Pink Tatami – Chapter and Verse

Pink Tatami

It is with great thanks to the vocalist of Pink Tatami, Mike Marques that we can bask in one of the most invigorating and downright thrilling releases of the year so far. The frontman of the French band introduced himself and colleagues with the hope that a review of their debut album Chapter & Verse might be possible. One blast of just its opening song and a review was not only possible but essential. Consisting of twelve exhaustingly imaginative fusions of alternative rock and metal, with plenty more besides lurking and seducing from within, the album is a breath-taking tantalisation. Bulging with virulent hooks, deceptive shadows, and an irresistible invention which hooks its claws in from the first second to the magnetic last, this is a debut of not only an outstanding band but of a potentially major force.

More than merely flirting with experimental tendencies, the sound of Pink Tatami feeds off the richest essences within metal and rock, every song a distinctive individual combining for an enthralling and mouthwatering proposition. Toying with and igniting the imagination and passions like a mix of Faith No More meets Kontrust with the devilry of Dog Fashion Disco and Destrage adding to the constantly evolving recipe with an extra spice of 6:33, sound and album roars and teases with all the charm of a bestial predator, the seduction of a sultry temptress, and the psychotic lures of a deranged puppeteer, though not always in that order or combination.

Recorded over a two year period, Chapter & Verse leap at ears and imagination right away, the Paris quartet simultaneously stroking coverand threatening the senses with dark riffs and rhythms with the entrance of opener Twisted Lip. The track soon settles into a feisty keen stride, the bass of Alex Ghilardi growling imposingly whilst the guitar of Florent Beaucousin coaxes and fires up thoughts in league with the richly impressive tones of Marques. It is an immediately flaming temptation which elevates its psyche metal seeded bait with the pop rock twist of the chorus. That Faith No More comparison is a swift suggestion though song and Pink Tatami only use it as flavouring to their ripe feast of sound. Across its saunter the song fuses in some funk twists with a Red Hot Chili Peppers lilt and a strong melodic rock grunge like enticement, an ingenuity which only adds to the potency.

The very strong start is soon shaded by the following Sinistra, which opens up its lure with an electro resonance, its stimulating wash surrounding the welcoming vocals and subsequent blaze of guitar steered by the punchy beats of drummer Bamby Alfonço. Again there is a definite Patton-esque flavour to the teasing which only accentuates the rich tones of the song. Flowing into slower romancing avenues and rapaciously toned energetic ventures, the track keeps thoughts and appetite on their toes and greedy for more which False Rebounds is more than happy to offer. Sinister whispers lurk as a singular guitar brings the song into view, the dark ambience standing over the emergence of the song until pushed aside by funky enterprise and bouncy vocals which step in to steal attention. It is a constant balance though, the shadows never far from making their narrative heard alongside evocative melodies and the livelier urgency of the track ever eager to have its say. It results in a riveting and thrilling proposition though in many ways just the appetiser to its quite magnificent successor.

The title track to the album is simply glorious, from its opening scrub of riffs and pulsating hypnotic beats a ridiculously virulent and anthemic suasion. The start has a Buzzcocks feel to its tempting and is soon courted by surf rock like croons and floating harmonies. Capture of heart and soul is done within those opening seconds, leaving the rest of the track to wrap tighter bonds around their submission. Into its stride the track enlists the contagion of rap metal with hip hop seeded vocals chopping across the ears whilst a sonic mystique dances provocatively in the background before erupting into a blazing sun of impressive vocal soars and searing melodies. It is easily the best song on the album, and the others are mighty, and one of the best to grace the year to date, much like the album.

Fears that there might be an anti-climax in store after such a triumph are soon chased off by both The Employee and “A” is for…, the first stalking ears at through dark vocals upon a stirring ridge of riffs before expanding into an intrigue noir kissed adventure with a sultry melodic breath. A track which manages to smooch with and haunt the senses at the same time it is another striking slice of invention; corrosive floods of aggression and predacious riffs having as much of a say in the painting of the song’s mysterious canvas as the mesmeric vocals and entrancing melodies, not forgetting the arcane tempting watching on. Its successor brings a ska toned walk to its delicious pop rock dance, crooning and embracing the listener in another RHCP spiced escapade which entrances and mischievously plays.

   The caustic touch of Dumas & Dos Santos brings another flood of ardour upon the album, the carnivorous bass tones and rapier like aggression of the guitars and rhythms irresistible as they thrust a violent furnace of intensity through the ears. It is tempered though by an infectious side to its provocation which increases the epidemic invasiveness of the explosive treat. It is a pleasure taken on further by the dark suggestiveness of We Can Help You, a track veined by exploratory sonic adventure and intrusively appealing twists, and the intensively shadowed Dorothea Tanning, its tale and invasive sounds an enveloping cloak of danger and creative spite. The song roars and thrashes about as its theme unveils every black twist and intimidating turn whilst merging passages of intimidating seduction into the turmoil.

Adhesive spits and romances with its diverse wares next, the song a gentle caress in certain moments and a voracious assault in others reminding of Russian punk rock band Biting Elbows at times. The song is surpassed by the following Evokes, a spiral of sonic addiction from its first seconds before careering into the passions on a torrent of punk/metal rabidity. Grooves and riffs squall irresistibly across the bow of the rhythmically challenging song, vocals adding irrepressibly to the raucous tempest. It is a stunning and quite brutal peak to the mountainous range of the album, a Breed 77 toxicity only adding to the inescapable trap.

Closing on the mild in comparison Eye Bank, a song where thoughts of Poets Of The Fall come to mind but just another tone in something unique to Pink Tatami, Chapter & Verse is one of those gifts you cannot turn away from without assistance, an enslaving incitement with far reaching snares. Though long in the making, the album is only the debut of Pink Tatami, a quite magnificent and accomplished one admittedly, but just the start of their journey. It is scary to think how good they have the potential to become and extremely exciting.

The self-released Chapter & Verse is available now!

https://www.facebook.com/pinktatami

http://pinktatamiband.bandcamp.com/album/chapter-verse

10/10

RingMaster 17/04/2014

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Holy Mountain – Ancient Astronauts

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Binding the senses in grooves which show no restrain or mercy in their insatiable temptation and plying that slavery with riffs which voraciously gnaw and smother all before them, Ancient Astronauts the new album from Scottish metallers Holy Mountain, is an unstoppable juggernaut of sound and intensity. It is a heavyweight antagonist merging stoner and doom metal into a suffocating tsunami of intense and exhaustive sounds, but one which veins and sears it all with at times corrosive but always incendiary magnetic grooves and melodic causticity. It is quite simply an encounter which lovers of the riff will devour with greed.

