Black Sachbak – No Pay No Gain

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Strapping on a tank full of punk to their trash fuelled juggernaut of sound, Israeli metallers Black Sachbak is one of those wonderfully intrusive treats which it is impossible not to develop a lustful hunger for. Theirs is thrash metal at its most mischievous and antagonistic, a sound which most likely along with the band’s antics and attitude has led them to earn the title of or make a self-declaration that they are “the most hated band in Israel!”

Imagine the devilish thrash ferocity of Municipal Waste with the hardcore flavoured metal viciousness of Suicidal Tendencies and the punk hostility of Biohazard, and you get somewhere around the uncompromising onslaughts of Black Sachbak. The Petah Tiqua hailing and 2010 formed quartet offers a warped uniqueness which given the chance is a seriously rewarding and impressive bitch slap to ears and senses. Though originally released last year, No Pay No Gain, the band’s debut album was re-released recently through Stormspell Records on CD and Tridroid Records on cassette. It has given the world another opportunity to discover a thoroughly compelling band, one certainly all thrash fans should seize with both hands.

No Pay No Gain takes barely seconds to induce full attention with an extra lick of the lips as the opening rock ‘n’ roll fanfare of Haircut I Never Got sets the fury in motion. Swiftly heavy handed thumps of beats from drummer Noam Chizo Salingre descend on the senses alongside the gruff vocal resourcefulness of vocalist Eliran Balely. Their potent bait is enhanced by the sonic endeavour from the guitar of Dor HaShamen Plaut and the meaty bass prods of Lidor Sharaby. It is a demanding entrance which just as forcibly twists into a heavy striding ferocity, riffs and rhythms almost goading ears and vocals. It is a glorious rage which is unafraid to juggle the pace of its attack and throw some wrong-footing twists into its tempestuous presence.

The outstanding start is followed by the slightly less astounding force of The IMF. It is only a dip because of the brilliance of its predecessor, the track a raucous brawl of compelling riffs and antagonistic beats speared by a virulently contagious groove. Also loaded with excellent guitar craft and enterprise with a sweet solo, the track provides another rugged inescapable trap for the passions before making way for the brief punk assault of Dubstep Sucks. Picking on the target in its title, the track roars and snarls with sonic hostility and vocal unpredictability to provide three highlights out of three for the album.

Both Marx Was Right and Beer Law keep the levels high and appetite greedy, the first flying from the traps with voracious riffs and similarly greedy rhythms ridden by the lyrically caustic and vocally savage tones of Balely. As anthemic as they come on the album, the song flirts with and barracks ears from start to finish with prime thrash ferocity equipped with a healthy strain of punk and heavy metal tenacity. Its successor provides more of the same but also takes a slower, at times stalking approach to ears. Riffs gnaw feverishly on the senses throughout whilst rhythms swing with unbridled sinews but in other moments both shift almost 180 degrees in their attack to again bring an intriguing turn of events.

     Next comes a cover of a song by an Israeli artist called Tamir Gal. Having no idea of its creator or the original, it is still safe to say that Black Sachbak has pillaged, maimed, and reinvented Soher in their own chaotic likeness. The track is pure bedlam, vocals deranged and sound disturbed into a sonic haze so that it is hard to know how to take the track. Yet it brings a broad satisfied smile before the excellent Capitalist Zombies goes for the jugular. It is a wonderful irritant, riffs and beats a hellacious ravaging whilst singular and group vocals rouse and graze the passions eagerly. Punk thrash at its best, the track is another insatiable slab of irresistible toxic and thrilling creative rabidity.

A matching blaze of voracity drives Fuck Your Law, a torrent of anger drenched vocals and riffs emulated in spite by the hostile swing of beats. Short and to the point, the track blisters ears and psyche before TV unleashes its infectious and malicious frenzy. Spiked with stabs of delicious grooves and hordes of addictive riffs, the track is a stormy treat which seduces as it batters, leaving the listener sore but blissful. Its certain triumph leads to the closing Smoke Hash, a final blitz which evolves into a scorching haze of heavy metal prowess and thrash savagery.

It is a great end to No Pay No Gain, which itself is the entrance into an exciting proposition in Black Sachbak, who surely will not be for much longer a secret to the thrash scene. The band and associated labels have given us all another chance to get in at the ground floor on their rise with No Pay No Gain; it would be rude not to take a look.

