the track is irresistible and in other moments pushes its boundaries beyond organic accessibility, yet still it entrances and steals the imagination for a pleasing if unsure success. Its successor is a more bestial provocation with a flank ferociously rippling with again unsettling ideas and creative incitement. It also offers a great emotive persuasion of keys at times, a beacon within the corrosive belly of the savage beast.

The album concludes with firstly the outstanding Tears Empty of Sadness, a track which finds a more balanced blend of extreme metal vindictiveness and technical exploration which is why it takes best track honours. Everything works perfectly, the invention of the band still flaming intensively but finding a more understanding fit with the toxic brutality of the song. Every song on The Persistence Of Scars impresses it is fair to say but this one shows the potential of the band most intensively as they further grow into and hone their undoubted skills and ingenuity. The song’s success is supported enjoyably by Teacher of Nocturna, another track to align the maniacal technical beauty and gut instinct severity of the band for a grievously strong and testing, but smoother to understand and relish creative onslaught.

The Persistence Of Scars is a great and demanding encounter which leaves a satisfied wake whilst suggesting that Architect Of Seth has the potential to create a classic ahead. This album is not it but holds all the pieces and keys to the potential sculpting of one.

The Persistence of Scars is available as a 7 track CD via Great Dane Records @ http://www.greatdanerecs.com/ or a 3 song download @ http://architectofseth.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/ArchitectOfSeth

8/10

RingMaster 17/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Keitzer – The Last Defence

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The saying goes that Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned but if the Devil wants to give her a run for her money then he could not no worse than call on German metallers Keitzer. The band has never been slow in unleashing scourges of sonic spite and brutal confrontation but they have unlocked a new vat of hostility with latest album The Last Defence. The bands fifth full-length is as ferocious as it gets; a furnace of vitriol and blast beats which leave ears and senses floundering in their own waste but within the torrential downpour the band seduces with some of the most viciously tempting grooves. The 1999 formed Keizter and album are as pissed as they can be, showing time can only intensify sonic grievances as proven by this juggernaut of contagious mayhem, an assault leaving deep bruises and open satisfaction.

The follow-up to its successful predecessor Descend Into Heresy of 2011, the FDA Rekotz released The Last Defence takes no prisoners as it treats them to some not admittedly ground-breaking but voraciously vindictive and equally rewarding metal. The album’s press release suggests it lies somewhere within the assaults of Misery Index, Marduk, and early Deicide, something you cannot dispute or want to as it definitely gives a potent hint as what Keitzer has in store within the Jörg Uken mixed and mastered hostility. From opener Bellum Indicere, an introductory instrumental, the album boils up and over with the cruellest sounds and intent available to its creators. The first track brings an atmospheric storm to bear on the senses, a controlled but tempestuous climate of sonic and rhythmic incitement which provides a fiery but kind introduction before the savage ravaging of Exist To Destroy. Ears and senses are thrust into a brawling maelstrom of sound and intensity straight away, the guitars of Nicolai Hinse and Michael Dölle squalling with all the respect of a sandstorm as the rhythmic ferocity of drummer Tim Terhechte violates air and body. Driven by the excellently malicious and varied vocal enmity of Christian Silva Chaco the second track is an incessant conflict but also the source of a rich acidic groove.

There is no respite from the furnace of sound and aggressive with This Is The Only Solution, its body of vindictiveness in sound and lyrical bitterness devoid of mercy but virulent with grinding torrents of riffs, debilitating rhythms, KEITZER_cover_WWWand vocal causticity. Unveiling a hardcore seeded rabidity to its breath and an irresistible heavily footed groove from bassist Simon Venig, the track twists and flays around with a dervish like fanaticism, those hook lined grooves bringing even more potency to a lure which is intensified in the next up Forever War. Its opening melodic enticement is soaked in intrigue and mystique, a coaxing hinting at a valiant emprise ahead. What erupts is an avalanche of precise yet insatiably hungry drum provocation and flesh flailing riffery within further scorched grooving. In some ways what emerges is underwhelming from the song’s delicious start but those disappointments are soon smothered by and lost within the barbarous intensity and heart of the track, though it does fail to ignite ears and emotions as fully as its predecessors.

   Marching Forward To Victory is another which seems to lack the spark and irresistible bait of other engagements, but it still offers a wall of jaundiced passion and accomplished violence to keep attention locked in and cowering under its punishment before the outstanding title track triggers another lustful hunger. The carnivorous grumble of the bass is ferociously addictive bait but as with most songs to be honest, it is the swarming of grooves with their waspish tenacity and virulent toxicity which sear the sweet spot. The track continues to destroy and seduce with its shifting landscape of rapacious melodic relentlessness but never loses its core of repetitive and addictive bad blood.