Holy Mountain, its name taken from the Alejandro Jodorowsky’s 1973 movie La Montana Sagrada, was formed in 2009 as an improvisational duo by guitarist/vocalist Andy McGlone and drummer Pete Flett. Two years after emerging, the Glasgow band enlisted bassist Allan Stewart and went almost straight into the creation of debut release Earth Measures. The mini album found its release in the May of 2012 welcomed by strong responses and acclaim, a reaction sure to be replicated and taken to greater levels by its impressive successor. Recorded with producer Paul Savage (Mogwai, Franz Ferdinand), Ancient Astronauts is a giant leap if not for mankind certainly for Holy Mountain as they explore all the qualities unveiled on their previous release far more intensively and inventively whilst casting new wild and expansive endeavours.

LV-42666 brings the journey into view, cruising in on a sonic breeze before stroking the imagination rigorously with thrashing rhythms, Holy-Mountain-Ancient-Astronauts-300x288rapacious riffs, and addictive grooves; rogue vocals adding to the celestial mystery and adventure. As urgent as it is heavy, the track strides boldly as sinews bare their muscular appetite and melodies seduce ears with the guile and irresistible lures of a wanton temptress. There is also an unmistakable psychedelic pop romp to the encounter which only accelerates its submission of the senses and passions.

The following Luftwizard instantly brings a darker and heavier suasion but again it is lit by scorching melodies and also this time vocal harmonies which flirt and tempt the imagination as potently as the sounds. The voice of McGlone is fed through a Roland Space Chorus across the album bringing a spatial quality to his tones and the general air of songs, something equally inspired by the majestic pungency of accompanying keys. The thick imposing riffs of the song provide a deep texture to the affair which almost groans in its intensity and rapacious wrapping of the sonic maelstrom within. It is a masterful adventure guiding the listener through a union of dark and light, a mutual rather than combative merger but one with plenty of imposing shadows to its exultant fire.

The title track comes up next exploring cavernous sceneries with doom bred prowling riffery and rhythmic provocation whilst short but virulent grooves lance the thick smothering air, their strikes beacons through the appealing murkiness as the song heads into an explosive contagion which bursts out with urgency and sonic radiance. The track touches the darkest depths and brightest highs in tone leaving the senses exhausted and rewarded by the riveting ascent, their recovery given no respite as Star Kings from a rhythmic draw swiftly courted by a highly tempting bass stroll, feeds another strenuous passage of ravenous riffs and fuzz surfaced enterprise. The vocals are a little further forward and carry stronger clarity within the tempest of sound, though they still feel pleasingly immersed in the overall flood of the experience rather than being an overlying presence riding the waves. It is an aspect which is as potent and important as the riffs and rhythms in making the album the immense proposition it is, they and the ridiculously contagious toxins which the band also casts into the creative rabidity.

Not necessarily the best track, so hard to choose one, but a definite favourite here is Tokyo which comes next. A bestial vicious voice and growl to the riffs drives the track initially whilst the bass with its throaty appeal makes the good guy in the confrontation, its smiling grooves the temper to the predacious guitar grizzle and the trigger to the flirtatious sonic temptation and boisterous vocals which revel in the overwhelming devilry of the track. It is a siren of a song which is matched by Gift Giver, the danger which usually accompanies such a tempting and arguably missing in its predecessor, an open stalking at the start of the song. Its slow pacing is soon ignited as riffs escape their shackles, a punkish urgency taking over whilst the drums hold a little restraint in attack if not power. It continues to switch between extremes bringing a scintillating and unpredictable soundscape to play with and explore, a post punk severity adding its taunts from time to time in the lulls between unbridled sonic blazes. The instrumental is riff heaven and groove manna thrown into an aural alchemy and corruption to bask in.

The album is completed by firstly the seventies seeded psychedelically enhanced 100 Years A Day and lastly the smouldering expanse of Hollow Hill which alone encapsulates all you need to know about Holy Mountain in sound, skill, and imagination, as well as influences with a range of twists and enterprise which pull up references to Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, and Electric Wizard, ones you can apply to the whole of the album even with its distinct presence. Ancient Astronauts is a magisterial slab of psychedelic rock/metal and Holy Mountain a band poised to stake their claim for a seat on the top table of the genre we suggest.

Ancient Astronauts is available now through Chemikal Underground digitally and on limited edition vinyl.

http://www.holymountainband.co.uk/

9/10

RingMaster 17/04/2014

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Reverted – Sputter the Worms

Reverted Hi-Res Pic

Though you come out of it feeling there is plenty left for its creators to discover and find to develop a wholly unique voice, it is hard not to be impressed and eagerly captivated by Sputter the Worms the debut album from UK band Reverted. With the release of the band’s new single Die My Saint, taken from the album, a look at the full-length seemed in order. Consisting of thirteen tracks which roar at ears with a ferocious multi-flavoured brew of sound and aggression, the release is a fiery brawl merging thrash, hard rock, and varied essences of metal. The album rampages with imagination and voracity, crawling rigorously over the senses and passions with raw adventure. There is much within it which is arguably familiar but plenty which is vigorously individual as the album riots with thrilling effect.

Reverted began in 2010 and it is fair to say they have made a more than attention grabbing impression. They have backed up the promise showed by live performances with Sputter the Worms, a release which pulls feet and emotions into active submission early on and refuses to let them relax until it has finished its creative charge. The title track thrusts its muscular weight and body through ears first, though its entrance is relatively reserved with thick riffs and pumped beats making a less than forceful coaxing. It is a magnetic start all the same which increases its bait with a great whining acidic flame of guitar which triggers a hungry rampancy in the gait of the track. The bass of Luis L Valle and guitar of Daniel Ruiz stomp with a prowling menace and rasping riffery respectively with the song in full stride whilst the drums of Ozzy Preciado thump with intimidating skill. It is a richly engaging proposition completed by the excellent vocal tones of Tony Vega, his gruff but clean tones ably backed by those of Preciado. Like a mix of Metallica and Fuckshovel, thrash and punk pleasing additives to the heavyweight rocking going on, the song is a masterful opening persuasion.