No Pay No Gain is available now via Stormspell and Tridroid Records, and @ https://blacksachbak1.bandcamp.com/album/no-pay-no-gain-3

https://www.facebook.com/BlackSachbak

RingMaster 19/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Machine Rox – Next Level

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British industrial metallers Machine Rox has never been a slouch in stirring up ears and emotions with its fiery and rapacious energy and imagination, but the London quartet has found a new covetous creative tenacity to consume the senses with new album Next Level. As its title declares, the eleven track adventure sees the band rise to a new plateau in songwriting, sound, and sheer contagious enterprise. Not exactly a game changer but an encounter to set a fierce new blaze within the landscape of industrial and electro rock, Next Level is a gripping and feistily enjoyable rampage.

Originally formed by musician/songwriter Richard K as a solo project in 2007, Machine Rox has evolved into a full line-up consisting of guitarist Val Oproiu, drummer Nuj Farrow, and Aga on keys and vocals alongside vocalist/bassist/ programmer Richard K. Employing his experiences in bands like industrial metallers Meat Machine and Global Noise Attack, and in the sharing of stages with the likes of Rammstein, Napalm Death, and Covenant, Richard after some time away from music began exploring a merger of metal and electro rock in his band’s emerging sound. It is a journey which has intensified and grown with accompanying acclaim through releases such as the Activate Your Anger EP and debut album Shout, both in 2013. Last year also saw the release of the more metal infused Intox EP, a tasty hint of the exploits to be found on Next Level, though to be fair the band’s electro and industrial side is as vocal and potently evolved on the album.

The album flirts with ears straight away through the opening crystalline electro coaxing of Lost My Mind. The first track takes little time to flex its muscles and intensity though, sinew packed riffs and rhythmic teasing combining to challenge and ignite the senses as the vocals of Richard K similarly work on thoughts with his raw expression. The electronic lure of the track provides a contagious enterprise whilst the muscular strength of the song and the vocal bait adds anthemic essences, it all adding up to a riveting and impressive start.

The melodic Front Line Assembly meets Ghost In the Static feel of the song is replaced by the more caustic breath and ferocity of Love Explosion, KMFDM and Godflesh coming to mind though as with all songs the finished recipe is all a2738925395_2Machine Rox. The second track also unleashes an insatiable energy and charge to its pulsating persuasion, synths swirling feistily around the senses whilst guitars and beats cast a heavier and darker confrontation in the relentlessly infectious endeavour. With a glorious solo adding to the proposition, the song continues the outstanding start to the release and is immediately emulated by the heavy and catchy swing of Losers In Your Game. A Marilyn Manson-esque swagger fuels carnivorous riffs and eager rhythms whilst vocally Richard K prowls ears with a provocative narrative cast by his distinctive tones, the mix another slab of inescapable virulence.

Next Level is an album which holds a greater diversity than any Machine Rox release to date, the following warm mellow embrace of Electric Sun one example of the different sides to the character of the album. It is a melodic and seductive smouldering reminding of fellow Brits MiXE1, but also a song unafraid to spread a rawer climate across its sultry canvas; keys and guitars merging extremes for a heat wave of evocative and imaginative adventure.

Both Illusion and Cycle Complete keep body and emotions aflame, the first a bubbling yet bordering on corrosive devilry gaining swift enslavement of feet and imagination, whilst the second has a sinister edge to its imposing presence and electronic fascination. A throaty bass flavouring adds to the song’s drama, its weave of noir kissed shadows soaking the otherwise magnetically fiery track driven by vibrant electronics, heavy metallic riffery, and enticing vocals of Richard and Aga. Though neither song quite finds the plateau of their predecessors, both leave an already hungry appetite greedier before making way for the bewitching instrumental Last Kamikaze. Keys and guitars entwine with melodic beauty whilst the electronic atmosphere of the track provides a mesmeric soundscape for thoughts to drift into their own adventure through. There is also a sterner intimidation offered by slow but voracious riffery, again a blend which results in a stunning incitement for ears and emotions.

The aggressive yet welcoming presence of Breathe Again comes next, its striking metal seeded attack and rabid toxicity instantly contagious as a spice reminding of Gravity Kills and Die Krupps shows itself. Another scorching solo from Val Oproiu lights the exciting and scintillating tempest, its impressive offering contrasted and matched by My Own Religion as a resonating electro temptation swallows the senses to breed a similar weighty enticement as its predecessor. Only nailed to the floor feet could resist its enthralling call whilst the raw glaze to the vocals and the scything guitar invention gives the rest of the body a welcome work over. The two songs show another twist in the nature of the album but each slightly pales against the might of Mind Game. It is a thunderous provocation, rhythms and riffs the heaviest on the album and melodies the most acidic as it evolves into an irresistible almost savage stomp which leaves thoughts and lungs breathless.