The album continues to impress and uncage its ruinous appeal aligned to sheer pungent loathing, the likes of the bestial Next Offensive with its twist of heavy almost stoner seeded hate bred grooves, the similarly predatory We Are The Serpents Of Doom, and the pestilential Fleshcrawl in varying degrees leaving ears ringing and passions basking. The third of the trio especially teases and exploits the imagination, its corrosive opening moving into primal seduction with salacious grooves of wanton designs within a rhythmic battering which only takes a slight breath in its steely intent to suck air in for the next up Todgeweiht. The track is a minute and a handful of seconds of raw brutality and sadistic rhythmic suasion but still lines its wrath with an admittedly slight but nonetheless persuasive groove.

The album ends on a horde of triumphs starting with Glorious Dead; to some extent the release holding back its best for the closing stretch. The track is a jubilant waltz of decay and pestilence, its swinging gait and grooved revelry a contrast to the rancid attitude of the beats and bass incitement, as well as the song’s subsequent stalking of the senses. It is a riveting and thrilling assassination of emotions which is equalled in quality and intent by Ausgelöscht, the track as malignant as it is urgent as it tears the senses apart for the intimidating but seductive corrosive grooves which follow. It is a masterful annihilation of the psyche left in the shade of the best track on the album Crusade. Its title reflects its sound and purpose, a heroic air and stature wrapping the riffs and ear caging rhythms. This eventually parts though for the inevitable uncontrollable expulsion of inhospitable and frantic enticement though it never loses its touch on the song as it reassert its dramatic, hostility driven majesty time and time again.

The album closes with the tension drenched animosity of …Before Annihilation, though it has to be said that its title is a bit late, the destruction and blood-letting having been and not exactly gone but done its worst by the time of this final exhilarating violation. It is a great end to an exhaustingly exciting release, which probably you can say is not unleashing a new bloodshed or aural corruption but certainly delivering it in a style and inventive ferocity to rigorously enjoy being pulverised by.

The Last Defence is available via FDA Rekotz now on download and CD with Black Vinyl and Ltd Edition red vinyl versions available through 7Degrees Records and @ http://keitzer.bandcamp.com/album/the-last-defence

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8.5/10

RingMaster 18/07/2014

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The Kneejerk Reactions – The Indestructible Sounds Of The…

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With a list of impossibly flavoursome bands and addictively thrilling releases on a CV longer than the list of excuses for Luis Suarez’s recent mid-match snack, the ubiquitous veteran rocker Sir Bald Diddley (aka Hipbone Slim) brings one of those stirring incitements out to play with a brand new album. The Indestructible Sounds Of The… is the new feverishly fleshed, raw breathed proposition from The Kneejerk Reactions, a release which casts out a rampant revelry of feet inducing garage bred rock ‘n’ roll aligned to a passion sparking sixties beat tempting. It is a flame of vintage sounds in the fresh distinctive framing of modern devilry amidst the unique creative juices of Sir Bald. Across its energetic and insatiably gleeful presence, essences of inspirations such as The Pretty Things, The Kinks, The Downliners Sect, Them, The Yardbirds, Bo Diddley, Chuck Berry, Link Wray, Howlin’ Wolf, Jimmy Reed, The Sonics, and many more tease and openly spice up the party but only to add additional rich colour to the magnetic tapestry flirting with the imagination and emotions. The album is a stirring and unapologetically contagious provocateur which leaves appetite and feet wanting only more.

The Dirty Water Records released The Indestructible Sounds Of The… is the successor to The Electrifying Sound Of … which came out in 2008, though between albums there was the band’s contribution on a 2013compilation of tracks and bands Sir Bald has treated ears with which went under Sir Bald’s Battle Of The Bands. The new album which has really been too long in the coming, also brings Bruce Brand on rhythmic enticement, the drummer as keen a collector of bands as Sir Bald with the likes of Billy Childish, Hipbone Slim And The Knee Tremblers, Thee Headcoats, Thee Mighty Caesars, and Thee Milkshakes in his ever increasing résumé. His presence ensures a healthy bait of beats are in store which the opening Houdini easily proves.

The song instantly lures in ears with a delicious bass groove within a sway of Farfisa organ bred expression and a rhythmic pull as potent as the dark tones of the first key protagonist. The heroic call of the bass persists across the whole body of the song, providing one of those irresistible lures which allows guitars and keys to dance with unbridled frivolity through locked in ears. The vocals equally revel in the knowledge that the listener is caught by that prime hook, their raw and keen expression adding to the evolving wash of sound and enterprise wrapping that irresistible spine. It is a thrilling start to the festivities, one which the following I Want You To Love Me makes a keen attempt to emulate, though without quite matching its success. A pungent Stones breath adds wantonness to the restrained stroll of the song, a controlled walk guided by commanding beats and coloured by sizzling flourishes of guitar invention and organ crafted sultry hues for a vibrantly pleasing encounter.

Both It’s a Jungle Out There and Mover and a Shaker keep the temperature and fun high if again without finding the same spark as the first incitement. The first of the two sways in with a mix of surf and psychedelic smouldering which soon incites another infectious rhythmic shuffle and vocal glee as the track expands its warm and energetic charms. Again the guitar solo ignites an extra spark of satisfaction, whilst the song itself has feet and emotions up on their toes ready for its successor, a track which entices with a blues rock fever to its prowling temptation. With a growl to the vocals and salaciousness to the keys, the song is an insatiable romance for the ears, though soon looking a little pale against the outstanding Batgirl, I Love You. A spice of The Troggs offers its suggestiveness as the song opens with jangly scythes of guitar and punchy beats lorded over by great vocal tempting from Sir Bald and the band. The song is a romp which does not lose its control but still exhausts with an unrelenting dramatic seducing of limbs and appetite.