The potent start is soon backed up by the similarly impressive Magledonia (Harvest of Sin), another brew brought on a thrash bred Sputter The Worms Artworkappetite. The track swaggers and ripples with antagonistic confidence and sonic bait, guitars and drums enslaving attention so the bass can stalk the senses as vocals sprawl with their menacing narrative. With a vein of classic and hard rock virulence to its encounter, the song romps with a straightforward but appetite sparking success before making way for Don´t Try to Steal Me from the Inside. Valle instantly steals early control of thoughts and song with his throaty lines before the rhythms of Preciado explode in highly agitated invention and the track crowds the ears with a predatory intensity. Groove and thrash metal collide perfectly within the song but also scorching flames of melodic and alternative rock add their spice to the exciting mix, with the vocals as the sound unafraid to vary and play with their delivery.

Both the outstanding Dispose of Heartaches and the new single Die My Saint ignite imagination and pleasure further, the first bursting with a devilish intent forging punk and thrash into a psyche rock and nu-metal mesh. The track exhausts and exhilarates the passions, stealing early best song honours though it is soon rivalled by its successor, an urgent aggressor with absorbing twists of sonic endeavour amidst another richly packed flavoursome design. Psyche and nu-metal colours the sinew driven encounter whilst the rhythmic frame is an unrelenting insistence with anthemic persuasion. The pair provides the first major pinnacle of the album, probably the highest peak though plenty of tracks like the following Pulse stand tall alongside their might. A growl erupts in the vocals and sound of the song, intensity driving forward with bestial rabidity to match the barbarous rhythms and the ever predacious bass provocation. There is a grunge flame to the cleaner stretches of the song though proving again the diverse ground and textures the band explores across the album. Admittedly there are familiar sounds at work too, that Metallica feel never far away, but Reverted mix and come up with an overall sound which holds its own in freshness.

The acidic entrance of Tolerance makes a dramatic lure before a mix of progressive rock and groove metal merges to enthral thoughts, the track littering its pleasing bulk with punchy energy, rising crescendos, and abrasive expulsions. It is another potent enticement which as its predecessors welcomingly lingers. It also in many ways closes the most immediate part of the album with the following Stained Soul andonwards, the album places its most adventurous and involved songs though it certainly does not relinquish its grip on appetite and passions. Stained Soul holds a slower gait than previous tracks but with intensity still high fills the vacancy with a focused melodic rock craft, though that is still courted by the rapacious intent the band revels in which ensures the song is no less a threat and aggressor than others.

The gentle caress of Insanity takes longer to persuade than most but with its emotive strings, warm melodic rock centre, and passionate grumble the track easily secures a greedy appreciation whilst the more power ballad like Forsaken with a definite Hetfield and co feel pleases firmly without lighting fires, the same which can be said about Stairs of Guilt. Neither song grips as tightly as others but shows the expansive power of the band in sound and songwriting which certainly excites.

   Sputter the Worms closes with firstly Time, a track which glides through a weave of styles and. As the previous two it fails to spark a full ardour but furthers the impressive skills and imaginative adventure of the band which are to enthuse over and anticipate creating greater triumphs ahead. Final song Bummer is a muscle driven slab of heavy rock with metal roots, a very easy to devour and enjoy straightforward protagonist.

Reverted is a band on a sure and striking rise in presence and creativity, with the potential to be something very special. They have a drama to their songs and an invention which defuses the recognisable elements also carried; the result one thoroughly thrilling ride.

The self-released Sputter the Worms is available now!

http://www.reverted.co.uk

8/10

RingMaster 17/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Imbroglio – The Struggle in Pursuit

imbroglio band photo 14

There is an overpowering beauty in something which is intensively tormented and destructively passionate, equally a compelling attraction in the most vicious inner struggles of man and their corrosive shadows, and that beauteous temptation does not come any more irresistible than the new album from US metallers Imbroglio. Returning from an obviously potent hiatus, the band has unleashed the ravenous The Struggle in Pursuit, a breath-taking slab of creative savagery which will leave newcomers to the band reeling and bring existing fans their most richly absorbing and imaginatively consuming presence yet.

It was a surprise when the Ohio band announced it was going on a hiatus on the eve of the release of their previous acclaimed full-length Declared Self Hatred. It was something which was desperately needed as band founder and  guitarist /vocalist D.J. Gilbert revealed in an interview with Exclaim!, where he stated “I no longer felt a fire burning inside because with Declared Self Hatred I felt like I finally wrote my final piece, my suicide note. I knew I was on my way to the easy way out. I literally expelled every ounce of hate for myself on that record. So it was either put it on an indefinite hiatus for a while or just allows myself to self-destruct.

Initially with the intent of starting a new band when ready to return to creating music, Gilbert was persuaded by new band member Bret Newland (drums/vocals) that the project had to stay as Imbroglio; that whatever Gilbert wrote and performed it would sound like the band anyway. Original band member Josh Deeter (bass/vocals) returned to complete the line-up with the trio setting about making returning EP which they recorded with Bobby Leonard. Featuring the contribution of keys and synths on a couple of tracks by Devon Robillard, who had played bass in the band at the time of the Sleep Deprivation album, The Struggle in Pursuit takes little time in smothering the senses and imagination in aural causticity and lyrical ravages incited by the struggle in the pursuit of happiness in today’s social climate. The songs rage and stand defiant against the wrongs and obstacles in life but with a triumphant and provocative stance promoting a broad and personal freedom.

The inventive tempest of grind, sludge, and doom metal from the band is veined by their most exhilarating and rigorous experimental TSIP_Album_Coverexploration to date; exhaustive and captivating invention immediately paraded on opener Full Speed. As its title implies, the song races through ears from its first breath, rhythms thundering down upon the senses and riffs immediately abrasing and flailing everything before them. Vocals need little coaxing to sear the air with vitriolic suasion as the bass darkens the imposing and strenuous maelstrom further. It is a disorientating treat, sonic spirals of invention and searing toxicity enflaming the imagination and an already drooling appetite for song and release. The track continues to lurch over and rip through the senses with sabre flung sonic twists of sound and a rhythmic predation which intimidates and commands full submission to its inciting call simultaneously.