The album closes with You Belong To Me, itself another slab of industrial metal loaded with creative voracity and uncompromising attitude within heavyweight infectiousness. It is a thrilling end to an enthralling and rigorously compelling album. Next Level is without doubt Machine Rox at their most potent and thrilling yet, the start of a new adventure which should push the band into a new and greedy industrial /electronic spotlight.

Next Level is available now @ http://machinerox.bandcamp.com/album/next-level

Be sure to catch Machine Rox at the DARK7 festival at The Electrowerkz, London on October 11th

www.machinerox

RingMaster 19/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Mechatronic – Dystopia

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Though it might not be setting a blaze of originality, Dystopia the new album from Swedish synth pop band Mechatronic, is a rather charming and enjoyable encounter. It makes no demands and does not really stretch senses and imagination but the twelve- track release does offer a contagious embrace to make a very satisfying forty five minutes or so in its company.

Formed in 2002, Mechatronic consists of Wilhelm Äretun (vocals/programming) and Emma Hortlund (lyrics/synthesizers). Already under their belt the Uppsala duo has a couple of well-received albums in the shape of Promises From the Past and Dreams, of 2003 and 2012 respectively. Uniting synth and future pop into a brew which is as nostalgic as it is fresh, the band is now poised to work on feet and imagination, not forgetting attention, with the Space Race Records released Dystopia.

The album swiftly embraces ears and thoughts with opener Falling Apart, its atmospheric coaxing offering a chilled John Foxx enticing and very early Ministry like presence. The plain yet alluring vocals of Äretun add another enticing element to the start of the song, his tones flourishing further with the subsequent harmonies and energy the singer infuses into his delivery. With the synths shimmering vivaciously as they radiate infectiousness, the track leads the listener into a minimalistic but seriously catchy proposition which does not startle but certainly lights up a keen appetite for it and the album.

The strong start is easily surpassed by the following pair of Endless Search for Something and Don’t Bother to Knock. The first of the two songs strides with contagious manner and enterprise, electronic hooks and tantalising melodies enslaving the imagination whilst the vocals and their unfussy lyrics easily induce participation from its recipient. An enticing eighties breath again washes ears with elements of bands like Blancmange and Depeche Mode spicing up the temptation impressively laid down, an open familiarity enveloped with Mechatronic’s own invention to provide a riveting treat. Its successor brings a darker and more intensive weave of sound which comes wrapped in an elegant ambience of evocative melodies which swarm tenderly and provocatively over the senses. Once again, as with all tracks upon Dystopia, there is infectiousness to the song which makes a physical and emotional engagement with its magnetic persuasion very simple.

The title track comes next with an industrial seeded chill to its intriguing almost sinister aural narrative. This of course comes with another healthy dose of addictive hooks and sonic tempting which just adds to the fascinating texture and tapestry of the song. It is a potent mix of shadows and light, though for personal tastes it does not explore its darkest elements as deeply as wished, preferring to stay within the energetic pop invention of the band. It is nevertheless another twist in the presence of the release, as is Niagara, a flowing electronic waltz smothering ears is a warm and rapturous seduction. It is not the quickest persuasion on the album but turns out to be one of the most lingering and ultimately enthralling with thoughts and emotions.

Trapped in a Nightmare is another encounter to walk rich shadows musically and lyrically, a tempestuous atmosphere challenging the melodic flames glowing beneath. The song is a captivating proposal but lacks the spark and virulence of earlier songs. It still brings something inviting to the album though before the drama and intrigue of Sinister expands across the senses, its aspects living up to its name. There is a cinematic quality to the track, closing eyes bringing visions of black and white scenery around lone and lonely figures walking empty streets emotionally and physically, before a dead world erupts around them.

Across the sultry ambience and intimate emotions of Beyond the Silence and the exotically charming Broken Promises, band and album ignite a fresh wave of pleasure. The first is a sweeping seducing of picturesque melodies and suggestive sonic hues whilst the second dances with masterful simplicity and ridiculously captivating hooks. It is an outstanding romp which like the album is not trying to reinvent the scene but just give it a refreshing and joyful injection of fun. The same can be said of the next up Vicious Words, though despite being an accomplished and potently satisfying companion, it leaves no lasting impression unlike its persistent predecessor.