If I Had My Way brings its own keen accepted stomp next, beats and guitars a net of enthralling beckoning which the keys paint with evocative expression as vocals croon with anthemic glee. It is a deliciously swinging provocateur swiftly equalled by Give in to Temptation, another song where initial beats and bass seduction set up thoughts and passions for a riveting ride. There is an earthiness to the song, especially on its rhythmic side, which grips attention, a shadowed moodiness which superbly tempers the heated glaze of organ and flames of guitar. Though taking longer than other songs to convince, given time the track makes a just undeniably convincing declaration.

The pair of Pounding and Out of Reach offer rigorously enjoyable propositions but neither find the hooks or teasing to make a lingering success. The first is an acidic shimmering of keys over a rugged terrain of beats and guitar stabs whilst the second is a coarsely surfaced and snarling slice of satisfying rock ‘n’ roll. It again is missing something but as its predecessor still brings a broad smile to the lips and pleasure to the emotions. Between them though the instrumental Volatile lies mischievously, a wicked blaze of surf seeded humid sonic seduction gifted to ears. The guitars glisten with creative and expressive sweat whilst the keys glow with tropical elegance, their union a sticky tempting to which the chilled prowling of the bass and the inescapable call of Brand’s beats add an anthemic virulence.

The two closing tracks keep it all flying high with maybe less steamy but just as potent energy and contagion. Out of Here comes first, an instantly firmly treading stomp with a keen and pleasing if not overwhelming entrance. It is nevertheless an easy offer to fully embrace, even more so with the persuasive vocals but it is when the song hits its chorus that it transforms into a major pinnacle of the album. It is not a demanding or particularly unique moment but boy its epidemic catchiness is pure aural addiction. The song is a trigger to ignite any bland party or tepid day, an unrelenting tempter to ignite any unrewarding emotion. It is followed by the spicy heat of Habenero, a caustically coloured fire of melodic taunting and rhythmic coaxing within another hard to resist anthem of intent and body provoking devilry, the perfect ending to a festival of fevered sound.

The Indestructible Sounds of . . . is without doubt a real treat, maybe not the most corruptive temptress Sir Bald has uncaged but with so many great and varied releases and endeavours around him favourites and personal tastes dictate which finds a bigger or lesser success. It is a thoroughly enjoyable encounter for body and soul though and The Kneejerk Reactions a band no one should be slow in checking out.

The Indestructible Sounds of . . . is available now @ http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/store-2/#!/~/category/id=10017015&offset=0&sort=addedTimeDesc on 12” vinyl and download.

8/10

RingMaster 16/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Lesch-Nyhan – Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome

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The first album since their return, Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome makes a ravenous and richly satisfying confrontation from US death metallers Lesch-Nyhan. The successor to the band’s 1991 demo Indistinguished Remains, the seven track savagery is a rewardingly imposing and thrillingly incessant beast of a proposition, a bestial encounter recalling the seeds and original toxicity of the Philadelphia quartet whilst equally holding an unhealthy dose of modern intrigue and fresh faced twists. It is not an album to blow extreme metal away but certainly a ravaging to make Lesch-Nyhan’s comeback a highly joyous and thrilling one.

Formed in 1989 by vocalist Gary Hadden with brothers, Mark (drums) and Anthony Delacandro (guitar), Lesch-Nyhan was soon completed by bassist Greg Oreski and guitarist Mike Carr. Quickly getting to play live shows with the likes of Suffacation, Incantation, Crucifier, and Ripping Corpse, the band released their demo in 1991 from which the band was invited to play a showcase in front of numerous label representatives. What followed though was the demise of the band; a slow falling apart which new members could not bring any halt to with the band stopping in 1994. Fast forward to 2012 and a discussion between Hadden and guitarist Rob Vanderveer (a member of the last line-up of the band), about reigniting things, to “Put our stamp on this shit”. A year later saw Lesch-Nyhan reform with a re-issue of Indistinguished Remains on Horror Pain Gore Death Productions, just as the new album. With guitarist Jack Carmichael, bassist Chris Miller, and drummer Mark Stainthorpe alongside Hadden, Lesch-Nyhan has produced a riveting scourge of sound and intent with Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome, a furious hostility sure to excite those with an appetite of bands such as Autopsy, Bolt Thrower, Carcass, Gorguts, Immolation, and Napalm Death.

Recorded live in the studio helping to bring the raw brute creative force of Lesch-Nyhan to life, the album opens with World Destruction, a track as expected from its title with all the hostility and rancor to bring all before it to its frontcoverknees. It also comes with a passions binding groove which from its first breath grinds and worms deeply into the psyche as rhythms cascade voraciously down on the senses. Complete with the barbarous rancor of Hadden’s throat and the nagging contempt of the bass, it is an irresistible blast of insidious feuding which ignites appetite and passions just as forcibly as the album itself.