The outstanding start is matched by the thick intensity and equally rapacious antagonism of Approaching, the track soaked in a passionate rabidity and driven by an anthemic enticement within a maelstrom of noise and intrigue. The track roars and rages as it engages and recruits the passions, every second a ferocious protagonist and every twist a mouthwatering intrusion of cutting sonic endeavour and enterprise. There is little time to concentrate on a single moment, the voracious attack and invention of songs a turbulence which needs numerous exploits to  explore fully which this and the following Gravity are perfect thrilling examples of. The third song of the release barracks and engages thoughts and emotions from its first touch, riffs and rhythms tenderising the senses as the guitar spurts potent sonic toxicity throughout the provocative landscape. It is a riveting furnace of emotion and sound which reaches a new height when solemn darkly toned clean vocals duet with the coarse squalls of voice and sound beneath them.  It is a tremendous sprawling and suffocating embrace of harsh and invigorating endeavour leaving the body a broadly smiling wasted mess.

Day Break gives no time for a breather or respite as it leaps straight at the listener, drums puncturing every inch of the psyche into which the guitars and vocal lay their vicious irresistible bait whilst the bass looks on with a dark hearted yet seductive lure. There is a hardcore violence to the track also which only accentuates its almost visceral predation leaving emotions smouldering and senses bruised. Its primal insistence makes way for Desolation, another track where the title reveals all before any sniff of the suffocating ambience and emotional suffering can soak the ears. It is a glorious cloud of despair and intent; one speared and split apart by unpredictable sonic imagination and skilled melody inspired shafts of scorched light. A towering conclusion to a quite brilliant encounter, the return of Imbroglio has given metal a new proposition to wax lyrical over, The Struggle in Pursuit deserving all the acclaim destined to come its way.

The Struggle in Pursuit is out via The Path Less Traveled Records now!

10/10

RingMaster Review 16/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Stoneburner – Life Drawing

Stoneburner

A compelling destructive seduction, Life Drawing the new album from US metallers Stoneburner, casts no doubts on the suggestion that the Portland quartet is one of the most exciting prospects in aural consumption out there.  Creating a scintillating weave of doom and sludge metal with atmospheric ingenuity and melodically sculpted temptation, the band escorts and very often drags a willing imagination across intensive and fiercely enveloping landscapes under tempestuously climactic sonic skies. The album enthrals and intimidates, inciting heavily emotive reactions to its own intimately emotional yet broadly applicable investigations of the “struggle to be a decent person in a world that keeps doing its best to cause you not to be.”

Formed in 2008 by drummer Jesse McKinnon (ex-Buried Blood) and guitarist Jason Depew (Buried At Sea), who had played together in many incarnations previously, and guitarist Elijah Boland, Stoneburner unleashed their first forage of the senses with the demo V.​L.​A. the following year. The band was soon making an impacting presence and noise within the Oregon underground scene, a proposition taken to greater attention and strength by the release of debut album Sickness Will Pass in 2012 as well as over the years the band’s acclaimed live performances which have seen them play with the likes of Yob, Sleep, EYEHATEGOD, Neurosis, Buzzov-en, Weedeater, Saint Vitus, Watain, Tragedy, Noothgrush, Graves At Sea, Lord Dying, Drop Dead, Whitehorse, Wind Hand, Bastard Noise and many more. Completed by bassist Damon Kelly (also Heathen Shrine and the son of Scott Kelly of Neurosis/ Shrinebuilder fame), Stoneburner now uncages their latest infestation of the senses and psyche, an encounter which leaves the listener simultaneously suffocated and invigorated.

Opening track Some Can smothers ears and senses from its first breath, a sonic breeze pulling in a thick and thuggishly textured collapse of NR088_STONEBURNER_frontcover_hi-res (1)antagonistic rhythms and prowling lumbering riffery. The track continues to slowly ravage air and recipient until the entrance of the vocals sparks a spurt of adrenaline and urgency to the persistently uncomfortable and demanding intent of the song. A masterful groove swings its bait openly and irresistibly across the dark bulk of the track whilst McKinnon offers slaps which simply send the body reeling and the appetite into greedier hunger. It is a dramatic and absorbing start where everything from the rapacious rhythms and carnivorous bass tone to the flesh scorching sonic designs of the guitars and the exhaustive vocals of Kelly, or possibly McKinnon with both providing  raw delivery across the release, outstanding alone and viciously majestic united.

The noir cloaked almost sinister and wholly magnetic initial coaxing of the following Caged Bird instantly has thoughts and attention gripped tighter. It is an imposingly provocative lure with the darkest irresistible shades of temptation, its destination a broad hint which you cannot anticipate with the piece at times offering the garage punk realms of say The Cramps as a possibility or the ravenous scenery of a Mastodon as an option to give just two examples. Where it does lead is into a corrosive tempest of sonic abrasion and virulent hostility wrapped in a doom drenched maelstrom of spite and malevolence. As its predecessor, the track finds a spark which injects an eager rabidity and raucous energy into the heart of the pestilential stalking and further on a bewitching melodic elegance as the song evolves and twists within its tortured stance.

The beautiful Drift brings a mellow respite next, the short acoustic guitar sculpted instrumental a safe peace before the savage tsunami of An Apology To A Friend In Need falls upon the ears. The track merges a melodic acidity and venomous intensity into a thunderously eventful and unpredictable adventure, rhythms and bass courting the uncompromising vocals for a merciless predation whilst the guitars seduce and carve up senses and imagination with a skill and ingenious ideation that is impossible not to be fully consumed and submissive for. The song is a beauty and the beast endeavour which is already in control of the passions before its turbulent mid-point.

Both the atmospherically enthralling Pale New Eyes and the Giver Of Birth immerse the listener into soundscapes which leave no room for outside interference. The first exploring a progressive essence to its scenic exploration before walking into a mouthwatering storm of sonic violation and rhythmic punishment, an oppressive brutality which only serves to ignite the imagination and exploit further. It is a riveting canvas of guitar invention and vocal ravishment around a frame of barbarous rhythms which ensures the short instrumental beauty of its successor with a haunting ambience is a psyche soothing godsend.

The next up Done is quite mesmeric and sensational, taking best song honours with ease despite the triumphs around it. Opening on a cinematic and again sinister entanglement for the imagination, it develops an eager stroll which continues to invite dark visions of a more filmic nature before striding through an intensive sludge fuelled narrative and infectiously incendiary drama in sound before the abrasing vocals add their strangled syllables and malice coated words. It is a brilliant tease and masterful persuasion and the perfect way to enter the immensely dangerous sonic world of Stone burner for newcomers.