The album is completed by the electro pop flirtation of This Moment, a decent enough ear appeasing suasion, and the dystopian landscape of the predominantly instrumental Dying Together Isn’t Going to Solve Anything. Without setting fires, both make a fine ends to an impressively engaging proposition. Dystopia is not without niggles, the over familiarity of some songs to supposed influences and between themselves the strongest question to cast over it, but Mechatronic tenaciously succeed with the self-same songs through their irrepressible contagion and melodic invention. It makes for an easy going and rewarding encounter which will successfully light up any day.

Dystopia is available now from Space Race Records @ http://www.poponaut.de/mechatronic-dystopia-p-13266.html?osCsid=9967e8061365165712433db6cdfea4cc

http://mechatronicmusic.wordpress.com/

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mechatronic/276209142393782

RingMaster 19/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Nemost – As The Ocean Burns

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As The Ocean Burns is one of those self-released propositions which could easily be missed in the never ending torrent of offerings but deserves the strongest of attention such its impressive and riveting contents. A rich and intensely striking blend of varied ideas and flavours upon a canvas of progressive death metal, the latest album from French band Nemost is a thought provoking and imagination igniting proposition which shows the Paris quintet to be one of France’s most exciting potential loaded prospects.

Formed in 2005, Nemost are not exactly newcomers but still a relative secret outside their homeland metal scene, though As The Ocean Burns will surely have a say about that. A self-titled demo in 2008 was well-received by fans and critics with debut album The Shadow’s Trail two years later drawing greater attention and reactions for its striking sounds. Four years on with the band’s songwriting and invention evolving as potently as their skills and sound, As the Ocean Burns is a new plateau for the band and a compelling addition to the ranks of melodic and progressive death metal. It is a release which grips from its first breath, leading the listener through cavernous scenery of sonic and rhythmic intrusiveness and intimate climates of melodic and atmospheric radiance.

Pressure Nation is the first encounter and straight away embraces ears in a melodic weave of guitar temptation and heavily jabbing beats from drummer Thybo Saz’Rain. It is a warm coaxing yet holds an intimidation which is soon realised in a tempest of sonic causticity and bellowing intensity, the vocals of Arnold Petit roaring from within an imposing cloud of aggressive grooves and riffs from guitarists Pierre-Jean Catez and Samuel Eymonym. It is a muggy climate which immerses the track but still allows clarity to the gripping drama and individual inventiveness of the band. The rampaging skilled urgency of Saz’Rain is impressive baiting for the senses alongside the magnetic and heavy tones of the bassist of Thomas Krajewski but it is the enthralling guitar craft and invention which steals the biggest chunk of the limelight in the exceptional track.

The stunning start is followed by the similarly hostile and engrossing Beasts and Bullies. Grooves worm into the psyche within seconds as rhythms hurl mighty and unpredictable swipes down on ears for a threatening yet addictive nemost-as-the-ocean-burnsentrance. It would be a debilitating start but for the outstanding mix of guttural scowls and outstanding clean vocals which entwine for a glorious and aggression tempering enterprise alongside the sizzling guitar play which emerges to ignite the imagination. Already two songs in it is hard to remember too many melodic death metal encounters this good and inventive, nor as virulently contagious as the first pair of tracks are.

Diversity is as much a key to the success of As The Ocean Burns and proven by the cinematic start and ambience of Respawned. Haunting crystalline keys tease ears first, followed by an expanding electronic charm and revelry. It is just the doorway into the delicious and relentless nagging of corrosive riffs and predatory rhythms, though it retains the melodic enticement of the song’s start throughout. A new dark throat emerges in the bass whilst the vocal harmonies seem to be fuller and more provocative than ever over the maelstrom of addictive ingenuity and adventure beneath them. There is a total lack of predictability to the album and songs, every time as here, you think you have handle on its intent and direction it twists or evolves its gait, direction or simply sound to bewitch and enthral.

Both the fascinating The Aimless Endeavour with its merger of Breed 77 like Latin melodies with insidiously dark malevolence, and the smouldering antagonism of Fight turn the temperature and persuasion up on the passions, the first a heat wave of sonic enterprise and aurally incendiary ideation. Its successor has a closer intimacy and more restrained purpose to its tempest yet it still immerses the ears in an almost oppressive texture of energy, as well as a cinematic menacing from its hooks which latch onto equally gripping melodies and the smooth vocal temptation of Petit. The track would make the perfect soundtrack to the darkest adult only Bond escapade and is another massive highlight on an album offering nothing but so far.