Its stunning start is not quite matched by the following Septic Hole and Flock Of The Misfortunate, though it is more to do with its might than their failings. The first of the two again is offering a scathing infection soaked groove around with rhythms bring a barbaric unpredictability and guitars a sonic smog of contagious endeavour. Vocally Hadden lurches syllable after syllable across the senses, his delivery breeding a pestilential persuasion which is as sinister and merciless as the predacious sounds scarring his way. It is another masterful proposition if without bringing too many surprises, similarly as its successor. The album’s third track prowls with purposeful weight and predation, every riff and rhythmic provocation concentrated in its oppressive incitement which an emerging fiery but respectful groove cannot defuse. With the vocals at their most demonically intimidating and caustic, the track sends primal shivers down the spite but fails to find the same spark to ignite the passions as the opener and subsequent tracks hold.

Bathed In Phlegm returns the senses to a tempestuous torrent of frenetic riffs and rhythms bred from the darkest despair. It is a storm which has a rein on its hunger though, switching intensities of gait and ferocity for a filth clad waltz of insurgent sounds and rabid animosity which ebbs and flows in its voracity and ultimately success. To be fair though it is a proposal which ears and emotions welcome with open submissive arms, but one again only stirring up the passions rather than igniting them. The following Regurgitation Through Decapitation has little problem in seizing imagination and those passions, such its corrosive beauty and invention. Marking the moment where the album reveals it’s most potent and addictive nature, the song thunders against ears with a wall of barbaric rhythms and an intensively fused swarm of riffs. It is tsunami of spite and malignancy turned into a sonic vendetta in turn driven by a great dual squall of vocal spite from Hadden feverishly backed by Miller. The song stomps and rages with little regard for the health of its recipients, bass and drums crafting a frame of tortuous entrapment which any dungeon would be proud of whilst the guitars and vocals lay waste with an emotion violation of hellacious enterprise.

The glorious rhythmic coaxing which brings the title track into view is one of those instinctive baits there is no resistance to, an insatiable coaxing which only increases its toxic potency when aligned to the serpentine bred vocal cancer brought by Hadden. It is not long before the enthralling leviathan tones of the bass stalk air and guitars spread their caustic waves, the emerging blend of ferocious rapaciousness only reaching deeper into the psyche and greedy hunger inspired by the album. Roving with pack like relentlessness, the track is a predator of sound and bestial appetite, its grinding incitement and gutturally shared narrative an evil suasion to unrelentingly and sublimely excite the whole body.

Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome is brought to a powerful close by Internal War And Hate, a final purge of hope and security brought with an increasingly dangerous consumption of single minded grooves and scarring riffs within a network of bass rabidity and rhythmic enmity. It is an outstanding end to a thrilling encounter, not one as we said to turn extreme metal on its head but a release to easily place Lesch-Nyhan back in the heart and intensive spotlight of death metal.

Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome is available now via Horror Pain Gore Death Productions @ http://hpgd.bandcamp.com/album/lesch-nyhan-syndrome

https://www.facebook.com/LeschNyhanMetal

8.5/10

RingMaster 16/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Zaleski / Ugly Zoo Split

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Fleeting Youth Records brings the year another striking and attention grabbing split uniting the debut releases of two potently emerging US bands. Combining the Void EP from Ohio grunge gaze band Zaleski with the self-titled EP of Pennsylvania post-hardcore quartet Ugly Zoo for one pleasingly unhealthy and compelling intrusion on the senses, the release is an exciting introduction to two potential drenched bands. Raw and uncompromising, both bands savage attention as they ignite a strong appetite for their caustic persuasions of sound and intent, their endeavours resulting in one bruising and intrigue soaked experience.

Athens trio Zaleski open up the furious engagement with five tracks of abrasing and predacious imagination. Their sound is enthralling and pleasingly unpredictable, the songs a corrosive blend of punk, grunge, and shoegaze which still only hints at their unruly and unpolished swarm of sound. Opening track Red Walls from its first breath lays a sonic hand on ears, a harsh coaxing soon joined by a further thickening of the guitar’s abrasive enticement within a belligerently antagonistic rhythmic assault and heavily throated bass lures. The song is a scourge of sound but with a melodic yet doom filtered mellow breath which tempers and invigorates the enterprise and senses equally. The rawness of production and sound adds to the seductive intensity squalling around ears for an enthralling and intriguing first and lingering impression.

The following Snake Eyes Baby flames with a brooding intensity and melodic caress with thoughts of My Bloody Valentine and Birdland brewing initially before it expels a riot of feverish energy and resourceful incitement for an incendiary climax. The impressive track fires up the passions which its predecessor in comparison just tickled for a brief but provocatively incisive proposition. Its more elegant seducing is contrasted by Where Are We?, a track with a ferociously shimmering surface to another sway of melodic coaxing melodically and vocally. That gentleness is soon swamped by a voracious tide of sonic rabidity and a more hardcore edged vocal delivery for an instantly appealing but intimidating incitement. Whereas some tracks like the previous one make an immediate success others like this take longer to build their suasion but in varying degrees achieve their welcome goal.