You Are The Worst provides a colossal towering adventure to lose yourself within, every soar and fall within its antagonistic passage voraciously damaging and unrelentingly absorbing to almost match the plateau of the previous track. It turns into the most savage and bruising incitement on the album and in many ways the most satisfying before the closing epic persuasion of The Phoenix unveils its hypnotic journey. As good as eighteen minutes in length, the song emerges from a tightly enveloping almost claustrophobic birth within deep atmospheric waters. The song floats towards a crystalline light, heading up to a beckoning surface of escape and hope, its warmth realised by sultry guitar craft and caressing melodies. Initially intangible, malevolent intensity is also worming its way into the hues of the adventure, niggling away until erupting and soaking every twist and turn to become an inescapable cloud. It is a glorious technically impressive and narratively thrilling journey which never relaxes as the battle between light and dark rages within its imposing confines until the very end.

Life Drawing is a must for all with a keen appetite for masterful sludge and doom premises and those with a hunger for aggressive progressive explorations. It is not an easy listen at times but one of the most rewarding likely to be heard this year.

Life Drawing is available through Neurot Recordings now!

https://www.facebook.com/Stoneburner.PDX

9/10

RingMaster 15/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The Idol Dead reveal their ‘Dark Little Hearts’, on 5th May‏

The Idol Dead Online Promo shot

 

UK ROCKERS THE IDOL DEAD RE-RELEASE STUNNING NEW ALBUM!

 

Leeds rock crew ‘The Idol Dead’ spit out a heady amalgamation of infectious Rock ‘n’ Roll and spiky punk which tips its hat to the likes of Guns ‘n’ Roses, Foo Fighters and The Wildhearts. Pinning sledge hammer riffs against gargantuan choruses backed by thunderous drumming, The Idol Dead are poised to bring their sound to the masses in the shape of their blistering new album ‘Dark Little Hearts’, which is rebooted on 5th May, through the band’s own RAAA! Records label.

Born out of a mutual love for blistering riffs, The Idol Dead sport a varied collection of influences stemming from Rachael Stamp, Foo Fighters and Sex Pistols, to David Bowie and Queen. It’s no wonder that, given their eclectic tastes, the 5 piece offer something different – their own brand of big booted rock n roll!

Formed in 2008 and consisting of Polly Phluid (Vocals), Nish Gonsalkorale (Drums,) KC Duggan (Guitar), Tim Jeffs (Guitar) and Dan Sugden (Bass), the five-some soon became the best of friends. After honing their live set, the quintet began to play throughout the UK and swiftly earned a hearty reputation for delivering explosive live performances. The band have gone on to share stages with the likes of Killing Joke, Sebastian Bach, Buckcherry, Evil Scarecrow, Blackfoot, Warrior Soul, Molly Hatchet, Hatebreed, Pitchshifter, Laika Dog and Spear of Destiny, to name just a few.

The Idol Dead also have a strong DIY ethos which led them to form their own label, Raaa! Records. The label spawned the release of their debut album ‘Die on my Feet or Live on my Knees’, which was totally self-funded. However, the band decided to utilise the pledge platform for their sophomore album ‘Dark Little Hearts’, and within six weeks, they had what they needed in order to complete the album. Needless to say, The Idol Dead were simply blown away by the dedication and support of their fans.

Now with ‘Dark Little Hearts’ recorded and prepped for a national release, the sky is the limit. The band’s album certainly delivers on all fronts. From the urgency and cut throat riffery of ‘Blue Skies’, to the buoyant vigour of ‘Hey Girl’ and the radio friendly melodic brilliance of ‘I’m Drowning’, the five piece have everything in line and are set to battle it out for their place as one of the new breed of Brit Rock bands set to break in the UK!

 

Check out The Idol Dead live: 21st March – Sitwell Tavern, Derby; 30th April – The Duchess, York; 3rd & 4th May – Noize Level Critical, The Maze, Nottingham; 9th May – 360 Club, The Library, Leeds; 24th & 25th May – TBFM 5th Birthday Bash, The Snooty Fox, Wakefield; 31st May – The Riverside, Selby.

The Idol Dead Cover Artwork

www.facebook.com/theidoldead

I Divide – Last One Standing

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Expect the healthy buzz around UK melodic rock band I Divide to take on a stronger accelerated urgency as the band unleash their debut album Last One Standing. Containing eleven impassioned anthems crafted upon poetic melodies and stirring emotionally driven energy, the album lights up ears and imagination with consummate and accomplished ease. Whether the band is providing anything new to digest can be debated, comparisons to the likes of You Me At Six, Mallory Knox, and Deaf Havana very apt, but they create a thoroughly compelling and imaginative persuasion which cannot be denied or for the most resisted. It is an album destined to thrust the band into an intensive spotlight and recruit a fervour soaked increase in fans.

Out of Exeter and formed in 2011, the band first drew attention with their nine track release What’s Worth More that same year before pushing it wider by winning of the Red Bull Bedroom Jam in 2012. This led to numerous festival appearances at the likes of Download, Slam Dunk, and Hevy soon followed by a second Download appearance and playing the Reading and Leeds Festivals. It has been an impressive emergence helped further by touring with Funeral for a Friend and their own successful headline run. The release of the single Follow Me last year helped raise a strong anticipation for the band’s album, hopes and expectations now rewarded with a masterful collection of songs and imaginative enterprise.

The aforementioned single opens up the album; the emotive vocal cries of Tom Kavanagh, ably backed by those of guitarist Josh Wreford, LOS Packshotmoving in from a distance whilst keys caress the ears around them. It is a tempered but potent coaxing which soon launches its full energy through broad rhythmic punches from Dave Mooney and the increasing tempting sonic suasion of Wreford and Henry Selley. There is little time taken by Follow Me in hooking its contagious bait into the imagination, the dark bass of tones from Kristen Hughes more reserved in their presence but an equally dramatic colour to the impressive track. As is proven by all the songs, you need to settle and really dive into the track to fully unveil all of its mature and skilful essences with the surface gloss and attractive craft only half the story.