There is an inhospitable tone to Lifeless Heat, the song feeling like it wants to violate the listener even though it too comes with a sublime sonic inventiveness from the guitars. It does not live up to its predecessors in many ways but keeps the emotions enjoyable warm for the erosive might of Sandstorm. The track is a tempest of a track, a bear like ferocity unleashed by drums and riffs in league with a venomous beauty which soaks the ever impressing vocals and toxic lure of grooves. It’s incessant almost waspish irritancy and charm lights up ears and emotions perfectly before making way for the initial gentle and ultimately scarring brilliance of The Pale Observer. The track is ultimately a blaze of malicious invention and smouldering seduction, a battling tempest in the ears which evolves its fury into another fire of stunning technical and thoughtful enterprise blessed with gripping drama.

A kind of respite for the senses comes with Hourglass, though thoughts and emotions are kept busy by the entrancing sway of elegant melodies and emotive hues within a rugged sonic wind, before the fierce splendour and rabid invention of Year of the Libra and subsequently the bordering on demonic Atomnium treat and excite. The tracks bring yet further unique character to the album, each a dramatic exploration in sound and lyrical intrigue wonderfully impossible to pin down with real comparisons, though we suggest any fans of bands such as In Flames, Opeth, Katatonia, Lamb of God, Beneath The Buried And Me, Anathema, The Contortionist and the likes will especially get a kick out of the glory that is As the Ocean Burns.

The title track brings the release to a close, a song which is probably the lightest in intensity on the album but also one of the most spellbinding with its weaving of light and dark, seductive and violent textures into a fluid and beguiling landscape of originality. As the Ocean Burns is a gem all should take time to search out and investigate, a triumph which should not be allowed to slip through the net.

As the Ocean Burns is available now @ http://store.dooweet.org/en/cd/151_nemost-as-the-ocean-burns.html

http://www.nemost.com

RingMaster 18/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Evenline – Dear Morpheus

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Hailing out of Paris, melodic metallers Evenline recently released their debut album and in the process made a rather potent impression. Richly enjoyable and impressively accomplished, Dear Morpheus is a sizeable persuasion of alternative rock and metal bound in the inspirations of bands such as Alter Bridge, Creed, Metallica, and Nickelback. It is a captivating proposition which lights a richly contented glow in ears and emotions whilst showing a potential of even greater things ahead as the band find their own distinctive sound and presence, which is not quite there on the album. It certainly makes for a pleasing companion, its familiarity to others a warm and easily accessible embrace to be fair, helping lead to a thoroughly satisfying engagement.

Formed in 2009, Evenline first made a mark in with their first release, The Coming Life EP the following year. The band continued to build an increasingly attentive support and attention with their shows, including supporting Alter Bridge in Luxembourg in 2011, before the quartet settled down to record their debut full-length with producer Jim Dewailly. Its arrival in the flavoursome shape of Dear Morpheus, suggests the band is on the brink of a much wider recognition, something the release which without setting new standards firmly deserves with its eleven melodically crafted and emotionally eventful songs.

The album makes a swift persuasion on ears and imagination, the evocative opening to Misunderstood, a melodic caress matched by the potent tones of vocalist Aarno Gueziec. There is an almost hazy glaze to his voice which adds to the expressive start of the first song, a coaxing which eventually roars with passion and intensity as riffs break out with raw energy. Imposing rhythms match this emerging sturdy incitement whilst vocally there is also a powerful evocative flame to the delivery which captivates ears. With a Seether meets Breaking Benjamin like feel to its creative potency and easily pleasing sound, the track makes a gripping beginning to the release, especially with the sonic flame of enterprise from guitarist Fabrice Tedaldi which erupts across the encounter.

Without You keeps the album flying high with its almost rabid gait and energy, choppy riffs and magnetic grooves winding masterfully around ears as the beats of Olivier Stefanelli provide an equally compelling frame. With a virulently Album Covercontagious chorus and similarly rampant urgency to its whole body, the song romps with a Sick Puppies bred swagger and suasion, one loaded with passion and occasional outpourings of caustic growls and sonic fury. It is an outstanding slice of melodic metal increasing the appetite ready for the following Letter to a Grave and Insomnia. The first of the pair is an emotionally charged stroll with an enjoyably enticing throaty call from the bass of Thomas Jaegle through a cascade of vocal harmonies and fiery riffs. Gueziec provides an emotive croon to the skilled web of invention in the song which from a slow start increasingly impresses. Its successor flexes its sinews for an agitated and tenacious exploit which like its predecessor does not quite match the opening two tracks but provides another satisfying turn to the album. It is hard to avoid comparisons to Alter Bridge, Three Days Grace and the like, but such the craft and prowess of songs and band from vocals to sound, it does not defuse the enjoyment offered by the different songs.