Zaleski complete their side of the spilt with the atmospherically haunting instrumental Silent Hills and the smouldering seduction of Ghosted, a track much like their second which slowly winds around senses and emotions with a searing yet soothing croon of melodic expression within a tempestuous sonic surface driven by an enjoyably varied vocal delivery and expression. It and Snake Eyes Baby take best track honours on this side of the release with ease, each fuelled by the promise which lights all Zaleski’s tracks whilst providing an extra inventive adventure which ignites a hungry appetite.

Ugly Zoo create a sound which is garage punk and noise rock spliced with psyche devilry, and within seconds steals a march on its co-contributors with an irresistible charge of carnivorously predacious riffs, rabidity drenched basslines, and a discord flushed wash of riotous vocals as Westboro Deepthroat erupts in the ear. As soon as its roars provocatively there is a similarity to UK band The St Pierre Snake Invasion which is never a bad likeness to have. The track swaggers and taunts with imaginative bait forged by the punk inspired guitars and crisply swiping rhythms, but it is the demonic snarl of the bass and the mass scythes of vocals which seal the impressive deal.

Jawbreaker takes the outstanding start up another level, its opening gnaw of that great bestial bass sound with matching rapacity from riffs alone a gripping enticement. Fusing a rawer blaze of rock crafted spiky grooves and again dual vocals, the song brawls with and inspires the senses for a potently flavoursome fury which sets up an already greedy attention for the exceptional Jesus Sneakers. Their third song slings a contagious net of pounding beats with another ridiculously riveting bass lure at the ear; that alone addiction sparking but once the guitars spew their sonic ingenuity lined ferocity and vocals squall with vivacious revelry, the song becomes an insatiable stomp with energetic wantonness. It does not end there though as imagination grips the song further with shards of crystalline sparks and crazed warped tempting which adds a truly unpredictable beauty to the encounter, a track which feels like it is inventing itself as it goes.

The final Ugly Zoo track If We Don’t Succeed We Run the Risk of Failure reinforces the striking first look at the band, its body driven by a garage punk stride with boisterous sinews and combative rhythms, The outcome is a protagonist which is unsure whether to party or create havoc but in the end plumps for the former with unrelenting enthusiasm and devilish creative intensity. It is a thrilling end to an exhausting and thoroughly enjoyable release.

Feeding the primal personal wants of our desires, Ugly Zoo provide the most thrilling and exhilarating slices on the release but both they and Zaleski lay down a quality foundation recruiting long term attention upon the pair whilst suggesting big things ahead for both their invigorating presences.

The Zaleski /Ugly Zoo Split is out now digitally and as limited edition cassette @ http://fleetingyouthrecords.bandcamp.com/album/zaleski-ugly-zoo-split

http://zaleski.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/uglyzoo/

Zaleski 8/10

Ugly Zoo 9/10

RingMaster 15/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Thom Bowden – Searching The Brittle Light

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From the release of his striking and impressive The Damage EP of 2012 there has been a healthy dose of acclaim placed around UK musician Thom Bowden and keen anticipation bred for his debut album. This week sees the unveiling of Searching The Brittle Light and those hopes are sure to be satisfied with the ten track encounter. It is not a release which impacts as potently and consistently as Bowden’s previous proposition but certainly it brings another wash of the rich potential within his songwriting and highly agreeable sound.

Surrey based, Bowden takes inspirations from the likes of The White Stripes, Nick Drake, Dresden Dolls, Fugazi, and Neil Young into his imagination catching enterprise. As mentioned The Damage EP brought strong attention and responses from fans and media alike, something you can only see the album repeating and increasing. A collection of songs written when Bowden was ‘at a low point in his life’, the album was recorded with and mixed by Steve Albini (Pixies, Nirvana, Manic Street Preachers) and mastered by Steve Rooke at Abbey Road. Inspired by some advice offered whilst the artists was in Chicago by Kim Deal, the album brings a raw honest intent and beauty to the ears. There is also a slightly more adventurous variation across the songs than on the last EP, a move you can only respect and embrace even with its slightly mixed success in comparison to the consistency of the previous release.

With guitarist Richard George and drummer Steve Matthews alongside Bowden, the album opens strongly with Click!, a song taking mere seconds to seduce ears and thoughts with its opening seduction of sultry blues kissed flames. a2137786508_2The slow swipes of guitar are soon joined by punchy beats and a darkly drawing bassline before the great expressively twanged and unpredictable voice of Bowden starts revealing the lyrical narrative. His voice and a rich essence of the music has a Frank Black like temptation which only adds to the smouldering enticement, an invitation which burns increasingly brighter as the song evolves and spreads its senses sizzling charms. The feisty stride of the track is an incessant call on the passions whilst the increasingly warped vocal delivery which by this point has a more My Red Cell essence, Bowden sounding similar to frontman Russell Toomey of the defunct Welsh band, only captivates with mischievous bait. It is a strong and gripping start to the album which without lighting fires sets up a keen appetite for its offering, a hunger soon spicily fed by the second song.