The following Tell Me Something has a similar feel and initial premise to its predecessor and if there is any nagging thing about the album it is the closeness some tracks are to each other in sound and structure, though again a closer detailed look reveals much more. The song wraps the ears in a finely textured and smoothly flowing breeze but against that there is a great snarl to the riffs and rhythmic intent which pleasingly complements and challenges the clean blaze of vocals and sonic endeavour. Once more the infectiousness of the track commands whilst the emotive expression of the vocals and guitar designs fully engage before making way for the new single from the album, I’m Not Leaving. Opening with a ballad kissed vocal and classical like keys, the song slowly bewitches the senses until bursting with a great chorus. There is something very familiar to the virulently catchy moment, whether from having heard the song previously and not realising, its closeness to other songs, or just evidence that the band is yet to find a unique voice for itself, but it is a magnetically captivating tempting which makes the whole song.

The sturdier Monster in Me shows the variety to the band’s invention , its sinews and towering rhythmic confrontation a welcome twist in the album though with the smooth and impressive vocal delivery, the track was going nowhere else than into another thoroughly pleasing melodic rock enticement. Arguably the first really open song of inventive adventure in its songwriting it is a major highlight on the album instantly matched by the rampant Cold at the Bottom, the song another to slowly unwind its body from an emotional slow caress before charging with purpose and colourful enticement across the passions. Again there is a richer adventurous invention to the song, marked by the swift and scorching solo which only pushes the album deeper into appreciation and the rather keen appetite sparked by the album.

Living in a Hurricane keeps heat and attraction from the album high, even if it slips back into that very agreeable but more familiar stance of songs before 27 Down, featuring the excellent tones of Rebecca Need-Menear from Anavae, explores another distractive variation. In many ways it is the vocal union which seals the honours but the song is a superbly crafted and creatively presented tempting from start to finish egging a hungry licking of the lips before both  Run Away and Say It Isn’t So take over and provide a feisty emotive anthem and mellow croon respectively.

The album comes to a close with firstly the bouncy energy and eagerness of Let Go, a track which brings another virulent lure to seduce feet and passions with, and lastly the excellent Look at Me Now. The final track is thick in drama, bass and guitars uncaging shadows for the melancholic tones of Kavanagh to lay his potent narrative. Tension builds across the song, rhythms adding their haunted drive before the song rather than exploding as expected relaxes into a stable continuation of that initial portentous enveloping. The climax of the song does increase in intensity and dramatic atmospheres, its closing hand almost early Cure like. It is a tremendous end to the release which almost alone shows the depths the band can still explore and its rich potential.

Last One Standing is an album you feel you already know and have heard before but it cannot stop itself and the band being one highly enjoyable and impressive proposition… and something to firmly recommend.

Last One Standing is out now via Destroy Everything Records

http://www.idivideband.com

8.5/10

RingMaster 14/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Memories Of A Dead Man – Ashes Of Joy

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There is always something appetising about releases which make you work and really listen to their intensive offering before truly reaping the rewards their exploits offer. Ashes Of Joy the new album from French metallers Memories Of A Dead Man is one such impressive encounter. An exhausting venture into thick emotive climates and exhaustive imposing soundscapes, the twelve track journey challenges and intrudes upon senses and imagination respectively for a continually emerging and enriching experience. Certainly a release which needs extensive time to devour fully, though it makes a more than compelling first impression, Ashes Of Joy is a masterful confrontation which gets better and better across its length and to even greater effect over each traverse of its riveting body.

Formed in 2006, Memories Of A Dead Man has evolved their sound over time into a thoroughly absorbing and enveloping persuasion, their albums Beyond the Legend and V.I.T.R.I.O.L. drawing strong and acclaimed responses, but with Ashes of Joy the band has reached a new height in songwriting maturity, provocative presence, and intensive imagination. The melancholic breath which envelops from within the dark shadows and imposing structures of the songs borders on suffocation at times but only in their soaking of every twist and shift of the narratives, musically and lyrically, within the demanding and inciting provocation which in turn intensifies the oppressive intensity and emotive atmospheres brought to bear. Crafted by a new line-up which has been in place from 2012, Ashes Of Joy is an exacting and simultaneously compelling adventure, not one for the faint hearted but certainly one for all those who like to sink their teeth into an incendiary slab of extreme invention and passion.

The opening Prélude (Solemn Requiem) immediately encases ears in a fiery sonic embrace, the guitars of Ben Debrun and Tony Garcia memoriesofadeadman_covercasting a scorching initial smoulder of melodic enticement which calls on the imagination with its evocative lure straight away. Heavier stalking riffs follow thumping beats in joining the molten coaxing as the track increases its intensity and stature; all the time the irresistible grizzled tones of the bass and bear like vocals intimidating and taking thoughts into the  darkest menacing corners in preparation for the impending drama.

That dramatic experience is soon upon ears and emotions with the following Aurora, the track a tempestuous testing of the senses with rampaging rhythms from drummer Jef Ertle powerfully badgering the senses as the guitars squall imposingly around them as vocalist Pierre Duneau ravages syllables and air. With the bass of Herve Osmont similarly enslaving attention, the song evolves in gait and attack throughout, the demanding onslaught at the start drifting into an emotive and thickly atmospheric consumption driven by a more hardcore rapaciousness from Duneau. The twists never relent in their potent and aggressive immersion of the imagination, every second and note a new adventure to fear and equally devour. This variation and that of the vocals is a thrilling and increasingly addictive proposition in what is already a thoroughly intensive and demanding but excitingly rewarding entrance.

The following The Fall Of doG – Maelstrom Involution swoops in on a tide of voracious riffery and sonic enterprise around firm rhythms to instantly seduce the appetite. The again diverse and expressive vocals add to the already captivating and savage sounds throwing their creative and passionate weight against ears. It is a more immediate track than its predecessor but no less involving and steeled in startling textures, and with once more that hardcore causticity to the two toned vocal delivery, it simply ignites senses and passions. The turbulent antagonism and contagiously enterprising confrontation of the track makes way for the shadow grasping emotional beauty of Melancholia. The song floats in on a dark poetic breeze of melodies and a shimmering resonance which drifts from the classically structured and emotively sculpted canvas of the encounter. Two minutes in and the song erupts with a fire of passion and angst coated hunger which drives both music and vocals across the senses like a ferociously lapping tide. Not far short of ten minutes in length, the track is a tumultuous toxin raging and surging through the veins of itself and the thoughts of it’s intended.