Both the resourcefully catchy Over & Over and the heavily emotive Already Gone leave ears and thoughts richly contented if not surprised before the excellent title track weaves its intriguing enterprise. From a haunting atmospheric opening, a sultry melody flirts with the imagination. It is aided by the equally suggestive mystique of the bass, both laying a warm canvas for the excellent vocal skill and strength of Gueziec to further colour. It is a transfixing offering, the most inventive and unpredictable song on the album with its inventive rhythms and sonic exploration, and the pinnacle of Dear Morpheus.

The aggressive Hard to Breathe ignites the senses next, pounding beats the forerunner to carnivorous riffs and cantankerous grooves which are tempered by infectious vocals and the anthemic ingenuity of the raucous exploit. It is a quick match to the heights of the previous song and those setting things off, but also another weighty twist in the character of the songwriting and presence of the release.

The next up Judgement Day is no slouch in inflaming ears and emotions either, though it lacks the spark and lingering potency of those before it, even with its imagination entwining grooves and suggestive melodies. The same applies to the enthralling power balladry of You Should Have Left Me, a perfectly crafted and melodically coloured proposition but one which despite all its impressive elements is an exciting proposal in its company but soon forgotten away from its charms. Nevertheless both only add to the potential of the band before the closing slow croon of Eternal Regrets provides a gentle and mesmeric conclusion to the album with its emotive strings and acoustic hues.

Dear Morpheus might not be ground-breaking in originality but with its inventively sculpted songs and the open skill and imagination of the band, it is a very enjoyable reason to check out Evenline and their journey to finding that distinctive presence.

Dear Morpheus is available now via Dooweet Records @ http://store.dooweet.org/en/home/133_evenline-dear-morpheus.html

http://www.evenline-music.com/

RingMaster 18/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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(Hed)p.e. – Evolution

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From the first striking and forceful raw incitements of tracks like Firsty, Tired of Sleep, and P.O.S., on their self-titled debut album, (Hed)p.e. has been a lustful follow for us at The RingMaster Review. Certainly their subsequent albums have ebbed and flowed in success but each hitting the personal sweet spot to some degree or other. So new release Evolution had a head start with thoughts but also faced a more demanding appetite after eight highly persuasive previous studio full-lengths. The questions and hopes placed before it were swiftly swept aside by a release which lives up to its title musically as well as in theme. It is a thrilling proposition which maybe does not show its new shift in ideation and sound as loudly in some tracks as in others but provides a tantalising brawl of intent and enterprise which should ignite even the emotions of those not quite as enamoured as ourselves.

Evolution is the quartet’s first release with Pavement Entertainment and sees the Huntington Beach hailing band grab inspiration from their heavier roots; sinews and heavyweight riffs challenging the senses as grippingly as the cast of flavours and imaginative ideation more expected from a (Hed)p.e. incitement. Just stepping into their third decade, the band has almost regrouped their ideas and thoughts with Evolution, starting a new chapter with the cream of the essences which took them to this point in time and entwining them with new adventures. As mentioned the album does not persistently roar with its new intent but there are equally times where new twists inspires the tingles first felt when discovering the eclectic enticement of the band way back in 1997 through their first album three years after founding.

The opening slap of tom toms announcing opener No Turning Back instantly grabs attention, their easy coaxing leading ears into a fiery wall of intensive riffs and forcibly crisp rhythms. It is a potent slap on the senses with the sonic HedPE_Evolution_Covergrowl expected of the band. Veins of melodic acidity add drama and intrigue to the proposal before the distinctive vocals of Jared Gomes surge into view with the lyrical confrontation and antagonism again firmly assumed of the band. With climactic shadows and imposing intensity, the track is a scintillating start, an infectious rage to set things off. The bass of Mark ‘Mawk’ Young is a throaty predator throughout whilst the melodic flames of guitarist Jackson ‘Jaxon’ Benge sparks the imagination to run with even more urgency into the accusations of Gomez.