So So Long makes a controlled and infectious entrance, guitars and rhythms a simple but entrancing lure to which Bowden’s grazing tones lay angst spawned invention and caustic passion. The track never lifts its gait to anything more than a slow determined canter but with expulsions of sonic heat and expressive melodic energy, the song irresistibly wins over ears, again thoughts of the previously mentioned Welsh band coming to the fore. It is a masterful slice of sonic magnetism bringing a licking of lips. Its potent presence is followed by the ballad My Arms, the song a union of voice, guitar, and emotive textures which certainly stirs up thoughts and attention but brings an unexpected and underwhelming halt to the thrust of the album. Obviously a highly personal offering, it is hard and impossible to dismiss, or not enjoy, but the song is a wrongly positioned rein on the passions for personal preference.

The following Control brings the temperature and energy back with accomplished and thrilling enterprise. Rhythms roll invitingly through the ears as guitars swerve and let fly with melodic scythes of enticement and sonic tempting which reawakens a thirsty imagination. There is a definite eighties new wave feel to the track, another shade of familiarity which in different designs attractively flirts with most of certainly the rockier numbers on the release. As it continues to tease and impress, the glorious song casts a web of inventive guitar endeavour, melodic mischief, and sonic alchemy to treat and seduce the emotions; it all aided by an emerging Pixies sounding toxicity.

Next up How About It? slips into a gentler hug of emotive intimacy and melodic caressing around a spine of shadow involving rhythmic invention from drums and bass. It is a slowly burning temptation which takes longer than certainly the previous song to persuade but emerges as a deliciously riveting and evocative highlight of the release. Its broody success is followed by the forty five second instrumental , a piece which is just there before the outstanding With Pace unleashes its grunge spawned sinews and punkish desires. As its title suggests, the track romps with swift, heavily thumping feet and fiery riffs around which rapacious grooves and fuzz encased vocals flirt and rage respectively. There is no escaping a Nirvana comparison but as elsewhere it only spices up the brawling encounter. The album and Bowden seems to wear inspirations on their sleeve, definitely more than the EP, to predominantly bring stronger aural colours to embrace.

The raucous air and exhaustive pleasure of the triumph is swiftly tempered and brought back to the ground with the folk seeded reflection of The Water Is Cold, a decent and strikingly performed song but again an underwhelming shift in scenery and suasion. Its emerging emotional stringed flight and expressive vocal coaxing does light thoughts and feelings, but there is the thought that the track would be better served elsewhere in the order or set on a separate release to find the reaction it deserves.

The bluesy plaintive cry of In The Ground comes next to stir up a nest of satisfied thoughts and emotions with its persistent tendrils of sonic imposing and fiery enticement around another roar of vocal lament and expression. It is a track which you want more of before the final elegant balladry of Sweet And Tender brings the album to a musically and lyrically rueful close. Soaked in more folk seeded melancholy it is a captivating end to a fine if inconsistent album.

     Searching The Brittle Light is an impressive next step for Bowden but because of its intent and bravery in stretching its boundaries may be fails to match its predecessor. The songs are a clear step on in craft and maturity let alone invention but the album feels like two releases in one which defuses its impact whereas separating them into EPs of rock and ballad seeded tracks might have brought the showcase and clarity they deserve. Nevertheless Thom Bowden is an exciting talent which will be creating remarkable and keenly devoured statements ahead, we for one wait eagerly.

Searching The Brittle Light is available digitally, on vinyl, and CD now via Audio Candle Records and @ http://thombowden.bandcamp.com/

http://thombowden.com/

7.5/10

RingMaster 15/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Ghost Wolves – Man, Woman, Beast

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Rock duos have never been an absent feature of rock ‘n’ roll across the decades, the likes of The Everleys, The Carpenters, and alongside all those which spring to your mind right now The White Stripes all notable irresistible protagonists. It feels right now though that there is a real wealth and strength in depth to two-pronged innovative rock bands. The UK has the caustic garage punk/rock ‘n’ rollers The Creeping Ivies, Canada the raw and sonically insatiable might of The Black Frame Spectacle, whilst the US can offer up the country punk of The Barnyard Stompers and the blues punk fire of In The Whale. These are just four of the savagely potent enticements within the underground to which you can forcibly add The Ghost Wolves.

Hailing from Austin, TX, the duo of husband and wife Carley and Jonathan Wolf create a delta blues/garage rock inspired storm which stirs up the imagination and steals the passions like a fully loaded dose of sonic moonshine. Its raw and addictive recipe is irresistibly unleashed in a diverse mix of flavours within the band’s debut album Man, Woman, Beast. It is a rugged yet fuzzily seductive stomp of an encounter which leaves senses sore, bloated, and desperate for more.