The raw and assertively vociferous Touched With Pensiveness steps in next to inflame the passions, inventiveness and unpredictable rabidity to the evolving intent of the track exhilarating. The track did not impress as others first time around but as with the whole album given plenty of time and attention emerges as one intriguing and impossibly enthralling pleasure, the soaring sirenesque female vocal lures just some of the clawing rocks to get willingly snagged upon. Its rich glory though is small in comparison to the triumph of Wounded Knee, a blistering tsunami of crippling rhythms and bestial riffs led by the animalistic predation of the bass. If that was not enough to fire up the passions, a virulently seducing groove ensures the track catches every passing thought and emotion, taking them on a towering severe ride to which ardour is the willingly given price. It is hard to pick out any predominate specifics which make the songs so successful across the album, but certainly here the mix of vocals, the barbarous stride of the rhythms, and that ever belligerent bass sound stirs up a lustful attention.

The short evocative instrumental From Mud To Heaven leads into the acidically flavoured and sonically crusading La Nausée, its breathless emotional pressure and dramatically powered presence holding a strong essence of bands such as Tool and Porcupine Tree to its throbbing breast. The track is a transfixing furnace of emotion and oppressive strength which enthrals with its adventure and ideation, the same that can be said of the distinctly different yet similarly sculpted Draft Of The Second and Going Out With The Whore’s Saliva. Though the first never manages to reach the heights of those before, its grunge/Nirvana like impassioned fervour and coarse imaginative temptation still leaves a greedy appetite in place to be fed by its outstanding successor. Leaden stomping rhythms and scarring riffs steer the menacing intensity and vocal demands of the track whilst caustic flames of melodic abrasiveness and scathing vocals incite thoughts and emotions for another continually gripping peak within the album.

    Ashes Of Joy is concluded by stoner fleshed uncompromising intimidation of The Fall of doG – Erase My Eyes and the extensive explosive landscape of The Swan’s March, both tracks employing scything melodic swipes within primal turbulent atmospheres and permeating ambient causticity respectively. They are both immense provocations to match the exhausting and scintillating weighty persuasion of the album. Ashes Of Joy takes no prisoners but feeds them with the most scintillating and potently demanding emotional investigations. As said Memories Of A Dead Man make you work with their album but pays you back with one of the best encounters this year so far.

Ashes of Joy is out on April 14 via Send The Wood Music/Season Of Mist

http://www.facebook.com/memoriesofadeadman

9/10

RingMaster 13/04/2014

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Brewed and Canned – Execute The Innocent

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The press release accompanying Execute The Innocent, the debut album from Austrian death metallers Brewed and Canned, suggests band and release is for fans of Cannibal Corpse and that is in many ways is all you need to know in deciding whether to face the brutality of the album. Except there is plenty more to the thrilling violation to take on board too; certainly the quintet from Vienna which formed in 1998 has a recognisable sound firmly seeded and bred in the older schooled premise of the genre but it comes with a technical rapaciousness and vicious intent that separates Brewed and Canned from the crowd.

Formed by twins Maximilian (drums) and Michael Fingernagel (guitar), whilst aged 15, Brewed And Canned has taken its time to unleash its first toxic full-length upon the world though the time has seen a trio of self-released demos which more than hinted at the impressive senses tainting which marks their debut album. The line-up of vocalist Florian Greiter, bassist Will Wöber, and guitarist Philipp Oppenauer alongside the brothers, uncages a provocation which has no time for trivial persuasions and intensity lacking temptations, the ten tracked onslaught an exhaustive and compelling aggressor but one with the knowledge and skill to damage through precise sonic endeavour as well as primal hostility.

As soon as the barbaric rhythms of Max slam down on the senses to the venomous courting of the guitars and the deliciously demonically BC-ETI-Coverthroated bass, attention is gripped by Multiple Bone Injection soon followed by an eager appetite as the band surge forth with rhythms flailing and riffs tearing the ears. It is an intimidating ravishment completed by the guttural spewing of Greiter, his voice a heavy yet coaxing toxicity grounding the fiery rampage of the track. The opener stirs up the psyche just as thoroughly too, a guitar solo adding citric spice to the virulent poison swamping the air, and though arguably the tempest is not offering anything openly new there is a vein of invention which begs to differ.

The following Behind 8 Doors also takes no time to settle on its intent, riffs and rhythms scarring and beating the senses voraciously from the first second as the vitriolic fury of the song and its narrative builds venom to soak the twist into a slower predatory gait. Complete with a contagion built groove, the song seduces with violence in its mind before switching back and forth into a vindictive cyclone of energy and power. The track leaves a bruised recipient in its wake, one never going to find any respite as the savagery continues with the outstanding Harvest and similarly intensive Perverse Reflections. The first of the two lurches over the senses with a menacing swagger and another irresistible groove which is not too distant a cousin to that of Pantera’s walk. With incendiary guitar scorching and a rhythmic fisting equally stealing the passions, it passes over to its successor and another immediate triumph. A varied vocal delivery sets out the premise which the guitars colour with expressive hues and sonic enterprise whilst bass and drums provide a crippling voracity in yet another prowling encounter. As with all songs, every member impresses singularly and as a united vicious roar, the guitars especially immense and inventive as well as mouthwatering with their intensive designs here.

From the two pinnacles of the album, there is a small dip as Killfuckfeed ferociously tucks with an unrelenting predacious gnawing into the senses. It is a slight drop really and mainly because of the might of the song’s predecessors, but it is fair to say that the protagonist never allows the hunger for the album to drift as neither does the severe Into Slavery, a track which traps and grievously enslaves the ears before spearing them with unpredictable sonic temptation and an undulating but constantly imposing carriage. It is another highlight though the fading out of the song annoys, a short grievance soon forgotten as the brilliant title track instantly has body and imagination involved with its emerging exploratory coaxing. A slow canter accosts whilst a guitar soars with caustic melodic flames through its thick scenery, the almost progressively spawned enterprise bewitching from within the building tension and intensity. Providing a flowing harsh landscape to revel in, the instrumental removes its intrusive charms for the rampaging and equally inflammatory might of Breathing The End to unleash its fierce breath and muscular malevolence. Barely two minutes long, the hellacious maelstrom has passions surging, and though again maybe some will claim there is little that has not been unheard before, it is a captivation of incredible infectious passion and enterprise easily defusing any doubts.