The outstanding encounter is swiftly matched by Lost In Babylon, the track a blaze of metallic intent and hardcore passion. Again guitars craft a web of unpredictable and incendiary bait punctuated by the mighty rhythmic swings of drummer Jeremiah ‘Trauma’ Stratton whilst the bass stalks the senses with a belligerent yet addictive voice. Gomez flings notes and intent at thoughts with his accomplished and unique style whilst the chorus is pure (Hed)p.e. infectious persuasion, an anthemic bellow to ignite body and emotions.

A Rage Against The Machine like groove opens up Jump The Fence, its lure evolving into a progressive caress which in turn moves into scenery of jagged riffs and expressive grooves within a firm rhythmic caging. Stood over and incited by the great variation in the vocals of Gomez, the song strides with an agonistic swagger which again easily seduces for an inescapable anthem, a staple lure in a (Hed)p.e. provocation as shown by 2 Many Games in its slower flowing emotive expanse. Stirring imposing riffs strike through ears as a melodic weave of enterprise wraps the sturdy pace of the track, its emotive elegance and sonic narrative a colourful wash to the muscular core. It is not a rampaging offering but a thickly involved and imaginative suggestiveness with just as potent a temptation as the more rousing elements of other tracks.

The heavy rock canvas of No Tomorrow brings further diversity to the album, rigorously snarling vocals stalking predacious riffs and barbarous hooks for a tenaciously appetising provocation. Commandingly catchy with a vicious essence to its gripping breath, the track puts a militant spark into the passions before making way for the flavoursome venture of Let It Rain. From agitated and argumentative textures, the song seamlessly flows through immersive harmonies and scorching melodies, though everything is courted by a formidable intimidation and oppressive intensity. It is a riveting expanse of songwriting and evocative sound which is surpassed by the pugnacious One More Body, the band unleashing its most hostile weight and energy yet. It comes with another dose of infectious virulence too, another enslaving anthem for thoughts and emotions to get their teeth into.

From the more even tempered suasion of Never Alone, a strong and eventful song which just misses the spark of its predecessors yet enlists the full of the listener, the album moves through the unexpected meditative shadow of The Higher Crown to venture into its reggae seeded finale of tracks. The short ambience fuelled instrumental is an intro which sort of works though to be honest the haste to get to the excellent Nowhere To Go means it gets passed over more often than not. The next song is a delicious stroll of hazy melodies and mellow rhythms bound in a richer soaking of the reggae crafted charm the band has never been unafraid to explore. A tool for body and mind to work with, the song casts a spellbinding tempting which is emulated by the sultry tones and radiance of Let It Burn. Keys and guitars flirt with the senses whilst a dub spicery walks hand in hand with the vibrant vocal and staggered riffs, all combining for one of the most contagious and addictive songs likely to be heard this or any year.

The album closes with the smouldering presence of Hold On, the last of the reggae seeded encounters which is here courted by r&b soulfulness. Without lighting the fires of the previous two tracks it is still a fine end to a thrilling encounter, a triumph with only for personal tastes the fact that the closing trio of songs were seemingly segregated from the rest rather than scattered across the heart of the album slightly out of place . It is the only flimsy niggle to be found in Evolution though, a release which may or may not be the greatest (Hed)p.e. to date but is certainly the most eclectic and flavoursome proposition from the band yet.

Evolution is available now on Pavement Entertainment @ http://www.pavementmusic.com/product/hedp-e-evolution-cd/

http://www.hedperocks.com

Check out our interview with Hed)p.e. guitarist Jackson Benge @ http://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/09/18/shifting-fights-and-battle-cries-an-interview-with-jackson-benge-of-hedp-e/

RingMaster 18/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Cannibal Corpse – A Skeletal Domain

byAlexMorgan_01

Cannibal Corpse and their sound need no introduction to metal fans and in many ways nor does the band’s new slice of savagery, A Skeletal Domain. The thirteen studio album from the US death metallers feeds all the wants and expectations of the genre and fans yet also manages within its contagious surface turbulence, to explore new twists of endeavour and vehemence soaked adventure in the depths of songs. The distinctive fury is a fresh if not startling evolution in the onslaught we have all come to know and assume from the band; one providing the rich flavours the quintet is renowned for whilst providing a breath-taking rampage through the senses to again seriously ignite the passions.

A Skeletal Domain also sees the band move from the production of Erik Rutan who added certain richness to previous releases Kill, Evisceration Plague, and Torture. For the new album, Cannibal Corpse has recruited the talents of Mark Lewis at Audio Hammer Studios who has produced the recent albums of The Black Dahlia Murder and DevilDriver amongst many. His touch allows clarity to the emerging twists of ideation and sound within the violations posing as songs. The elements are arguably still not as vocal and instantly striking as maybe they could be but they are allowed a platform to increasingly tantalise from by a production which seems clearer and more conducive to the enterprise than on earlier encounters.