Formed in 2011, The Ghost Wolves has spent the years since garnering more and more acclaim and support as well as a feistily growing fan base. Released on Nashville’s Plowboy Records, Man, Woman, Beast follows the success of the band’s 12” EP In Ya Neck! of 2011 and the following year the 7” single Getchya Hip Thrust, both on Pau Wau Records. The album already acclaimed in their homeland, has all the abrasing charm and enthralling enterprise, not forgetting sheer unruly beauty, to push the band into a wider world bred spotlight,

The first slice of infection is Shotgun Pistol Grip, the opening track an immediate sizzling bait to seduce ears and emotions. The heavy throaty tones of Carley’s guitar ignites ears right away to be joined within a breath or two by the tgw-620x620similarly coaxing crisp beats of Jonathan. There is an almost cantankerous swagger to the track, its rhythmic shoulders and melodic intent as feistily imposing as they are engagingly alluring. It is rapacious bait which steels its sinews to hold is tempting as the mischievously cute and flirtatiously melodic vocals of Carley caress ears, assisted as impressively by hubby. There is also an underlying surf rock breeze to the song which embraces the senses before making way for the fiery Gonna Live. Brewed in a richer distillery of blues, the track is an instinctively alluring prime rock ‘n’ roll canter. Guitars flame and groan with scuzz kissed toxicity whilst the vocals and chorus produce a rock revelry which demands attention from feet and emotions.

The ridiculously potent and thrilling start to the album is continued with Baby Fang Thang, a song which swings its melodic scuzz wrapped hips like a lap dancer from the first sway whilst beats punctuate the seduction with their own distinct potency. As with so many of the songs, verse and build ups are siren-esque especially vocally, but it is the toxicity of the chorus which sparks lustful passion, and in no greater success than on the third song. With a temptation which is like a fusion of Daisy Chainsaw and Karn8, the song licks at the senses with the salacious wickedness of a temptress and naive charm of a sultry breeze.

Both the coarse boned Grave Dollas and Ride The Wolf keep things aflame in quality and ears, the first a anthemic romp of energised rhythms and swinging vocal lures within another squalling blaze of blues lilted guitar colour. Its successor is a slow prowl of salaciously grinning vocals and sonic beckoning, the sultry seductive air of the song again reminding strongly of Karn8 whilst the heavier garage rock predation which equally crawls over the senses has a seventies psychedelic essence which also embraces flavours to be found in artists like Hasil Adkins, The Cramps, The White Stripes, and Morass of Molasses.

I Was Wrong uncages another sinew built stomp, rhythms casting a firm net for the twin vocals and smouldering guitar attack to tease ears with devilish efficiency, before the next up Itch unveils an earthy groove to lose inhibitions to. Whereas the last couple of songs richly pleased but lacked some of the lust breeding power of earlier tracks, this song is another Devil spawned seducing which wakes up the imagination and ardour fuelled passion like popping candy in the mouth, every note and beat a frenetic but fluid croon to set passions of eager edge. A welcome easily exploited by the intoxicating I’m Yo Mudda, its winding and swerving blues filtered grooves pure sonic manna.

The riveting limb enslaving Attack, Attack, Attack hits another pinnacle for the album, its veins pumped with fevered rapaciousness and hungry suasion driven by rhythmic stabs and vocal pokes. It is a sensational stomping which leaves the body breathless and hunger burning as greedily as the passions. Ensuring that the song’s glory is pushed to the final song, Dangerous Moves stands before ears with vocal enticement blazing radiantly within waves of blues toned guitar caressing, both leading to another crazily addictive and wonderfully toxic choruses. The song is a brilliant and pungent furnace of sound and anthemically evocative hues which sums up The Ghost Wolves perfectly.

Now we said these were the last songs and they are on the download version but we suggest going for the CD which comes with an extra trio of songs, tracks recorded live which you do not want to miss. The slow lumbering almost erotic beauty of Lies I Told is alone a treat but White Lily is the big prize, the song a scuzz lined dance of captivating beats and irrepressibly magnetic grooves all under the spell of the dual vocal temptation. The hypnotic rhythmic hex which opens up Mosquito is also a massive draw whilst the song once into its heart lays down a mesh of sonic bruising which ravenously grips an unrelenting appetite for the album.

Man, Woman, Beast is one of the real triumphs and pleasures of the year and The Ghost Wolves, a band to set the primal heart and beast in us all free.

Man, Woman, Beast is available now @ http://theghostwolves.bandcamp.com/album/man-woman-beast-2014 and on CD/vinyl through Plowboy Records! @ http://plowboyrecords.com/store/the-ghost-wolves/

http://www.theghostwolves.com

9/10

RingMaster 14/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Tina V – Cut The Tent

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Known as the vocalist/guitarist with the excellent UK rock band This Wicked Tongue, a quartet who released one of the best singles of 2013 in Mick Hucknall’s Hair, Tina V has stepped forward with her debut album to show a captivating diversity to her presence, songwriting, and invention. Consisting of ten tracks which employ essences of rock, electro, folk, pop and much more, Cut The Tent is an album which persistently dances and rocks, seduces and stirs up the senses. Most of all it is a proposition which irresistibly ignites the imagination and passions, an encounter set to thrust the lady into the keenest of spotlights you suspect.