The final pair of songs, Vomiting Liquified Innards and A Violent Malestorm, do not quite match what came before but certainly in the case of the first stretches the invention and boundaries of the album with a masterful sonic web of intrigue through the skill of the guitarists and a rhythmic insistence which is quite breath-taking. Its successor with also a colourful enticement of melodic patterns is a final inhospitable slab of addictive vehemence and uncompromising craft leaving ears ringing, senses hurting, and passions longing for more.

     Execute The Innocent may have been a long time in its gestation but has introduced Brewed And Canned to a wider audience and spotlight with impressive endeavour and merciless voracity. It feels safe to say that we and death metal are heading for massive exploits with the Austrians, though hopefully in more frequent assaults.

Execute The Innocent is available through Blacksmith Records now.

http://www.brewedandcanned.com

https://www.facebook.com/brewedandcanned

8.5/10

RingMaster 13/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Tim Paris – Dancers

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Dancers is the ideal title for the debut album from London based Parisian Tim Paris, each of its tracks whether an open flirtation or a more chilled proposition, a vibrant adventurous waltz. Better known as one half of It’s a Fine Line with Ivan Smagghe, Paris has sculpted songs which pull the imagination into unpredictable and vivacious soundscapes. Each one is distinct and stands alone in the tapestry of the release but have a symbiotic union which provides one refreshingly inventive landscape for senses and emotions to bask in. Dancers ebbs and flows in success across its body it is fair to say but only to waiver within a constant magnetic seduction which never relinquishes its strength.

As renowned for his remix invention which has seen him reinterpreting invention from the likes of The XX, Femi Kuti, Battant, Au Revoire Simone, Ewan Pearson, and Tiga, the DJ, producer, and musician now unleashes his own electronic alchemy through the album, merging the purest essences of synth pop, new wave, post punk, electronica, disco, house, and much more for transfixing and evocative aural climates. Dancers provides insights into richly flavoursome cinematic scenes but also ones which have an intimacy which goes beyond voyeurism to draw the listener emotionally into the imaginative investigations. Featuring a wealth of guests, the album is also a collaborative affair embraced by the creative ingenuity of Paris.

Opening track Golden Ratio strides boldly in on punchy beats and an electro tinkling which reminds instantly of Love Cats by The Cure Tim Paris - Dancersthough it takes little time to show its own distinct tease to the coaxing. The song then infuses intriguing melodic lures which do not nestle easily within the established pulse of the song but only accentuates the awakening potency. Featuring Georg Levin of Wahoo, the song opens up warm arms of melody bred enticement and smooth vocal expression which are themselves veined by intriguing twists of enterprise and electronic investigation. The post punk strict rhythmic heartbeat steers the journey allowing thoughts to take in the radiant sights and absorbing atmosphere. It is an adventure which midway takes a breath to return with an even more masterful hold on the appetite, a case of absence making the heart grow fonder.

The enticing start is matched by Rain which sees the guest appearance of Coco Solid of the Parallel Dance Ensemble. The song drips slightly chilled riffs down upon the ear whilst a rhythmic shuffle hurries across the senses. It is another alluring start given extra drama by the skirting dark throated bass, the combination building a striking premise which is enriched further by the cyber kissed vocal narrative. The repetitive spine of the track bewitches constantly; the stark core holding Joy Division/Bauhaus like predation around which the elegant and mesmeric call of the song spreads and croons.

The metallic breath of Outback, Stones & Vinyl soaks the ears next, the initial caress of the song courting a John Foxx essence which never leaves the infectious persuasion. As the track explores its seductive canvas, building and colouring the imagination with inspiring textures, the instrumental toys with the senses further, stretching its provocative enveloping with an additional Bill Nelson like invention. Like standing on a heaven lit cliff top whilst warm winds and sights wrap rivetingly around the senses, the song puts the listener in a hypnotic almost meditative emotional trance.

The following Minireich which features Sex Judas and Rupert Cross and Disco Ellipse both create a transfixing dancefloor bred temptation, though the pair tantalise and shimmer in their enticement rather than leap upon the eagerness of feet. The first has a definite Yello feel to its mischievous invention, vocally and in the devilish temptation offered whilst its successor is a cybernetic tango, flashing sonics and dazzling electronics spraying their bait around before the emotive weave of distressed melodies and restrained bedlam make their play successfully for the passions. Those nor the next up Unsung Deaf Hero fire up the same intensity of hunger and thrills as the opening songs but all captivate and refuse to release the album’s hold, the third of the trio a smothering wash of thick ambiences and funk spawned vocals casting a dark dance of inciting suggestiveness and mystery.

Dancers is back to dominating senses and mind with the outstanding drama of The Grip. With Ben Shemie, Paris lays a noir bred sinister atmosphere within which guitar and rhythms stalk the imagination, the encounter a soundtrack which could easily grace any caped crusader or futuristic darkly shadowed enigma. All the tracks allow the mind to run riot with their aural paint but this more than most conjures up stories and emotions to intoxicatingly bask in.

You’ll Never Know also creates a tenebrous encounter to immerse within, it’s again noir crafted riddle an imposing and incendiary fuse for an adventurous mind to run with whilst ears welcome the varied vocal hues and electronic weaves. It is a blend which is just as alluring in the slightly lighter Extreme Nails, its celestial stroll within a heavy but slow rhythmic frame a beacon for the listener to explore in their own design. Shadows as across most tracks are never far away with their tempering relish though they have to take more of a backseat within the fruity exploits of Heaven Parking which again sees Sex Judas involved. There is a subdued but visible lunacy to the song which brings thoughts of the eighties Martin Atkins band Brian Brain. It is a thrilling revelry which steps aside for the equally delicious Backseat Reflexion to close the album. The song sees Forrest joining Paris in a last irresistible seduction, electronics and melodies aligning within a shadow built emotional seduction.

It is a masterful end to a similarly consummate release, Dancers offering a collection of emotive and provocative vignettes which absorb thoughts and passions like a sponge for exhilarating experiences and adventures. Apart from the length of a few tracks stretching their staying power to clutch at straws in an attempt to temper the enthusiasm, Tim Paris has provided his finest hour with his own solo release, the first of many we hope and suspect.

Dancers is available on 2 x 12″ vinyl, CD, and download right now via My Favorite Robot Records.

http://www.facebook.com/djtimparis

9/10

RingMaster 12/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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