Lyrically there are no surprises; blood, gore, and violence providing aural ‘horror movies’ within the sonic and rhythmic severity as immediately shown by opener High Velocity Impact Spatter. From an intimidating waspish sonic mesh of sound, the track pounds ears with some of the heaviest swung beats heard this year, every swipe thunderous within the brewing assault of corrosive riffery and psychotic sonic endeavour. There is no escaping that recognisable Cannibal Corpse toxicity or the addictive web spun by the guitars of Rob Barrett and Pat O’Brien. It is an intensive and contagious furnace exploding within the ears, driven venomously by the thick caustic growls of George “Corpsegrinder” Fisher and the increasingly intrusive beats of Paul Mazurkiewicz. There is always a ready and waiting hunger for the band’s sound and its appetite is potently fed by the song with extra flavouring from the swirling invention cast by the guitarists.

Both Sadistic Embodiment and Kill or Become seduce and ravage the air as well as senses with skilled animosity, the first a barbarous torrent of rabid riffery and bone splintering rhythms bound in a merciless predation. The bass of A Skeletal DomainAlex Webster growls spitefully from within the severe enticement, another aspect of the band given closer attention on the album compared to some earlier incitements. Its successor finds an even more bestial air to its prowling heavyweight presence, its muscles flexed through every hellacious swing from Mazurkiewicz and the venom unleashed through a horde of rapacious riffs and the increasingly contagious vocal suasion of Fisher. The track is a maelstrom of malicious enterprise, one threatening to become unravelled at times, especially around a senses searing solo, but always checks itself to parade a pestilential and irresistible scourge.

The title track tears through ears and imagination next, its intensive stomp flaring with malice and rhythmic sadism whilst vocally it sprays inhospitable emotion like a sand storm. A welcome variation in gait and intensity offers an intriguing turn whilst another potent solo flames excitingly across the track adding to the weighty fascination of the proposition. At first glance the following Headlong into Carnage is a close relation to its predecessor but eventually emerges with a distinctive tone and ruinous attitude which is as compelling as it is enjoyably oppressive.

The deranged and blackened suasion of The Murderer’s Pact is next, guitars crafting an addictive and destructive sonic trap to which vocals and rhythms make available their rewarding yet ruinous hues. It is an absorbing challenge, the band delving into tortured shadows with open relish and magnetic invention. The sonic ingenuity of the solo within its haunted climate is exceptional, not outstaying its potency but adding enough colour and radiance to light the cavernous malevolence of the song. Its triumph is matched by the pernicious lumbering atmosphere of Funeral Cremation, its increasingly expanding and toxic voice breeding an uncomfortable and invigorating onslaught of coarse sonic rabidity and rhythmic voracity. It is the winding groove of the song though which lights the passions most of all, its crawling temptation irresistible within the tempestuous climate around it.

The viciously chilling and tenaciously compelling Icepick Lobotomy and the enthrallingly inventive Vector of Cruelty ensure senses and emotions are ablaze with pleasure and breath-less satisfaction but it is after their outstanding efforts that the album hits its pinnacle, the final trio of tracks leaving the strongest lingering impression. Bloodstained Cement steps forward first and from its drama fuelled start unleashes an insatiable rampage of hypnotic rhythmic turmoil and contagion drenched riffery. There is a flowing addictiveness to the track which soaks every aspect of its unrelenting swarm of sound and ideation. The track is an exhaustive treat but soon surpassed by the brilliant Asphyxiate to Resuscitate. As expected there is no peace from its poisonous intent and rabid jaws, guttural growls and drums a finely honed and barbaric blitz on ears whilst guitars and bass combine to sculpt an impossibly infectious malignant gale.

The album closes with the hellacious creative fury of Hollowed Bodies, a last explosion of bad blood and ear seducing grooves within a back breaking intensity. It is a scintillating end to a mouth-watering release, seeing Cannibal Corpse at their best with very loud whispers of new exploits to tantalise within a recognisable presence and sound which fans will willingly embrace. The band’s best album can and will be debated but one of their most pleasing and enjoyable A Skeletal Domain definitely is.

A Skeletal Domain is available now via Metal Blade Records @ http://www.indiemerch.com/metalbladerecords/item/27304

http://www.cannibalcorpse.net/

RingMaster 17/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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