Tina V, the performing name of Christina Maynard, is the founding member of This Wicked Tongue which began in 2010, not long after she had started performing solo. At the start the band beefed up her existing compositions before evolving into its own material to increasing attention and success with fans and media around the globe. Now Tina gives her solo side a sizeable airing and it is hard not to be thoroughly impressed and excited for her first offering. Recorded with Dave Draper (Spunge, Dodgy, Kerbdog), Cut The Tent follows her You Don’t Know Me EP of 2011, a release which it seems like us a great many missed, something you cannot see happening with the new album. The years between her solo offerings has seen This Wicked Tongue release a trio of increasingly acclaimed EPs as well as that triumph of a single, with Tina also engaging in numerous collaborations within styles from dubstep to classic rock. It is easy to suggest though that her finest hour to date is with Cut The Tent.

As soon as opening track Going Home embraces ears there is the feeling of a returning friend, the tones and potent voice of Tina as memorable and impressive as with her band but also with an immediately new and fresh twist and pledgeadventure. The first track cups the ear in thudding dulled beats and the harmonic beauty of Tina’s voice initially for a gentle caressing which grows through just as seductive harmonies as an electro seeded energy slowly but openly raises its head. Tina is soon unveiling the full lyrical narrative whilst adding a hint of fire to the encounter, a heat soon expelled forcibly with a melodic rock thrust of purposeful riffs and swiping rhythms. In full swing the track strides like a mix of dance music and gothic heavy rock, essences of Lacuna Coil seeping into the magnetic incitement for a rich and compelling start to the release.

You kind of assume from the track that you have an early handle of the album but those ideas are swiftly left floundering as the deliciously mischievous Feel Less steps in next. An acoustic punkish wipe of guitar makes the first suasion on ears before being swamped by a glorious jangle of guitars within a maze of melodic enterprise. This masterful weave intensifies as the song reaches deeper in thoughts and passions with its inventive endeavour, hooks and melodies a constant tango of broadly grinning revelry. It is pop rock at it very best with a puppeteer ability to make feet and passions dance to its every whim.

The title track comes next, agitated beats skirting Tina’s emotive tones with fuzz lent guitar lures adding evocative hues to the emerging melody sculpted canvas of emotion and elegance. With keys and harmonies adding their colour to the evolving scenery, a landscape which seamlessly punches with sinew bred steps or glides with stringed beauty, the song is a flame of dramatic melodic rock. It adds yet another facet to the character of the album as does the brilliantly bewitching Don’t Cry. A piano croon matched by additional keys makes the first breath of temptation before effect surfaced vocals trip eagerly between their evocative lines. It is a strong draw but it is when the song kicks off its shoes for a shuffle of fascinating almost devilish invention that it explodes to a new mesmeric plateau. Again rock and pop merge for a lasting suasion but equally flirtations of classical, melodic, and RnB to name just three of the flavours, add their tonic to the feisty aural wine.

The diversity keeps coming as first Could Have Saved and then First Born unveil their musically poetic ventures. The first of the two is a noir coloured captivation with pungent keys casting shadows over the vocal and musical drama brewing beneath. As intensive and sultry as it is sinisterly mysterious yet insatiably beautiful, the song is another pinnacle of the release. Its successor holds onto the tempered gothic feel as it casts its own melodic and provocative flame of sound and enterprise. A tide of irresistible harmonies and melodies veined by slight but spicy minimalistic intrigue from keys, the song engulfs the senses in a tenacious climate of sound.

The emotive balladry of And I’m Trying brings a warm breath over the senses, its body and charm epically potent but lacking the spark which ignited earlier songs whilst Golden provides another punchy pop rock canter with just a hint of country seeding. It also fails to meet the high demands implanted by its predecessors but still engages feet and emotions in a catchy and hunger feeding romp, both tracks continuing to push the album deeper into a lustful appetite.

The electro fuelled, eighties synth rock sprayed Tomorrow Comes ignites body and emotions fully again, its fire hot pop romping impossible to resist, even though it flirts with the mainstream area of the genre more than liked. To be fair though with bold rhythms and those ever commanding vocals, submission is inevitable with the track leaving a thick dose of pleasure in its wake which the closing ballad I Watch The Sunrise brings a hypnotic sunset to. With keys and Tina’s voice transfixing, the song is a final hug for thoughts and emotions, and a masterful end to a thrilling release.

If you are expecting something similar to This Wicked Tongue then you will be given much to eagerly devour, but a whole lot more varied ingenuity and enthralling invention to bask in. Cut The Intent is a masterpiece of melodic and unexpected adventure, and Tina V a presence, in whichever side of her creativity she offers, we will be increasingly pleasured by you can only suspect.

Cut The Tent is released on July 21st with the first single from the album, And I’m Trying available now.

http://www.tinaveronica.com/

http://www.thiswickedtongue.com/

8.5/10

RingMaster 11/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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